9 Ocak 1873 Tarihli The Toledo chronicle Dergisi Sayfa 1

9 Ocak 1873 Tarihli The Toledo chronicle Dergisi Sayfa 1
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v\J k •IMP f*» .] tot Sri! FIRST NATIONAL BANE TAMA CITY. IOWA. B. A- HAIL, Pros. Q. it. IWMI TAMA WAIIM,Cashier. A. L. HOUOHTO*, Asst. Cashier. yfo rofs to all of o ur Customers. Hair TorkJ Cor reap )rident, Chatham Na- Bank, Cbieago Correspondent, Manufacturers' Katioaal Bank. [i7 .•A»»I«O». k. 4.BALL, A.i. WAKRSM. COUNTY BANK, —6»— i?olodo. I o w a SASBISON, BALL ft WASBEN, BANKEES Correspondents: Kountie Brothers, New York, and Third National bank, Chicago. WN. H. HARRISON, General Insurance Agent, TOLEDO, IOWA. Represents ifct CHARTER OAK LIFE INSURANCE CO.. OF HARTFORD A9SHT3 S10.000.000 AN1 Ike fellowiug reliable Fire Insurance Companies: JBtna, of Hertford, assets $0,000,000 Home, of New York, assets 5,000.000 *:tfjrd, of Hertford, asseti 2,7.10,(100 rti4siiii, ef Hertford, sssets l,7S6,0()u Speeial attention will be given to Insul in tW ELLIN (IS. UAPvN'R and CONTEN I'S egtinst F1RK and MO IITNl NO, for a peri of One, Three and Five yeare, and a. •it$i mi leu as any rw can /lottihli/ givt. OFfICS In T*m» County Hank. i -i' H. mnaKtt. jixin tusiii, jk MERGER & YEISER, (Suecesstrs to T. K. Armstrong Havit ftonude" 1 1 AtalofS in of any si. ohoaper i H.UC3WS, way. deiiri 11^'it,dKA.31 aud CHEMICALS. l'AlNTS, the lowest (MLS, VARNISHES AMD DTK STUFFS, llrs, PUTT* C.LA3S, to. jrfumery, TiflkicfAPS, TOILET FAIiPAIU- flONi. VteBSXi, S«0Ul,DK«-BRAr *8, Ae., kc TOBlCOO. BNUFF, ib4 blOARa. (SrSIIES of all kinde and styles, and every thing usually kept in a flrst-olass Drug Store. Mr Physician's Prescriptions carefully compounded. 1"0LED0. IOWA. BLANKS.—BLANK DEEDS, MOKTGA GES, Quit Claims and Justice'* Blank at the CtmoNirt.ic Office, W(* WANT a superior article olj Wool len Yarn'and some extra heavy Flan tiels Irutn the German Mills, then call at tho UNION sTOUK. DO ^Toc WANT forae new plain or figured Opera Fianoel, heavy Water Proof, 4ancy Scotch Plaids, Merino* or oili er serviceable Dress Goods, call ther. •I the UNION STORK. no TOP %1HT some good •Titans, heavy Satinet, firm Cassimere, Broadcloth, Alaska Cloth, or Beaver—yon will them at tha UNION STUBS. no Toe WiKT the celebrated Whitney Boo*, for men or boys, or wool lined Boots or new «.lyle Alaska overshoes, Water Proof Gaiters, lvid,. Calf or •ny other shoe, elbow vour way iuto lOit'UNION STORE. DO YON WAKT somo fine suits of good substantial Clothing, some choice 'Groceries, or a line ot best Crockery, don't buy them until you have ex turned Roods and fig* res at the UN ION STORE. DO YOTJ not know that the above named Seen oods and many others have just newly purchased, and arc of ferea to the pui»lio #t the very lowest prices at the UNION STORE, To­ ledo, Iowa, by tho proprietor's, Wieting Bros'. Nl. CAMERY, DEALER IN iMBL Machinery 6f all kinds. Pumni. ""ntsr BOOKS & STATIONERY, Memorandum Books, Blank Books, Pocket Books, lifted 5.