19 Nisan 1890 Tarihli The Morning Call (San Francisco) Dergisi Sayfa 1

19 Nisan 1890 Tarihli The Morning Call (San Francisco) Dergisi Sayfa 1
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_F__=-» ■■•&<^^{s(\C^i^^4g^-:yl? 'A THE ACE OF CLUBS !§ A Great Russian Novel ! A jr __. the y IS U N DA V CALL.'I .^.ra^.__r-^-^.j^t^^ VOLUME LXVII-NO. 150. CUBAN BANDITS. A Reign of Terror in the Vicinity of Santiago. Three Soldiers Killed in a Conflict ISitli the Desperadoes. In Expert's Opinion of the Cause of the City of Paris Disaster— Scandal tn the French Metropolis. Special by the California Associated Press. Havana. April 18.— A reign of terror prevails near Santiago, Cuba, owing to the daring raids of two bodies of bandits, who bare been ravaging the country. The ban dits recently engaged in a conflict with the guards, in which three of the latter were killed. Troops are now pursuing the ban dits. It is stated that fear of the bandits is so great that 300 persons have fled from their estates and gone to the city for safety. AN EXPERT'S OPINION. A Sequence of Accidents That Caused the City cf Faris Disaster. London, April 18.— An engineering ex pert who inspected the steamer City of Paris after the accident, says the explosion of a dynamite bomb would not have caused more complete havoc. So thorough a break down was never before recorded. As to the cause of the accident the expert is satisfied that something in the engine did not give way first, bat a sequence of events was as follows: The brass liner on the tail of the shaft burst; then the lignum vitse strips were torn out, bringing metal to metal; the tail of the shaft ground away the liner in the stern bracket; then the steel shaft ground away itself, and bracket and shaft dropped; then the continual bending action which took place resulted in the shaft breaking just where lt came out of tne steam tube. BLAINE'S AGREEMENT. Eeport That the Behritg Sea Trouble Is About Ended. Ottawa, April 18.— Official advices have been received from Washington to the effect that Blame has practically agreed to the settlement of the Behring Sea dispute, and the rights of Canadian vessel-owners for compensation for tlie loss of their vessel: seized by United States revenue cutters will . be admitted. Sir Charles Tapper will ask for {.__., (X:O damages. This amount it is be lieved he will get, as all the evidence shows the seizures were not justified by inter national law, and money compensation by the United States Government is the easiest way out of the difficulty lor it. A l*.\lllb SC.-NDAIi. Gross Extravagance in the Administration of the Municipality. Pabis, April I-;.— There is a scandal concerning the municipal government of this city. The expenditures are simply, reckless. The cost of fetes, carriage hire, etc., is fully five times what it was under tbe empire. The sinecures in the gift of the municipality have been trebled and utilized entirely for the benefit of relatives of the Municipal Councilors. So far has the matter gone that it is impossible to hush the scandal or avoid Government in quiry. _ STANLEY'S MOVEMENTS. The Great African Explorer Arrives at Paris. A Royal Invitation. Brussels, April 18.— During his stay in this city Stanley will occupy apartments in the Royal Palace on the invitation of King .Leopold. Paris, April 18.— Stanley and McKinnon have arrived from Cannes. A Gsrman Spy. St. Petersburg, April 18.— sinsation has been caused by the announcement that the person who attempted to obtain plans of the Russian fortress acted under orders from Baron Plesseu, an attache of the Ger man Embassy. The latter suddenly de camped. The Dahomey Army. Paris, April Advices from Lagos state that the King of Dahomey, with an army, is encamped near Porto Novo. The Lilians have burned eight villages and caused a panic in the district Argentine Republic. Buenos Ayres, April 18.— A new Cabi net has been appointed, with Rodriguez Lena, a delegate to the International Con ference, as Minister.of Foreign Relations. The Commons. London, April 18.— In the House of Commons this evening Samuel Smith's mo tion in favor of a conference on bimetallism was rejected by a vote of 183 to 87. NEARING A CRISIS. ~*^-*******_*""*. -sia|_*******_______i***--_-*-__-*i ■*^T*y*i*Hß!*******_***l The Striking Carpenters Will Resort to Aggressive Measures. Chicago, April 18.— More and more of the kindred tradesmen of the carpenters are idle to-day. The industrial palsy Is spreading. To-day has been the most in active of all since the strike commenced. Not one man has reported for work. Should the strike continue into next week a complete paralysis of all business will re sult. Should the bosses continue not to ar bitrate soon, the strikers have agreed to re sort to aggressive measures. A new Master Carpenters' Association is to be or ganized in opposition to the old Builders' Exchange Association with that end in view, aud to settle the present strike. A conference was held to-day between the new bosses and the strikers which was con tinued till to-morrow night to give the strik ers an opportunity to learn the employing capacity of the association. _-_____.____>___, April 18.— The District Committee of the striking carpenters to day warned the contractors that unless their terms were acceded to within twenty lour hours the steps taken for arbitration would be abandoned, and on Monday every building trade in the city would be out, the came including plasterers, brick-layers.hod carriers, plauiiig-mill employes, etc., involv ing over three thousand workmen. Or ganized laber outside the building trades are pledging co-operation, and there is danger of a general tie-up. To-day notice was received from the Sec retary of the National Organization of Car penters that £5 weekly would be giver, single men. with a larger allowance for men with families so long as the strike lasted. The contractors offer twenty-seven cents as the minimum, with eight hours as a day's labor, but the strikers are holding out for thirty-five cents an hour. The Ansel Island Site. Senator Hearst has written to the Super visors, aikuuwledgiug the receipt of the order passed ou March 31st relative to se curing a sit* on An_el Island for a small pox hospital, and promising to use his ut most endeavors to secure a grant thereof U_y Excursion*. Commencing to-morrow the California Navigation Company's steamer T. C. Wal ker will make regular excursions round the bay, to Vallejo, Martinez and Crockett every Sunday, uuder P. U. Dink's manage ment. These trips in previous years have been pleasant affairs. _ -"r.acoine Turkeys.. The sophistication of food products takes curious phases sometimes, but we fear I the home talent In this line is in danger of be ing excelled by foreign competition. The artistic embellishment of circus horses is well known, but frescoing turkeys is a de cided novelty. It is said that the systeni The Morning Call. atlc decoration of these useful fowls is a vocation of a Parisian artist who, armed with a paint-pot,' scissors and a knife, im parts to well-advanced live turkeys of a flock a fresh tinting of the legs, trims their claws and beaks and accomplishes a gen eral rejuvenation with his subjects. It is unnecessary to add that the deception is discovered when tho bird is ready for the table. Some of the commission-houses which yearly import large quantities of Missouri and Nebraska fowl might find the services of such an adept of value. INJUNCTION DISMISSED. The Houston and Texas Central Railroad Salt Decided. New York, April 18.