2 Ocak 1873 Tarihli The Toledo chronicle Dergisi Sayfa 1

2 Ocak 1873 Tarihli The Toledo chronicle Dergisi Sayfa 1
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•i r/v-i. .K 'T Vol. VII, No. 1. FIRST NATIONAL BANE TAMA CITY. IOWA l|» Hail, a. II. Pres, m. WABBBN, .fcABBlSOB. fe. 1. If ALL, O.H.WAKBIf. "**AMA COUNTY BANE, —o*— foledot Iowa. K4B3I30N, HALL it WAH8SN, BANKEB8 Correspondent e: Konntse Brothers, New y, »"d Third National Bank, Chicago. WM. H. HARRISON, r-lkfteral Insurance I n*ESOAPS, Ageirt," id* A. Represents the CHARTER OAK I.IFE INSURANCE CO.. OF HARTFORD. A.SSE2TS $10,000,000 4*4 ike following reliable fir* Insurance Companies: jBtna, of Hartford, assets $0.000,000 Borne, of Hew York, assrtl 5,000.000 Yartford, of Hartford, assets 2,7.10,000 Flissnii, of Hartford, asset* 1,785,000 8peoial attention will he given to in*ur ng DWKLLINOS, 1URN8 and CONTENTS •gainst FIRR and LIQI1TNINQ, for a pori 4 of One, Three and Fivo years, and ai mt** at Jew a* any on* can posiibli/ gitt. HFFICB—In Tama Countjr Itank. M. BK1GKB. I 8F.RGER JACOB TK1SBB, 8 & YEISER, (8aocess(rs to T. K. AiniUroug ^Wholesale and retail dealers 1b XiB-UGS, "KKDICINRS, and CHEMICALS. PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES AND j| DTE STUFFS, LAMPS, ri'TTT, GLASS, Jte. u e y TOILET PftEPARA- HONS. TBCSP*?, SJIOULDXR-BRACSS, Ac., Ac TOBACCO. SNUFF, and OIGARs. UP.rSfTES of all kinds and stolen, and every thing nrually kepi in a flrst-olass l)rug Store. ffjT* Fhysiciaa's Prescriptions carefully compounded. 1'OLEDO. IOWA. BLANKS.—BLANK DEEDS, MORTGA GKS, Quit Claims and Justios* Blank »t the CUHOIIICLE Office, DO Tor WANT a superior article otj Wool len Tarn and some extra heavy Flan nets Irom the German Mills, then call lithe UNION STORK. DO YOB WANT some new plain or figured Opera Flannel, heavy Water Proof, fancy Scotch Plaids, Merinoa or oth er serviceable Drees Goods, call thon •t tbe UNION STOKE. no •orae good (/eana, ha**'J :ni Cassimere, Broadcloth, or Beaver—you wiU ^hcVT^ONStoRE. lebrated iv WAS* wool ... UNION v nn Casbifr -_ A. L. Hooanroit, Asst. Cashier. f^F* We *of4 to all of a ur Customers. ^Bt Hew York Correspondent, Chatham Na tlenal Dank, £hieaco Correspondent, Manufacturers' fcAtionalitaak. [i7 TABLE POCKET )VU K tome fin® iUlW if °l w\£i"cfotWog, b».U0MAl w beBl DO not know that the »b0\«»*"jj ,od» and many others 1»«J jen newly purchased, ami »re kred to the public at the verj10* (rices, at the UNION STORE1" lo, Iowa, by tho pioprieton, dieting Br^ WT OAMER^ DEALER IN Maohlnery of all kinds ^4 ftp Paper, John Deere's Plo^" add Hardware, s V BOOKS & STATIONERY, Memorandum Books, Miscellaneous BoQks, School Books, Blank Books, P@cket Books, Writing Paper of various descriptions, IKTITIAL NOTE), P®us, ink, Pencils, Mucilage, Ink Stands, Pap?r Weights, Paper Cutters, Ink Erasers, Pen Hacks, Clips, Stationers' Gum, Visiting and Playing Cards, Rulers, Slates, Chalk Crayons, &c., &e. CITY BOOK STORE, Toledo, Iowa. NOW ON EXHIBITION A MAMMOTH STOCK For the Fall Trade! OOMPR.ISIBTO DOMESTIC DRY GOODS & DRESS GOODS, IN LARGE VARIETY. READY-M A DE CLOTH IN G, IK)OT8 ANI) SHOES, HATS AND CAPS, w% .mftii it if'v PEN%^ Toy Books. QUE KN S WARE, II0SIEKY & GLOVES, GLASSWARE. WHITE GOODS, LACES, NOTIONS, Aiming to keep pace with all movements whose object is to make low prices, ami to encourage the handling of Goods of superior manufacture, I solicit an examination from the best judges and the closest buyers. H. GALLEY. DEEDS, MORTGAGES Por Sale AT THIS OFFICE. THE PEOPLE'S STORE W. F. JOHNSTON & CO., Have now open and 011 exhibition, the Largest Stock of General Merchandise in Tama County, consisting of Domestic and Fine Dress Goods, Heady Made Clothing, Boots and Shoes, Glass and Queens Ware, Hats and Caps, Groceries, Hardware and Aorioal tui al Implements, Umbrellas. Parasols and nsroTioisrs OF1 ALL ikzihstids. Slmwls, Marseilles Quilts, Wall Paper, Ac., Ac., which they are prepared to sell at LOWEST prices for CASH. Aiming to lead in all movements, having for their object SMALL PROFITS and Quick Hetarna, and to furnish to the people ot Tama County Goods ot the Best Quality and Manufacture at greatly reduced marginal Biotits, they would solicit an examination of their itock, coi ident that they caw give Both as to QUALITY and PRICE. i. f» JOHNSTON AND CO. *^3teMHU6iue^: ^oicd* ^ronicle. Is published eterjr ThaffSajr morning by M. B. C. TRUE. If paid ttrictly in advanff tho subscription price of the CIIRONICLB will be $2.00, Cull Oh Girls! Diogenes wandereJ, a long tims ago, In the streets sf old Athens, as maybe you know Frtm the court an4 tbe hall, te the eetand tho camp, A noonday, through sunlight, yet oarried a lamp. The young men all shoutsd as lemstlmes they will T.