— decision has been rendered by the Supreme Court at the general term by Justices Barrett and Whit ing on an appeal from the order made at the special term limiting the injunction and continuing it as limited, in the suit of Michael Gerasheim and others against Frederick P. Olcott, Collis P. Huntington and others. This suit was begun for the purpose of obtaining a judgment, adjudging that the decree of the United States Circuit Court in Texas was " fraudulent, collusive, illegal and void." The prayer for relief asks that in the event of the court refusing a decree of invalidity tlie plaintiffs have a reasonable time to intervene in the Texas suit or apply thereby the original bill to set aside the de cree of foreclosure and sale of the Houston and Texas Central Railway Company under the company and all subsequent proceed ings. The plaintiffs ask for an Injunction re straining the defendants from issuing shares of stock or bonds under the scheme for the reorganization of the Houston and Texas Central Railway Company.the details of which have already been published ; as to the averment in the complaint that "the assessment was made unnecessarily high and in bail faith by Huntington and his associates" upon the stockholders of the Houston and Texas Central Railway Com pany to bar out the present stockholders ami to enable, under the said plan of reor ganization, the Southern Pacific Com pany to acquire the entire stock on the payment simply of the amount required to be paid to the first mortgage bond holders lor the interrst and expenses of the reorganization. Justice Barrett holds that such an allegation will not answer.. In his opinion, he says, there is no evi dence showing that the trust company acted arbitrarily. He decides that before the court can interfere, it must be made to appear that the claim* were unjust or excessive, and should have been included ln its estimate. As the case stands the complaint would have to be dis missed unless the court should proceed with a general inquiry into the nature ami justice of the floating debt. This func tion be thinks is more analagous to an in vestigating committee than a court. He therefore reverses the order appealed from assd dissolves the injunction without preju dice. New Tokk, April 18.— The Commercial Advertiser says: No action yet of the Pa cific Mail has been taken regarding the change of the terminus to Tacoma, as both Gould and Huntington are absent. It is possible that such a change is being held as a club over the head of the Union Pacific by Gould. A dickering is believed to be going on. Tlie loss of the Pacific Mail's San Francisco custom would undoubtedly be serious to the Union Pacific. Omaha, April 18.— Negotiations were concluded last night by which the Chicago, Kock Island and Pacific and Chicago, Mil waukee and St. Paul roads will within the next thirty days run trains solid into Omaha over the Union Pacific bridge. The contract was signed by General Manager Holcomb of the Union Pacific, President Cable of the Kock Island and President Miller of the Milwaukee. The contract also provides that the Union Pacific and Kock Island shall use the track jointly to Beatrice by way of Lincoln, by which the Kock Island proposes to extend its lines. FORTIFIED OUTLAWS. Kentucky Troops Fired Upon From Am- bush and Four Men Wounded. Louisville, April 18.— A deadly fight occurred this morning at 1:20 o'clock, sev enteen miles east of Harlan Court-house, up in the Black Mountains, between a de tail of State troops consisting of sixteen privates. Lieutenant Milton and Sergeant I'ullian, and about thirty outlaws who were fortified in an old barn. Five of the soldiers •were wounded. It is not known bow many of the outlaws were killed, as they still have possession of the barn. Corporal RUntin was sent in after re-inforcoments ansi knows but little, as he left immediately after the firing began. Troops have the barn surrounded, and it will be impossible for those on the inside to make their ess- cape. Yesterday afternoon Captain Gaither, who is commanding officer, was informed that there was a body of lawless meu, some of whom had been indicted for various offenses, at the above-mentioned locality, and that they refused to surrender to the authorities. He was asked for a detail of men for the purpose of arresting them. His men left camp yesterday afternoon, expecting to find the men they were pur suing in a private bouse about GOO yards beyond the barn from which they were bred upon. The attack was 'not looked .for at that point, and it came so unexpectedly that it demoralized the soldiers for a moment or two, but they soon rallied, surrounded the barn, and began firing into it from every direction, when it was thought best to cease action and hold the fort until re-inforce ments arrived with more ammunition. It is believed that a severe tight will take place as soon as the additional troops reach the place, for the outlaws are fortified aucl well armed with Winchester rifles, and swear that they will not surrender. The soldiers are determined and waul revenge for those who have been shot down. CONDENSED TELEGRAMS. Cnic.vco, April 18.— The highest temp erature to-day was 41°, tlie lowest 39°. It ls cloudless. Berlin, April Socialist Fritz Kreu gei has been indicted for libeling the Em peror and religion. Rochester, April 18.— Abraham Bogoati dus. Superintendent of Mails here, was ar rested to-day and charged with robbing the mails. Boston. April 18.— The Scotch cutter Mi nerva, champion of the forty-foot class, has been sold to Carroll of New York, brother of Royal Pbelps Carroll, owner of the Gorilla. London, April 18.— The jury in the case of .Sir George Elliott, who was sued by Mrs. Alice Hairs, a widow, for breach of promise, was unable to agree and was dis charged. St. Louis, April 18.— The Executive Com mittee of the Irish Land League, not hav ing heard from i'arnell in regard to the ad visability of holding a national convention, adjourned at noon. Chicago, April 18.— The bndv of Mattie Bacon, the young Conservatory of Music girl who disappeared from a boarding-house twenty days ago, has been found near Clarks Station, having been carried away by the swift undertow. Washington. April 18.-The Port Town send National Bank at Port T..wnseud, ash., has been authorized to commence business with a capital of $100,000. The oilicers are : President, Florence M. Wade; cashier. Wiles A. Wilcox. New York, April 18.-The appeal of Dil worth Choate, a reporter, now in Ludlow street Jail forcuutempt of court iv conceal ing himself in the jury-room where the Flack jurors were deliberating, was dis missed. He will have to complete bis sen tence. ___________.*-. • _■ . California Pensions. Washing--*.,' April 18.— California pen sions: Original invalid— Warren 11. Sals burg, Michael Walsh and William Quinli vnii, San Francisco; increase— Richard B. Clark, Kingsbury; original widows, etc.— Esther, mother of Traverse T. Doty, San Jose. _""*■""""""""""""__________"!""__ Poker -tec- ft_nry for Profits. The administrator of the estate of Joseph Spanler was ordered by Judge Coffey yes terday to receive bids for the purchase of the cigar-store belonging to the estate. The administrator stated . that the business could not be profitably continued uuless it had a poker-room In the back. The total exports from San Pedro for the first quarter of 1800 amounted to 13,215,057 pounds. For the corresponding period in 1889 they were ouly 2,008,000 pounds. SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY MORNING; APRIL 19, 1690-EIGHT PAGES. WILL REORGANIZE. I*. ■ i __ _ IT IT 1 Surprising Move tf a New York House. The Firm ol H. B. Claflin & Co. to Be Changed to a Stock Company. A Number of Indiana Officials Indicted on Charges by the Government of Com plicity in Pension Frauds. Special by tbe California Associated Press. New York, April 18. — Merchants throughout the country will be surprised to learn that the great dry-goods jobbing bouse of 11. B. Claflin & Co. is about to dissolve and reorganize again as a great stock company. According to the second clause of the will of H. B. Claflin, who died in 1885, the bulk of the estate was to remain in the business only during the Jllfe of his son John, or for a period of five years if John survived, in which case the business would be wound up and the capital with drawn and divided among the residuary legatees. The end of the five years Is rapidly approaching; John Claflin survives, and the firm is to become a stock company under the name of the 11. B. Claflin Company, with a capitalization of $10,000,000. Of this a large controlling In terest will be taken by the partners, John Claflin, Edward E. Eames and Daniel Robinson. A large portion of the balance will be opened for subscription to the employes of the house. The annual busi ness done by the firm has always been a matter of surmise. It is claimed that it once ran as high as $00,000,000, and it is stated that $38,000,000 was the figure for 188* TAXING FOREIGN STOCK. An Akron Merchant Who Will Resist One of Ohio's L.ws. Akron*, April 18.— 0. C. Barber, Presi dent of the American Strawboard Com pany, the Diamond Match Company, and one of Akron's most prominent citizens, has recently taken a legal residence in Chicago on account of the action of local authorities in attempting to enforce the laws relative to the taxation of stocks of so-called foreign corporations. Mr. Barber returnesl to the city and was presented by County Treasurer J. H. Seymour with a bill amounting to $113,219 for bask taxes on stocks certified to by Auditor Deck. Barber declares that Ohio's tax laws are unjust, unconstitutional and are ruining the business interests of the State. lit- will carry the case to the United States Supreme Court and employ the ablest lawyers iv the country. THE BIIIDGE PRISONER Action Taken in the Case of the Chinaman on the Niagara Bridge. Niagara Falls, April 18.— The China man, Lent Sing, from the American side, who had but Sl- with which to buy his way into Canada, the admission price being .so, and who was refused re-entrance Into the United States and was kept ou the bridge all day yesterday, was allowed to cross to this side at a late hour. He was put back on the bridge to-day. Washington, April 18.— Secretary Win dom has directed that the case of the China man who Is on the bridge at Niagara Palls, N. V., and who was not allowed to return to this country, and not to enter Canada, be called to the attention of the United States District Attorney for such action as he may think proper. OTTAWA, April 18.— In the House of Com mons to-night a member drew attention to tlie reported detention of the Chinaman at the suspension bridge. The Minister of Justice said he bad not beard of the case, and added that there was no law keeping out Chinamen, but jf a Chinaman failed to pay the duty he would be liable to a pen alty. _ HE LIVED HIGH. Making a Splurge on $70 Per Month Brings a Bptrt to Grief. New York, April 18.— George W. Fargo, nephew of James C. Fatso, is the defend ant in a suit brought by Adele Riccadona, and a judgment lor $286 75 has already been entered against him in the Supreme Court. This is the amount of a bill Fargo incurred in the plaintiff's cafe, where he was a nightly visitor. He smoked the linest cigars and drank the most ex pensive wines until the plaintiff discovered lie worked for a salary of $70 per month. Yesterday Judge B.srrett was asked to va cate the body execution which be had granted on the judgment, but counsel for the plaintiff argued that if it were vacated lie feared that the judgment would not be paid. Decision was reserved. LEFT BEHIND. A San Franciscan Fails to Accompany His Fami y to Europe. New York, April When the Ma jestic sailed Wednesday she had one steer age passenger less than was booked to sail. The missing man is W. H. Messenger, who arrived from San Francisco with bis wife and son, Tuesday. That night the family went on board the ship. . Messenger went ashore Wednesday to get some linen, and when he returned to the dock he found the Majestic out in the river. His wife and son were on deck waving their bauds frantically for him to come, and when the agents of the boat heard Messenger's story they ar ranged to send him on the Servia, which sails to-morrow. BOOJIEItS CELEBRATING. Festivities in Commemoration of the Opening of Oklahoma. Guthrie (Ind. T.), April 18.— Extensive preparations are being made to celebrate the first anniversary of tho opening of the Territory on the 22d Inst. Two tribes of Indians will participate, and citizens in general will assume once more their old characters as boomers. News of an agreement by the Conference Committee on the Territorial bill, making Guthrie the capital, was received with man ifestations of great joy to-night. PENSION FRAUDS. Several Indiana Officials Indicted on Govern- meet Charees. Indianapolis, April 18.— Lee F. Wilson, ex- Representative of Shelby County, was rearrested to-day and charged with pension frauds. William T. Wilson, bis father, is similarly indicted. Edward Majors, Wil son's successor in the Pension Bureau, has been arrested for perjury, and Cbarles J. Fastlabon, Deputy Clerk of Shelby County, has been capiased for conspiracy, all by the Government. Bonds were given. HANGED FOR MURDER. Confession of an Outlaw Who Led a Band of . Cutthroats. . Birmingham (Ala), April 18.— Ben Elzy was hanged to-day for the murder of J. W. Meadows. He confessed that be led an or ganized gang of murderers and despera does who committed three murders, one of the murdered persons being a woman. Gil bert Lowe, another member of the gang, was hanged here last February. Others have been convicted. WORKING -GIRLS' CONVENTION Country Clubs Maintain Their Independence end Exist Without Outside Help. New Yobk," April 18.— In the Working girls' Convention, the delegates debated yesterday the question whether the clubs should : aim to be self-supporting. There was considerable discussion ou the question of .how the country -dubs could maintain their independence and exist without out side help. Miss Sheffield of Utica answered by explaining how the Utica Club suc ceeded through the assistance of the towns men, who gloried in the pluck of the girls and gave them support.. A vote of thanks was passed to the press for favors ex tended. THERE WAS NO GOVERNOR. The President of the New Hampshire Senate Temporarily Promoted. Manchester (N. H.), April 18.— Su preme Court has decided that a vacancy ex ists in the office of Governor owing to the illness of Goodell, aud Arthur Taggart, President of the Senate, must assume the duties of the office until the Governor re covers. STRUCK ON A REEF. The Steamship Italia Wrecked Off One of the Barbadoei. New York, April 18. — The British steamer Falcon arrived to-day from the Barbadoes, with twelve of the crew of the Italia, which struck a reef off Watlings Is land. The ltali _ will probably be a total loss. Prire-Fight Arranged. Boston*, April 18.-o'Rourke, Dixon's manager, received the following cablecram, dated London, this afternoon: The light will come oil in Ihe middle of June; weight. 114 pounds,; £400 to Ihe winner, £100 to the loser and £100 lo Dixon lor expenses. Re ply. PELICAN CLUB. This refers to the proposed match be tween George Dixon and Nunc Wallace. O'Rourke will accept and start about the Ist of May. Grand Army £ ection. Denver. April 18.— The annual encamp ment of the Colorado and Wyoming De partment of the G. A. R. to-day elected the following officers: D. L. Holden of Colo rado, Department Commander; N. J. Ryan of Wyoming, Senior Vice-Commander; Au gust Rische of Colorado, Junior Vice-Comm ander. The encampment adjourned to night after a parade and camp-fire. General Alger leaves in the morning for Cheyenne. Two Icdietm-nts New York, April 18.