- their elders, though often they'd better keep still, Say, whit are yon after Di, W%*t Weuld a mile (Yum town you find Are yen looking for 'natter, motion or mind The old cynic paused, held his taattrn up high' Flashed forth a contemptuous glance of liis eye: I am trying lo find, but I mean 8HAWI* CUTLEIIY, GROCERIES, TOBACCO, £*c., this s*tns kc. &c. cyBie'who hit last eaoors Luman I' TOLEDO, TAMA COUNTY, IOWA, THURSDAY, JAN. 2, 1873. Whole No., 31$. $1.75 year otherwise It will be and no subscription will be allowed to rua over two years unpaid. Office on High Street, East of Tasia Coun ty Bank. Bates of Advertising. 1 Inch, lweek $ .80 1 Incj, 1 month .1 2.00 1 Inch, 6 months e»*|rjf»»»*« «j» 4.00 1 Inch, 1 year.....jw,».M.^. €. to I Column. 1 y-ar.i«*#r#«»iWB. 12.80 Lotiimn. 1 Column, 1 year V/. 28.W) i Column, 1 year 41.40 1 Column, 1 year .?. 80.00 Lognl advertising, at legal rales. For the use of large cuts and wood type an additional charge, varying from 10 to 20 percent., will be miule. Prompt settlements will be expee'ed with all time-advertisers, at the close of each calender quarter. Transient advertise ments must, be paid for in advanoe. doubt if I can, With you as a sample of mankind—a man 1' And hick went tho party, back from the Greek hub They went to their duties, and he to his tub This moment is flniehed, with tfreece we are through, And are brought now to sossewhsre seven two. A* was stnnding alone, er hie visible gliosl I scarcely can tell whiok Wtll he beJev cd ir.oit For 1 sneered Long sgo, somewhat longer than two thousand years, f{# watched as the gay groups of girls wan dered by, With their flummeries sn and their hair done up high. With thoir paniere and ruffles, 'heir sashes aud frills, And their three-button gloves that lulp run up big bills Their cane parasols, aud thsir boots with high heels, A nd their—oh at th« sifM #f it how bis brain rsels He turned te a man who tltea Stood by his side: "I returned from Elysium, where I reside: To look at the earth and see how she gets on, What ill things are finished, what good oacs begun. W,uld 70 1 tell if you ploase, what those strsnge creaturos are "Where?'' "There goes one now with that frowsly hair.', He answers. Di starts, for he says 'tis a woman. "Oh, man of this age, yea eae't auaa It is "Why, you sure outght. to sse —she is Greek, every spesk Grecian bead Orfeian twist, a*4 her curls a la Orte." Net a bit »f it," oriss he "you libel mi land, And tho womankind too I IIow eatt that ereature stand And she thinks ske is graceful and olassio!. Ah me Thitlshoull return that as w^unantosee'* I sought once for men, and I found only beys, And now for ths women I see gatidy toys. Is mankind a faroe and humanity blind That a type of the re ee in no age I oan flad?' tie finished and vanished. Oh, girls, lovely ftrts, With your crimps fcnd your braids, with your rolls and your eurls, And the rest that is pretty, I know how it is That you wear tfcat style first and yon thsn assume this! You want to look graceful—I knew all that well— I'm a girl, and a girl's wish I surely ean tell. But, girls, can't we try not too much to as tound, Should a orowd of old cynics rise up from the ground Can't wo keep all the grace and the beauty, and yet Not too'faron the side of the false aim to get? Can't we (j[irls, may I preaeh just a little sitting-room, to you?) Remember that life has much good werk to do? Do n't abandon the beauty, but nevertheless Remember you're put here to please and te bless. Oirls, take up the blessing, for chance you must fini, And do n't let the dressing take up all your mind. —[Editor's Drawer, in JUrptr'i Mafftzim for January. Divorced. 1 He'll go to the dogs now.' O!