— Grand Jury to-day presented two indictments against Conductor John Houghtaling, who ran the Lake Shore train which was recently wrecked at East Hamburg, one of man slaughter in the second decree, the other of willful violation and omission of duty as a railroad conductor, by which human life was endangered. Long Contest Among* Democrats. Indianapolis, April 18.— The Democrats of the Second Congressional District to-day nominated John L. Brity of Dubois County for Congress on the three hundred and seventy-eighth ballot, remaining in session all night. They met at Shoals, Martin County. Ex-Congressman Cobb anil ex- Speaker Niblack were among the defeated candidates. Corbett Loses an Umbrella. New York, April 18.— The "Five A's," a well-known dramatic, athletic and base ball club, had six umbrellas manufactured, valued at 835 each, to present to prominent persons. before they bad a chance to give them away somebody stole the entire lot. One was intended for Jim Corbett, tbe pugilist. Denver Defeats Omaha. Denver, April 18.— The second game of the Western League series, between Omaha and Denver, resulted in a victory for the home nine to-day. The score was: Denver 10, Omaha 8. The weather was fine and 2000 people witnessed the game. ON EASTERN TRACKS. Results of Yesterday's Races at Elizabeth and Memphis. ELIZABETH, April 18.— weather to day was pleasant and the track fine. The races resulted as follows: First race, three-quarters of a mile. Ford ham (Hamilton) won, St. John (Garrison) second, Lisimony (Warwick) third. Time, 1:18'/,. Second race (handicap), one and an eighth miles, Eric (Warwick) won, Hamlet (Penny) second, Jim McCormlck (French) third. Time. l:58 Third race, one and a sixteenth miles (selling). Golden Ruin (Thompson) won. Lotion (Bergen) secoud, Vandergrift (Slack) third. Time, 1:52. Fourth race (Meadow stakes), three-quar ters of a mile, lima B (Bergen) won, Sama ria (Taylor) second, Belinda (Flynn) third. Time, 1:10. Fifth race, three-quarters of a mile (sell ing). Golden Rod (J. Trilee) won. Can't Tell (Flynn) secoud. Theora (Church) third. Time. 1:18%. Sixth race (maidens), one mile. Kings bridge (French) won. Minuet (Kiley) second, Lee Christy (Bergen) third. Time, 1:41554. M-mphis Results. Memi-his, April 18.— The track to-day was slow. Tne weather was mild and cloudy. First race, three-quarters of a mile, for all ages, John Sherman won, Julia Magee secoud, Virgie dOr thud. Time, 1:20%. Second race, seven furlongs, Tom Stevens won, Koxbury second, Kenllworth third. Time, 1:38. Third race (Turf Exchange stakes), half mile, Dundee won, Chimes second, Buwen third. Time, 0:52.4. Fourth race (owners' handicap), one and a sixteenth miles, Bonnie King won, Al phon.-e second, Hornpipe third. Time, 1:53%. Filth race (selling), one mile, i.oaz won, Chilorvie secoud. Mountain third. Time, 1:30. Memphis Entries. Memphis, April Following are the entries for to-morrow: First race, five-eighths of a mile, for two year-olds—Burr Cooper 110, Ascot 113, Lib erty Bell 113, General Caldwell 113, Bonnie Byrd 115, Linlithgow 118. Second race, three-quarters of a mile heals — Jack Cocks Nil, Tom Stevens 96, Birthday 07. King Koxbury 97, Wiminer 100, Sknbelelt 103, Bertha 103. 'lhird race (Club stakes), for three-year olds, one and a sixteenth miles— Barney 103, Jess Armstrong 104, Marie X 104, Vir ile dOr 106, Joe Walton 112, Hocksey 113. Tho fourth race is an extra race, and the entries will close at 9 o'clock at the scales room on the track. Fifth race (selling), three-quarters of a mile— Armiel 91, Eight to Seven 101, Bon nie Annie 102, Dave Hancock 103, Wimmer 110. Tudor 110. Sixth race (handicap hurdle), one and an eighth miles— Cataline 150, Wiuslow 150, Elpbin 150, Heidelsheim 123. Elizabeth Entries. New York, April 18.— Following are tlie entiles for to-morrow' > Elizabeth races: • First race, tive-riginlis of a mile— Trestle 104, Flambeau 104. Red Elm 117, Sam Morse 102. Lomax 124, Young Duke 124, St. John 119. Jim Gray 119, Bradford 119, Fllzroy 110, .Mist 110, (.old Fish 110, Mucilage 07, Tlpslaff 114, Vil lage Maid 111. Second race, one-halt mile, for two-year-old Bllies— Knlcknac- 315, Bellona 11 filly 115. Tendency lilly 115, Addle 1. 115, Cutalong 115, Fugitive 115, Flozette 115, Glucose 115, Cl.nidino 115, Lizzie 115, Ada B 115, Early Blossom 118, Frh.cllla 118. Third race, threes- quartern of a mile— Ralph Black 102, Ban Lassie 105, Brilliant 88, Nina W 104, E'xpiess 80, Equality 98, Romp 110, Harri son bo, Watch Me 95, Oarsman 103, Planter 109, Moonstone 94, Oracle 83. Fourth race, Quarters of a mile— Slumber 92. Extra 91. Llltle Barefoot 95. Julia Miller 05, Beniialine 90, Count Luna 100, Bmtorsby 100, Short 104, Joe 89. Louise 92, Futurity 97. Boodle 100. Pericles 109, Cupid 04. .--. ' Filth race (Luke Blackburn stake for three year-olds), one mile— King Hazel 122, Jack ltosa 122, W atierson 112, Judge Morrow 122. lUu cocas 122, Kenwood 122. Sam Moore 122, Ad miial 122, Stonemason 122, Century 122. Home- : opathy 117. milii ibii i mpiip, ima-i i iinm*! Sixth race, one and a sixteenth miles— Felham 110, tanner 110, St. Paris 110, My Fellow 110, Leon 116, Martin Rush. 11 110, Undue 110. Seventh race, one mile— Monmouth 111, Dar ling 96. Sbotover 100. Cast Steel 110, Super visor 100. Stephanie 98, Bohemian 110, Royal Carter 110, Larcliiiiont 110, Lady Agnes 91, Ebiis 112, Pontine 102, Topsawyer 106, Refund 105, -il l --"'— HH.'ll i *_-__.'"__l_»J j-llH'n aa_l,*~-|!*ii <_J"_'laHl,i|'-'| There being twenty-seven entries for the third race, It was divided. BavHid'i Tip*. New Yobk, April 18.— Following are Bayard's lips for to-morrow's Elizabeth races: First race, Ham Morse or Tipstaff; second. Prltcllla I or Early Blossom; third, Express or ' Moonstone; fourth, Iheoia or Priceless; Hith, Judge Morrow or Kenwood; sixth, Badge or Martin Russell; seventh, Monmouth or i.a sss Is mo nt. PUBLIC BUILDINGS. I IT 1_ « ... .. A New Measure Reported to the Honse. Tie Government Asked to Erect Hundreds of Postoffices. Final Adjournment of the International • American Congress— Oklahoma Bill Agreed Upon. Special by the California Associated Tress. ; WAsniMTOK, April 18.— The House Com ioit.ee on Postoffices and Postroads has reported a bill providing Postoffice build ings in all towns where the Postoffice re ceipts for two years or more, preceding, have exceeded $3000, and in county seats $2500. The Postmaster-General is author ized to have the buildings erected at his dis cretion. The cost of auy such building shall not exceed $25,000. Where the post office receipts have not exceeded $2500 the buildings shall not cost more than 820,000, and where the receipts have not exceeded 2000 the building must cost no more than $15,000. For such purpose the sum of $2,000, --000 is appropriated. j If the bill passes, which seems likely, as all the Congressmen are interested in it, this will insure buildings at the following cities and towns in California: Alameda, Auburn, Bakersfield, . Benicia, Berkeley. Chico, Colton, Colusa, : Coronado, Eureka, Fresno, Gilroy, Grass Valley, Healdsburg, Hollistcr, Los Angeles. Los Gatos, Marys ville, Merced, Modesto, Napa City, National City, Nevada City, Oakland, Oroville, Pasa dena, Petaluma, Plaeerville, Pomona, Red

Bluff, Redding, Redlands, Riverside, Sacra mento, St. Helena, Salinas, San Bernar dino, San Diego, San Jose, San Luis Obispo, San Rafael, Santa Ana, Santa Bar bara. Santa Clara, Santa Cruz. Santa Rosa, Stockton, Tulare, Ukiafi, Vallejo, Ventura, v isalia, Watsonville, Woodland and Yreka. In tlie State of Oregon— Albany, Ashland, Astoria, Baker City, Corvallis. East Port laud, Eugene, Pendleton, Portland, Salem and The Dalles* State of Washington— Colfax, Dayton, Ellensburg, North Yakima, Olympia, Port Townsend, Seattle, Spokane Falls, Sprague, Tacoma, Walla Walla aud Whatcom. WISDOM'S VIEWS. Ihe Silver Question Discussed by the Senate C m nittee. Washington, April 18.— The Senate Re publican Silver Committee held a meeting this morning, at which Secretary Windom said that the reason for his advocating the redemption in bullion of certificates issued for the purchaee of silver was that it would make the certificates more valuable. To require their redemption In the silver dollars would be, in his opinion, to discredit them, while to require their redemption In gold coin might seriously embarrass the Government. He was willing, however, as a measure of compromise, to give the holder of certificates the option of tho currency in which it should be redeemed. I After the Secretary had given his views upon the bill and the basis of them a dis cussion took place upon the subject of the sufficiency of the circulation. Secretary ; Windom had stated to the committee that -_ho total circulation, $1,420,000,0-0, was an average of $21 70 per capita on the basis of a .5,000,000 population. Actually, however, this sum is subject to a diminution by amounts tied up in various ways, such as reserves held for redemption of notes, etc., so that per capita the amount of circulation was considerably less. The Secretary agreed with the Senators, as he had with the Rep resentatives, that an addition to the circula tion was necessary, but in the conference to-day no definite sum was named- GREAT INTEREST M._NIFESTED. Unusual Proceedings in the Case of Com mander M'Ca'.ia. Wasdinotoj*, April 18.— The interest with which the forthcoming trial of Com mander McCalla is regarded by naval officials here is shown by the detail of Lieu tenant Slayton of the Marine Corps as As sistant Judge Advocate of the court. Lieu tenant Slayton is generally regarded as pos sessing one of the brightest legal minds in the service, and his duties in the office of the Judge Advocate General of the navy, iv which he has been stationed for some years, have fitted him for the careful con duct of a case such as that to be tried in New York next Tuesday. It is not an un precedented thing for an Assistant Judge Advocate to be ordered iuto court, but it is commonly only done when the department feels that the case is an unusually im portant one. It is generally thought at the department that the trial will result in some such punishment for Captain McCalla as suspension for a certain period, such as a year. An acquittal of the charges is re garded as next to impossible. in view of the fact that they were made on the basis of the findings of a court of inquiry, a process that generally means rough sailing for an accused officer. M'KENNA'S STAND. His Criticism of the Tariff BUI Causes a Com- motion in Washington. MSai New York, April 18.— Tbe Post's Wash ington special says: The cloud no bigger than a man's hand, which appeared when McKenna presented his report dissenting from the majority of the Ways and Means Committee on the sugar tariff, has assumed proportions that threaten a storm. It re quired not a little courage to take the stand he did as a member of the committee. Down to the last moment, while a chance remained of inducing bis fellow committee men to change their minds, lie wrestled with them behind closed doors, and when he received their final answer he had little time to throw bis protest into literary shape. It was done in an hour, but it has already caused a commotion among the thinking members of the party. A . desire to carefully read what McKenna's report contained was spread abroad through the House, and the demand for copies has been greater than for either of the other reports. AT AN END. The Final Session of the International Amer- ican Congress. Washington, April 18.— The Interna tional American Congress virtually closed Its work to-day. , There will be a meeting again to-morrow morning to sign the min utes of to-day's meeting. Then the mem bers will call upon the President in a body to announce the completion of tlieir work. Later on Blame will deliver an address to them, bidding them farewell. The trip through the southern section, which was to have begun to-night, has been postponed. They may start to-morrow, or may not un til Monday; this will be decided to-morrow. OKLAHOMA. The Conference Committee Agrees Upon, a Bill A-lmittin*r the New Territory." Washington, April 18.— The Senate and House committees after several , weeks' wrangling over the Oklahoma question have finally agreed on a bill for the admission of the ; new Territory. The conference com mittee has agreed nnd the bill will probably pass the first part of next week. Oklahoma proper and No Man's Laud are included in the new Territory. . The bill provides for Federal and Territorial . officers and fixes Guthrie as the temporary capital until the Oklahoma Legislature "meets. " The Ne braska code of laws is to be in force until Oklahoma can legislate for herself. CONGKESS. THE SENATE. An Inquiry Into the Executive Session Leak- V aire- World's Fair Bill. ' . -Washington, April 18.— In ; the : Senate to-day numerous petitions were presented,' including the usual number favoring the free coinage of silver aud against admitting adulterated teas. . Piatt, by request, Introduced a bill to ad mit New Mexico into the Union. At 12:45 o'clock Dolph moved to go Into executive session and Hawley at once an tagonized it with the World's Fair Bill. On the aye and no vote Dolph's motion pre vailed, the Democrats supporting it. solidly, assisted by nine Republicans. The vote was 32 to 25. Hawley then called up the World's Fair Bill. Cockrell objected to its consideration and it was agreed to make it the first order of business after the morning hour on Mon day next. ___H___s _ In executive session the Senate took up Dolph's Inquiry into the leakage of execu tive session secrets. A resolution was offered to bring the five guilty correspondents before the Senate and if they refused to divulge where they got their information, to punish them for contempt. The resolution was defeated by a vote of 35 to 23. THE HOUSE. A Southern War Claim Bill Causes a Dispute. Private Calendar. Washington, April 18.— In the nouse to day Enloe of Tennessee, rising to a ques tion of personal privilege, sent to the Clerk's desk and had read an article from the New York Press declaring that a gigantic South ern War Claim Bill had been introduced by him. The article further states that Thomas of Wisconsin. Chairman of the Committee on War Claims, had denounced the bill as one of the most infamous jobs which bad ever been foisted upon Congress. Thomas said that he had not censured any member of the committee. He stated that if the bill passed the House It would be infamous, because he thought he could .prove that a number of the claims in the bill were the claims of persons notably dis loyal. Enloe said that the charge In the article that he had brought the bill before the House in a surreptitious manner was a falsehood made by a correspondent. His action in regard to the bill had always been straightforward, and he denounced the article as a slander on the bill and the mem bers of the committee. Thomas reiterated his statement that a mini of the claims in the bill were those if disloyal persons and that a number of them had never been examined by the com mittee. Butterworth moved that the House go Into Committee of the Whole for the consid eration of the Legislative Aopropriation Bill, but the friends of the private calendar mustered sufficient force to defeat the motion— ayes 112, noes 116". Cannon submitted the disagreeing con ference report upon the National Zoo Bill. The report having been agreed to, Can non moved that the House insist upon its amendment, which requires the District of Columbia to bear half "the burden of ex penses of the maintenance of the park. The motion was agreed to— llß to 27. Cannon presented a memorial of the In diana Western yearly meeting of Friends protesting against naval and coast defenses. Referred. Henderson reported the River and Har bor Appropriation Bill, but it was referred to the Committee of the Whole. The House then %ent into Committee of the Whole, Allen of Michigan in the chair, on the^ private calendar. Thomas of Wisconsin offered a resolu tion that the bill be reported to the House with the recommendation. It will be recommitted, with instructions to the Committee on War Claims to Inquire into the loyalty of each claimant. WILL RETIRE. A Report That Johnny Ward Intends to Giye Up Base-Ball. New York, April 18.