*couree he will By all means. Only see how he acted when his wite lived with htm Now that nhu'a leti hiin, and all re straint removed, he'll go the rest of the downward w»y no time. Poor Nettie! I wonder she stood it to long.' a I'll K'tve him just one year to be buried.' Pshaw half that time will finish him,' 4 VVell, pity him too, bin I pity her more. Ha brought misery on both.' Such was the gossip of half a doz "n villagers who stood in the front ol one ot the principal stores, ono sum But Harry Itodgcr* ln» carried on at a fearful rate tor a y ,ar or But wonders never ceaso when they get a start. He was next re ported as actually at work on his farm. Had but one man seen this, and told it in the village, he would have been marked as a man lacking veracity but a number of ladies saw it and told it, and their combined testimony was worthy of all cre dence. The little tarm began to look healthier as the summer worn on.— The fenco straightened up the weeds disappeared tho corn grew marvelously the briars and elders were rooted up from tho fields and tencerows the animals looked latter, sleeker, and happier, and tho cottage looked neater. Time wore on, and the great change was the more strangely to inarkahle each day. Harry's credit ors oalleil aud told him they would not be hard on him, and he might have his own time paying his debts and clearing his farm ot tho raort RnKe- The fall came, and the farm yield ed an abundance of golden corn and fruits such a crop indeed as it had never produced before aud Harry tound liiinselt beginning to drill along with a tide of prosperity. And Nettie Ray had begun to live her young girlhood over again, as it were under her father's 100I but. somehow, it was not like the happy, joyous girlhood ot memory. It was sober and quiet now, and Nettie tell into trains ot musing every now and then there passed through her mind a certain thought—she was neither ma nor wite. She avoided the vicinity of her late home, nor ha 1 she had heard of him occasionally knew that I10 was a changed man. Still this knowledge brought hoi* a melancholy satisfac tion. Tho reform had come too lato —too late There was a wide gull between them now. But, one evening in the golden Oc tober, Nettie found herself obliged to pass Harry's farm. It lay between her father's hou^e and the village but she had heretolore taken a round about road in going to and from the village. On the evening in q'lestmu, however, she had been detained in the village unconsciously lill it was nearly dark, aud she determined to hazr the nearest road home. It would be fully dark when she would pass his house, and tho chances wore that he would not see iter. She wouldn't have him see her for the world. When she arrived opposito the house, she perceived a light in the Iier first impulse was to hurry by but some powerful in fluence prompted her to stop. She did so, and stood timidly at the fur ther side of the road, gazing longing ly at the house that had been a home tor her--first ot happiness, then ot misery. By and-by she felt an irre Bistable yearning to look at the inte rior of the room onoe more. He was evidently within, and there was no danger that he would see her. So she walked across the road, opened lawn. Another moment, and sha wan at tho window. What sinscalor behavior But she could not help it. The little room was as neat as when shu had herself watched over it. fk cheerful fire wa* burning in the gr »te, although it was not very cold and a lighted lamp on th« tabic. It was there that Ilarry was sitting. How her heart bounded as Bhe caugh sight of him He held in his right hand a book from bis scanty library. She recognized it at once, but he was not readioft now. lie had al lowed it to drop, with its open pa&es looking mutely to the ceiling—and bin (acu was supported, halt conceal oil in tbe left hand, th! elbow resting Avemn?. while th® subject ot on iIm table. Wfts he asleep—or their remarks went elaggcring along was ho buried iu sad reverie .Set on the opposite side. tie thought that tbe latter was the It is evident he was trying to walk case, and her heart was touched straight, i'tid not to appear intoxicat ed, but sue.1* endeavors always suem to make a drunken man walk more crooked. Web', it. proved one thing that ne was not K.'st to all sense ot shame—that he still retained a little pride, and a lingering aversion to be ing ridiculed and dtspi*1*- I wish I had borne with him,' she said. But a moment later her lipart was touched, when she saw a tear roll down his choek, and drop upon the book. Tho lonely man was not asleep—he was crying She could not help it. All that w.ts wotnanlv iu her heart was arousn and she was at tho door in a moment. No ceremony—she burst into the •itting-room und waa at his side. 