— A special from Philadelphia says: John M. Ward will re tire from base-ball and go to Europe. His health is undermined on account of his domestic troubles and he is In no condition to play ball. The dispatch is not generally credited here. When Ward left for Boston he was in good health and excellent spirits. When this was reported to Mrs. Ward she was up in arms at once. "The insinuations of Ward or his friends," she declared, "in regard to outside influence causing our separation are utterly unfounded. There is grave cause for it aud I would speak plainly but my lips are closed by a tele gram from my counsel, ex-Judge Ditten hoefer. My interests are in his bands." —___——-—————_________ PEOPLE TALKED ABOCT. Tamagno, the tenor, considers American audiences painfully cold. Lord Tennyson is suffering from bis usual attack of spring gout. Ignatius Donnelly is said to have wholly abandoned bis literary and political ambi tions. Mrs. Kendal has a pretty way of wearing a diamond brooch on the lapel of her dress waist. Vice-President Morton will probably spend much of the coming summer at or near Pittsfield. Muse. Patti, It is said, has an insatiable appetite for stewed prunes, which sbe eats for her complexion. Queen Victoria will be godmother to her new girl in the Duke of Portland's family, and the child will be called Victoria Doto thy. Bayless W. Hanna, late United States Minister to the Argentine Republic, has been in failing health since his return to his home in Indiana. The Empress Eugenic has become very much of a recluse, and is preparing a memorial of the late Emperor Napoleon and the Prince Imperial. The deafness of the Prince of Wales Is Increasing, and Is apparently incurable. It is something of very serious moment to the future ruler of England. The Czar of Russia employs an American dentist to keep him supplied with store teeth. For this reason the Czar knows a thing or two about suffering himself. King Malietoa of Samoa has become quite "chummy" with Robert Louis Stevenson, who seems to be enjoying him self very much on the far-away Pacific island. General B. F. Butler has accepted the in vitation of the Port Royal Society to at tend the twenty-filth anniversary of the restoration of tho Union flag over Fort niter. The Duke of Newcastle is about to sell Worksop Manor, in Nottinghamshire, En gland. This property his grjat-graudfather purchased from the Duke of Norfolk at an enormous price. p__§J Sir Henry Parkes, the Premier of New South Wales, began life as a toy-maker; then he became owner of a newspaper, and now he is toying with the big idea of the independence of the Australian colonies. The Empress of Austria has caused her wedding dress to be cut up and made into a set -of vestments for the Church of St. Matthew, in Pesth. The material is white brocade, with silver threads embroidered with silver roses. Herr J. P. S. Estrup, Prime Minister of Denmark, is a consumptive, weakly looking little man of unprepossessing appearance. During the fifteru years that he has held the premiership lie has ruled the country with an iron hand. . The beautiful Duchess of Marlborough wears three gold bracelets from which three gold keys hang in pendant. Oue opens the lock of her Grace's jewel box, the other be longs to her writing folio and the third to a small satchel, brass bound, in which she keeps her loose money. If IHijIB T.p| Sir Edward Guinness has selected sev eral sites in London for the erection of dwellings for the working classes, which are to differ from the famous Peabody bouses in that they will be let only to the poorest class of laborers and that the rent will be almost nominal.. ;::...'.. A Colossi Couple Divorced. Francis D. and Richard Pattleton were married at Colusa in November, . 1875. Richard deserted In 188 C, and has not since provided for the wife, who was granted a divorce yesterday by Judge Lawler. The daughter, Corn, aged 11 years, will remain with her mother. An Incipient Hl-sz.. The alarm from Box 324, at 8:45 o'clock last night, was for a $50 fire in a three-story frame dwelling, 2814 California street. The fire originated in a room on the too floor and was caused by a gas- jet igniting the wall-paper. . The Lassen Advocate says that one firm in that county lost its : entire baud ot sheep during the winters and that the ranges are marked with carcases of thousands of horses and cattle. FIELD-DAY GAMES. The Amateur Athletic Associa tion Select Officers. John Donaldson Arrives From Honolulu— Dixon and Wallace Will Fight at ths Peli can Club of London. Among the passengers of the steamer Aus tralia, which arrived yesterday from the Ha waiian Islands, was Professor John Donaldson, the man who boxed with Professor Corbett at the Grand Opera House some months ago. Donaldson was seen last evening while con versing with young Mitchell on sporting topics at the tatter's headquarters. He lias changed somewhat ln appearance since last in San Francisco. Ills face is bronzed from exposure to a tropical sun, and tne Incipient mustache be has "raised" while In foreign climes would add to tbe attractiveness of an open and frank countenance bad It not been tampered with by a tonsorial .artist, who Insisted that black hairs under the nasal appendage would be far more becoming to the Professor than the natural red hirsute growth. WELL RECEIVED. In Australia*. Mr. Donaldson was accorded a very cheering reception by the sporting fra ternity, but seeing that the Colonies were over run with professors of all kinds he concluded that he would accept an offer which was made linn at Honolulu eu route to Melbourne and re turned immediately to the Islands. At Honolulu Donaldson taught the manly ait of self-defense to a large class of pupils and would In all prob ability Have made a longer stay in the capital city of the Islands had he not been called away lo bis home in Minneapolis nn business matters which demanded bis attention. He will remain ln this city until after the Smith- Carroll fight and will then start for bis home. AMATEUR ATHLETES. The Pacific Coast Amateur Athletic Associ ation met last evening at the Olympic Club. In the absence of Mr. Scott F. T. Scinlau presided. J. J. McKinuon was reinstated as an amateurs The following officers were appointed to officiate at the championship meetings Referee— E. A. Klx. **• Judges ot track events— J. F.Harrison, T. J. Cutiulii-ham, R. V. Hammond Jr. Judges of field events— Colonel J. C. Edwards, J. A. Hamilton, F. T. Scaulan. Timers— J. A. Hammersmith, Professor F. Soule Jr., George H. Storms, C. Mclvor. Judges of Walking— C. B. Hill, J. J. Theobald. Clerks of the Course- G. W. Jordan, A. T. Allen. F. Bonne] l, C. _. Smith, I". N. _!