'Oh, Harry!' two past. Ho had just one vict*—drink —but that was enough. He ha.'l mar ried a worthy tanner's daug.^^fi Nettie Kay, only a few years pre.v'* urse seemed to be left her. thought ot tho Her vuice quivered with emotion, ously, and such had been his conduo^ i •Vhy, Nettie!'' ho exclaimed, try during more than a year past that 11.*3 to hide hia tears, men are ashamed she, seeing nj hope ot" rulonn, had ot tl.ie,n—'Is—is it you?' been obliged to etu him loose to pur-1 'Yv1*, Harry,' holding her face in sue his profligate i-ourse alone and a her hatu^8, ^as passing—looked legal separation had just been eftcc- in—I saw vou te l. It was sad, ideed, but no other and could" *?ot .,,e,P Harry's homo was on a littlo farm,' happy here, and— He owned it,but Then her own »womanly tears 1 then it was heavily mortgaged, and oould be repressed no There in another year foreclosure was cer-' was no use trying to hidi.' them.— lain. It was not likely his creditors Besides, her roioo broke do\T° *Ut'

would spare him when lie made no shu could say no morn just then, effort to meet his obligations, and1 'Nettie,'ho arose, and took both' spent his iime in riotous aud disgrace- hands from her lace and held them tul conduct. j„ his own, 'I thought you had blot- A week passed after that summer 1 ted ine out of yotir memory.' evening ou which all had agreed in 'No.no, Harry,' she sobbed. 'I predicting his early ruin—two weeks! could not help leaving you, but I left —three weeks—a month or two. you loving you more thac ever. Oh What a strantro mvstcrv is here To 1 h!4ve been unhappy.' a strungo mystery the utter bewilderment of tho proph esymg sages, Harry discontinued vis iting the tavern, and was rarely ever seeu in tho village. When ho did come in the store, ho speedily trans acted business and then went home— sober. *itt»"g hero so lonely, uorainK happy 'Nettie, you have heard that I—' Y-es, I have heard that v»u have changed—that you do not drink any more—that you are again manly, and industrious as you used to bp, but how lonely you must be here?' And thu tears gushed forth anew, as hot heart fell what hore lips spoke. 'Y'es, I'm lonely Nettie, more so than you may think, but I de*ervo this punishment for the way I have acted. I had uo discouragements, I had nothing to make me do so. It was ouly passion for drink, that it seemed impossible for me to over come. Yrouwer«all a wife should and could be. When you left me I thought I should hecotuo more reck less than ever. Only a day or two after I know you had left mo for good, I was in town drunk, and I heard some village people, they thought I couldn't hear them across tho street—passing all sorts of re marks about tne, saying that now I was a doomed man, certain, that my destruction was near. Although in loricate j, it startled me, aud for the first time I felt the full force ot our separation, and realized that ruin stared me in the face. 1 had a bot tie of whiskey in my pocket at the time, am? wh?n I went out of town I smashed it,, bathed my face in a little Stream by the roadside, and resolved nevwi to touch whisky again. I had tried it long enough to know that I weuld not drink and be tomperate.— It was hard to keep my resolve tor the first week or two, but I stood it, aud would not touch it if it ran in streams. Now, Nettio, if you love mo the same, let us get married over again, ami the bitter experience ot the last two years will only enhance our happiness. Nettie, dear, what do you say She could not answer, sha was cry ing as if her heart would break, and her head was pillowed upon his breast. It was a more eloquent 'Y'es' than she could have spoken with the tongue. The moon was rising, and it nevor lookfcd so happy as it did while walk ed home with Nettie. So Harry ltodgers and Nettie Ray were maried again, and there is uo diveco that could separate them now. Educating Girls. Educating girls for household du ties ought to be considered as neces sary as induction in rending, writ ing and arithmetic, and quite as uni versal. We are in our houses more than half of our existence, and it is tho household surroundings which effect most largely the happiness or misery of domestic lite, it the wite knows how to "keep house," it dhe link learned how things ought to be cooked, how beds should be made, how carpets should be swept, how furniture should be dusted, how the clothes should be repaired, and turn ed, and altered, and renovated if she knows how purchases can be made to the best advautage, and under stands the laying in ot provisions how to make them go tbe farthest and last the longest if she appreci ates the importance of system, order, tidiness, and the quiet management ot children and servants, then the knows how to make a heaven of home bow to win her children from tho gate, and softly stepped into the the street bow 10 keep h«r husband from the club-house, the gaiming ta ble and wine cup. Such a family will be trained to social respectabil ity, to business success, and lo if* ficiency and usefulness in whatevlf position may bo alloted to them. It may be sato to say, that not one girl in ten, in our large town® and cities, enters into married life who has learned to bake a loaf of bread, to purchase a roast, to dost a paint ing, to sweep a carpet or to cut and tit and make her own dress. IIow much tho perfect knowledge of the60 things bears upon the thrift, the com fort. and health of families may be conjectured, bnt not calculated by figures. It would be an immeasur able advantage to make a beginning by attaching a kitchen to every girls' school in the nation, and have les sons given dart/ 111 tWo preparation ot all the ordinary articles of food aud drink for j,he table, and how to purchase them in the market to the best advantage, with the result of a large saving ot money, an increase of comfort, and higher health in every family in the land—[Hall's Journal. Vote by Counties^ Tho State Registtr publishes tho following table ot tho vote of the Slate of Iowa at the late election by counties. No returns are recoivep from O'Brie County,—tho vote of that county in 1871 was 45 Republi can and uo!)® ioi1 the Dcruociats 6 A I w^eu we w«re Adair Adams Allamakee Appanoose Audubon Benton 757 870 Muscatine O'Brien Osceola Page Palo Alto Plymouth Pocahontas Polk 211 245 1,455 l,5i8 184 2,510 1,381 897 146 909 808 788 462 863 59 431 95 116 231 927 16£ 110 501 482 5 3_ 2,097" 2,364 229 564 1,255 885 981 2,029 61 3,460 68 1,005 406 151 1,292 112 112 360 219 53 502 623 1,242 172 116 13 9C6 1,857 946 1,134 1,882 1,236 1,361 119 2,843 1,445 715 698 1 946 1,176 1,810 368 683 858 176 558 453 1,422 Black Hawk 2,477 Boono i^i'emcr BucVnnn Buena V is'ta Butler Calhoun Cat roll Cass Cedar Cerro Gordo Cherokee Chickasaw Clark Clay. Clayton Clinton Crawford Dallas Davis Decatur Delaware Des Moines Dickinson Dubuque Eiumett Fayette Floyd Franklin Fremont Greene Grundy Guthrie Hamilton Hancock Hardin Harrison Henry Howard Humboldt Ida Iow« Jackson Jasper Jefferson Johnson Jones Keokuk Kossuth Leo Linn Louisa Lucas Lyon Madison Mahaska Marion Marshall Mills Mitchell Monona Monroe Montgomery ...J 4 150 25 21 28 55 7 38 35 13 1,414 1,490 1,877 51» 1,4m 840 410 e?8 2,225 906 463 1,120 1,035 __574 2,298 8,096 420 1,620 1,582 1,283 1,880 2,501 317 2,424 208 2,251 1,620 865 66 69 60 27 3 46 22 1 4 68 82 1 28 1,261 740 757 986 862 186 1,789 1,160 2,607 772 403 82 1,493 1,884 2,848 1,765 2,109 2,285 1,852 519 2,907 3,373 1,&03 1,118 87 1,758 2,532 2,241 2,246 1.169 1,226 571 1,2(15 987 2,145 2 117 4 10 6 1 14 97 6 102 34 61 4 17 16 4 54 2 18 48 15 41 76 68 10 7 7 39 4 11 202 9 1,408 249 469 •263 3 051 717 196 141 68 1,473 1,150 557 215 48 2,648 138 117 347 740 433 296 1,348 1,646 791 1,220 838 780 16 949 4S9 89 85 Pottawattam' 1 451 Poweshiek 1,956 Ringgold Sac Scott Shelby Siout Story Tama Taylor Union Van Buren Wapello Warren Washington Wayne Webster Winnebago Winneshiek Woodbury Worth Wright §7 66 167 804 396 2,360 370 316 1,290 1,931 1,122 796 1,866 2,131 2.12T 2.14# 1,214 1,076 276 2,047 790 406 420 49 16 24 ut U 13 14 II I Total 180,160 71,121 2.2031 Grant's majority over Greeley Grant's majority over both t« 1 Greeley and O'CeWff -c 'I--* :2s® •*3 I**: lit, 1 -i 1 -1 i -%r aff V-v tsS**

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