__!, Starter— G. F. Davidson. Scorer— F. Larkln. DIXON MATCHED. George Dixon, the colored feather-weight champion pugilist, has been matched lo fight Nunc Wallace, the English champion, at ihe Pelican Club of London. England. O'ltnurke, Dixou's manager, received a cablegram yester day from me Secretary of the club staling that bis terms were satisfactory and hat all arrange ments had been made for the match to come olt about the middle of June, the contestants to fight at 114 pounds, the winner to receive $2000 md the loser $500. Dixon will be allowed by the clnb $500 lor expenses. Dixon and bis man ager will leave New York for England un the Ist of amy. Ever since Dixon fought Cat McCarthy a draw the latter has kept exceedingly quiet, having had more than be bargained for when be finished with his opponent, whom be rated a third-class man. ' A LETTER FROM DEUPSE-. A representative of the California Club re ceived a letter yesterday from Jack Uempsey, lv wli 101 l the latter states that the report that be Was about to light "Toll" Wall lv ibis country was false. *' I am uuder contract with the Cali fornia Club," writes Dempsey, "and until that agreement expires I will make no matches with anybody." ■*■__.- The following men met last evening for the purpose of Incorporating a society under the name of the "Coast Kange Athletic Club" : C. T. Kerus, 11. L. Whituey, 11. M. Waterbury, M. 11. Daggett, E. Higgi-is aud Joseph Chappie. T. F. (Jraber Is their attorney. The entries lor the Alpine Amateur Club games, which will be beld at the Bay District Track on May 4th, will close at tue club-rooms, 70G Powell street, ou the evening of April 2Ctn. Tbe Lurllne Boating Club will hold a "high jinks" at its headquarters to-morrow. A cablegram states that C. ('. I'sotta has en tered tor Hie diamond scull contest at Henley. ll Is said that the m Jorlly of the members ot the New Yoik Yacht Club are in favor ot ac cepting Lord Duuraven's challenge for the America cup. That being so. tl Is difficult to undei stand why tbey don't send an acceptance at once and end the talk. A popular movement is said to be on foot In England, wlib good prospects of success, lo make up a ladies' eight- oared team to race over the three-quarters of a mile of the Uuiveisiiy course on the Thames. There ls a considerable purse and the entries are open to all girls under the age of 25. Irrespective of rank. ARTICLES SIGNED. Billy McCarthy signed articles yesterday to fight "Keddy" Gallagher. It is probable that the California Club will bar the "pivot blow" winch has been so successfully used by La Blanche and others. The Directors consider the blow very unpopular and not by any means a fair way ol defeating an oppo nent. A dispatch received yesterday by Professor Corbett's father states that the Olympian has aheaoy left New York for bis borne. Fete McCoy and Johnny Regan will do battle on the evening of May Ist. Ike Weir Is anxious to pay San Francisco another visit. He says that Frisco is a ureal city to make money lv If a pugilist is " on." A. C. Bauta, O. J. Treat and S. H. yon Schmidt, of tbe Palm Leaf Wheelmen of Fresno, are vow In this city. They have traveled 331 miles on their wheels. They will start on their Journey homeward next Tuesday by way of Napa, Sacra memo, aud tin nee lo Stockton and borne. A-TOTHEB DIG AT AMERICAN YACHTSMEN-. Dixon Kemp, iv tbe Field of March 220, has still another die at the owners o[ the American 70- footer who have challenged the owners of the Valkyrie and Yaraua. He says: "As we said last week, it is not a very brave thing to chaileuge a man lo travel 3000 mites to sail a match, aud if the owners of the Katriua, Shamrock anil Tl- de-he to try conclusions with the Valkyrie they should send tbelr yachts to '."owes, where uo doubt iheir challenges would not only be ac cepted by the owner of the Valkyrie, but by the owners of other yachts as well, should they be favoied with a challenge. It is now twenty years since we have had the pleasure of seeing an American skipper In charge, in competition lv our waters, aud ou that last occasion It was the American schooner Sappho, of 400 tons, against the British schooner Cambria, 200 tons, and there was no time allowance. result,how ever, showed that no time allowance then or now in use would have saved the Cambria from defeat, and we only meutlou the fact to Illus trate ihe simplicity ol the conditions. It should also be mentioned that Mr. \V. I*. Douitlas, a New York gentleman, made his challenge iv ibe usual way— that Is, to sail the match lv the waters ol tlie owner challenged. Twenty years ago it was almost Impossible to make terms which were mutually agreeable, because the yachts of the two countries, developed by differ ent rules of rating, were so widely different, and the mention of lime allowance would in conse quence start off the eager contestants on a six months' correspondence. All that Is changed now. Our rating rules are alike ana our yachts are alike— that ls, the British yacht has expanded In beam, while the American yacht has done the same with regard to depth. Our courses arc hel ler than those on the coasts of the United .tales, and in common fairness it Is vow the turn for [lie American yachtsmen to come here and sail a few matches." McLeod, the wrestler, thinks that he would be a belter man to match against Joe Acton than the celebrated Jap, who is now at Seattle. HORRIBLY CRUSHED. A New City Hall Workman Mangled by a Falling Girder. Thomas J. Lenehan, living at 11 Lafayette street, a workman on the Larkin-street wing of the new City Hall, was so horribly crushed by a falling iron girder yesterday that he may lose His life. While moving gilders with a windlass yesterday afternoon be was caught between one which was hoisted in the air and another on the walls and sustained injuries of a fearful nature. The windlass or pulleys slipped and precipi tated the heavy mass of iron upon Lene haii's legs, crushing them in such a manner that both had to be amputated. One was broken uear the hip, the other at the knee, which was twisted into a mass of broken bone and bruised flesh. - The unfortunate man was removed to the Receiving Hospital on an express-wagon for surgical treatment, as the attending physi cian saw that an operation was necessary. Police Surgeon Bunker examined the crushed limbs. He thought to save them, but it was not possible. The opinion with the doctors is that Lenehan will not recover from the shock of double amputation. Lenehan expired at 7 o'clock last even ing as the result of his injuries. More Bnrelars Jailed. Joseph Kelly, Frank Ellsworth, Jack Myers, alias Harry Miller, George Kramer and Edward Wilson were held yesterday by Judge Rix iv bonds of $3000 each for trial for burglary. They broke into a dye works in the Mission and stole about $150 worth of property. What Is the Product? The trial in the case of J. C. Bauer against Timothy Guy Phelps to determine whether an importation, alleged to be rice, ; was. rice, rice meal or rice flour, is on in the United States Circuit Court before Judge Sabin and a jury. ■- 1 __j*S_gg_ffi3S Jtaffelli Acquitted. Frank Raffelli was placed on trial yeater day before : Judge ; Murphy and a jury for the t second > time on . a charge _of having stabbed S. Gio vaii-*-.:* on January 9. 1889. The parties bad a dint ...lty aud settled it •^ -_^'***?^-^s / */^'__!^««^.'^ $ A THRILLING NOVEL! yf £THE ACE OF CLUBS !£ T JX THS V* )xSUNDAY CALL!% PRICE FIVE CENTS. apparently. Raffelli passed Giovannlnl's saloon a short time afterward and the quar rel was renewed, resulting in the cutting. The defendant claimed that the act *___* done in self-defense and the jury evidently thought so. too, for it acquitted him. MEMORIAL DAY. Committees Which Will Arrange for Its Observance. Representatives from the city posts of £__ Grand Army of the Republic, constituting a Memorial Day Committee, met last even ing at B'nai B'rith Hall, on Eddy street; and after calling the meeting to order Chairman Salomon announced the appoint ment of the following-named committees: Parade and Finance— J. H. Brady s('haii*-_-_-*_ J. T. Cutting, H. Uobert, A. E. Leavilt, K. Mer rick, James Klpp, W. 11. L. Barnes. Salomon -alien, W. W. Williams, W. J. Kuddick. F. Cuaj liilngs, .7. J. Alkln, J. Smedley,_J. 11. ltiley. Decorations— M. Murphy (Chairman). J. 11. Babbitt, James Klpp, E. E. Cbeaver, W. U. Park, E. Hen E. Brooks. Press and Printing— E. Cohen. H. Robert. W. G. Lee, W. M. Wllll.inis, P. M. Bolton. J. J. Alkln, T. Staller, W. H. Park. Music- E. Brooks (Chairman), J. Smedley, _. H. Babbitt, A. E. Leavilt, J. U. Page, L. _t_ Can-, J. H. Kiley. Day Programme and Exercises at Cemetery— W. W. Slow (Chairman), Sol Cahen, M. Lane, JL J. Acton, F. Cumuilugs, F. K. Staleler, H. __r nckson. Evening Programme— C. A. Summer, A. Bran, J. F. Cutting, S. Howell, E. S. Salomon. W.J. Kuddick, J. H. Page. Transportation— aM. Lane, W. G. ]__, ___a Murphy, O. M. Mcois, S. M. Carr, M. J. A_._s, 8. Howell. IROQUOIS CLUB. Resolutions Adopted Favoring CaloeM Enumeration. The Iroquois Club met in St. George's Hall last night. Two resolutions amending the constitution were adopted. The first provided for the appointment of a standing committee on resolutions, and the second for the prevention of indiscriminate dona tion of the club funds for charity. Max Popper stated his intention of visit ing the southern part of this State to assist in the organization of branch clubs, and then presented the following resolutions: Whereas, It appears from dispatches lately received that a small number of meichants aasl members of the Chamber of Commerce of Nev York, and engaged lo the China trade In co.v .iniciloii with the financial agents of mission aries wbo are striving to accomplish impossi bilities, have succeeded in pi eventing i_a passage of the Chinese Enumeration Bill In Congress; be It Jtesolved, By the Iroquois Club of San Fra_ cisco, that we, the members thereof, look uoon i__ provisions of snd bill as absolutely necessary he enforce a total exclusion of the Chinese and pre vent the luture evasion of Ihe successful enforce ment of the benlflcent Scott exclusion law by lax decisions of our Federal courts, and sup press I lie Illicit trade now carried on by open violations upon our borders, by violators la human form that deserve the severest uunlsn ment for their Illegal acts. Be it therefore Jtesolved, That we request our delegation Ig Congress to forthwith reintroduce the Chinese Enumeration BUI, and use all their influence and ' extend energetically their aid toward placing upon our statute-books the only legislation re quired to properly provide protection for unaided labor upon the Pacific Coast; and Jtesolved, Tbat a copy of these resolutions be sent to each and every Iroquois Club In Califor nia for their consideration, and if adopted that they with this club telegraph a copy io the Hon. a T. J. ciuiile. who shall be requested to present the same lo Congress. The resolutions were adopted, and the meeting adjourned after initiating four candidates. _. N(itlon„l Club meeting. An enthusiast}* n. Celine of the National Club was held on Thursday even__g ______^ club-rooms, and speeches were made by _ number of prominent men. Twelve new members signed the roll, and the sense of the meeting was that all else must give way to the interests of harmony. Forty-sixth District. The Democrats of the Forty-sixth As sembly District organized last Wednesday evening at 406 Third street by the election of the following officers: President, Frank J. McDermott; Vice-President, William H. Harrison Recording Secretary, George H. Thomas; Financial Secretary^ Thomas F. Mullee; Treasurer, Daniel Slavln; Ser geant-at-Arms, James McCauley. UNION LEAGUE CLUB. Senator Stanford, the Governor and Others Will Be Dined. The Union League Club gave one of Its pleasant reunions last night to a large num ber of friends, about 100 covers having been laid. While the guests were dining a band of music in the hall sent sweet strains into the banqueting chamber to add to tbe enjoyment. The officers of the club are W. H. Cham-, berlaln, President; W. H. Crocker, First Vice President; Wendell F. Easton. Second Vice President; John S. Mumaugh, Secre tary anil M. H. de Young, Treasurer. Next Wednesday night the club will en tertain a large number of the distinguished men of the State. Among others. President Chamberlain, as the representative of the National League of the Republican clubs of tho State, has issued invitations to the officers of the various clubs and members of the Republican National Committee. Sena tor Stanford, Governor Waterman and the presidents of the Union League clubs of Los Angeles and San Diego will be among • the guests. For the first time the Republican Club of California finds itself in a position to dine its San Francisco Central Committee in its own house, and if it does not do honor to it self on this occasion it will not be for lack of desire to do so. The house will be elab orately dressed with tbe floral wealth of California, and an excellent band of music will be In attendance. Oue hundred and fifty invited guests have signified their in tention of being present. The club is now in a very prosperous con dition. Weekly accessions are being made to its membership, and last night tbe bul letin-board contained the names of twenty one applicants. Every two weeks the club will dine its members for the purpose of promoting sociability, good feeling and a mure extended acquaintance. Their finan cial standing is such that they have selected a site, and will shortly commence the erec tion ot a palatial building for their occu pation. . THE GUMP SALE. Trices Realized— The S.-ale to Ua Con- tinned To-day. Quite a number of pictures were sold at the auction of the Gump collection last night, the best price brought being for the exterior of a Hindoo mosque by the Amer ican artist, Edwin Lord Weeks. This picture, after some spirited bidding, was knocked down for $1100. The interior of an Abrabian mosque, by R. Weisse, in the style of Gerome, went for $875. In all, aside from the two mentioned, about a dozen pictures were disposed of, varying in price from $30 to $300 each. .s: The sale realized $11,000, making" _'c total to last night, $30,000. Yesterday buyers evideutly appreciated the rare opportunity to secure pictures from the famous studios of Paris and Munich without shaving to travel for them and bring the paintings here at large expense. As three days were not sufficient to complete the sale satisfac torily, a peremptory auction sale will be held to-day at 2:30 o clock, in Irving Ball, when the remaining pictures will be sold. CHhaCKS, BUT NO COIN. . A Speculator Charged With Obtaining Money by False fr-tenS-fl. Detective Bee last night arrested G. Puis, chew, the proprietor of a tea-store, 9s7 Mar ket street, and charged him at the Central Station with obtaining money by false pre tenses. The prisoner is accused of giving broker Thomas J. Atkinson checks drawn on the Uulon Trust Company to cover mar gins amounting : to $3400. Upon presenta tion of the checks by one of the firm's clerks they, were found to be worthless, inasmuch as Pulschew did not have the amount out deposit to cover the checks. The firm ascertained that Pulschew had disposed of $1200 worth of stock tlunugb the medium of another firm, and they swore out a warrant for the : speculator's arrest. His bail was fixed at $4000. A Servant'- Neglect. Charles E. Haseltine, the stevedore, be gan suit yesterday against Mary Johns, a domestic formerly in bis employ, to recover $25. ' He alleges that through her negligence and carelessness his infant son, Ebin B. Haseltine. was iniured and permanently crippled. The money sued lor represent* the amount expended let a physician* services and medicines. Arbitrary Statements. Next week will be the last for filing state ments '■ of personal . property with the As. sessor, . wbo ■; will ' thou v male* arbitrary ratings.^ajAjjUJWHM

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