^ Writing Paper of various descriptions, I3NTITIAL NOTES, Pens, Ink, Pencils, Mucilage, Ink Stands, Pap:r Weights. Paper Cutters, Ink Erasers, Pen Hacks, Clips, Stationers' Gum, Visiting and Playing Cards, llulers, Slate», Chalk Crayons, &c., &c. CITY BOOK STORE, ToledO, Iowa. NOW ON EXHIBITION I MAMMOTH STOCK For the Fall Trade! COM3PR.IS DOMESTIC DltY GOODS & DRESS GOODS, IN LARGE VARIETY. READY-MADE CLOTIIIXG, BOOTS AND SHOES, HATS AND CAPS, 1I0SIEKY & GLOVES, WHITE GOODS, LACES, NOTfOXS, TABLE ft POCKET CUTLERY, GROCERIES, 't tl 4 doqwa SolcJio Vol. VII, No. 2. TOLEDO, TAMA COUNTY, IOWA,^THURSDAY, JAN. 9, 1873. Miscellaneous Books, School Books, "GOLD PENS. Toy Books, QUE EN SWA IlE, GLA&SWARfi. Aiming to keep pare with all movements whose object is to make low prices, and to encourage the handling of Goods of superior manufacture, I solicit an examination from the best judges and the closest buyers. H. GALLEY. J3T .A3XTK. DEEDS, MORTGAGES &c. AT THIS OFFICE. THE PEOPLE'S STORE W. F. JOHNSTON & CO., Have now open And on exhibition, the Largest Stock of General Merchandise in Tama County, consisting of Domestic and Fine Dress Goods, Ready Made Clothing, Boots and Shoes, Glass and Queens Ware, itats and Caps, Groceries, Hardware^tnd Agrioel tural Itnplemetils, Umbrellas, Parasols ami ZLTOTIOlsrS OIF1 all kzhstids. Shawls, Marseilles Quilts, Wall Paper, «fco., Ac., which they are prepared to sell at LOWEST pnees lor CASil. Aiming to lead in all movements, having for their object SMALL PROFITS and Quick Returns, aud to luruish to the people ot Tama County Goods ot the Best Quality and Manufacture at greatly reduced marginal profits, they would solicit an ®f tbetr atoekj coa lident that they can giva SHAWLS. TOBACCO, i '*--'£&•* v.•" ENTIRE] SATISFACTION 24tf Both to QUALITY and PRICE. k W. F. JOHNSTON AND CO. 41IC £liri(jiiclc. Is published every Thursday liemfng by M. B. C. Taua. If paid strictly in advance Ibe slfbMription pries of the CiinomcLE will pe $1.7" a year otherwise U will be S'JiOO, and no subscription will be allowed run over two years unpaid. Office on High Street, East of' ty i UK. sua Coun- Cash Bates of A&ver 1 Inch, 1 week. $ .80 1 Inci, I month A....... 2.00 1 Inch, 0 months L.'.... 4.00 1 Inch, 1 year .J,, 6. to $ Colunin. 1 yr -ar tf'i 12.80 ji Col'inin, 1 yoar...«. 2'J.iO Cohtiun, 1 year...M ~8.8o Column, I year...... 41.40 1 Column, 1 year. 80.00 L»gal aJtertiSHijr, «t Ippa! r:itps. For tlu) use of large cuts and woed type an additional tliar^c. varying from 10 to 20 percent., will be made. Prompt settlements will be expected with all time-advertisers, at the clo«e of encli calender quarter. Transient advertise ments must be paid for in advance. The Nemesis of Luxiffy* 0 £eaf and blind iu ships of ease, Launched gftyly a'er wresk-thickened Mas. Disporting in an irised froth O'er waves th*t moan of Wrong. What curse will ren i your fatil sloth, Aud break your idle song 0 hear, beneath tho ebb and fiow, The long-eompHlning surge of woo! ir.V/ are w« sunk in deeps of care, While vou ride free and safely there What are our lives but. waves, to feel While they supperi your grooving koel 0 see the wrecks of hope and home, The mule yet questioning despair Of eouutless glaisy eyes, that staro From ghastly faccs in the foam 0 reckless voyagers, bewaro Thy festal ships are frail. And voices of unheeded prayer Lurk thick in every sail. The shroudless shadow.') of the tide, Sad phantoms of the long-denied, Surrounded tliec, gaunt and pale, And Nemesis loans down the air To drive' the coming gats. Too long, too lightly, outh* breast Of boundless ugonjea Yc eat and driuk and sink to rest In languid ecstasies. Whv doss it yawn beneath theo SO Too late thy startled cries, "Woe to ibe negligent of woo I" The gcarded sea replies, It whelm* thee by a simple creed, Of worth in faultless eyes "In disregard of any need The guilt of" safety lies.'1 —[ibtr/inr's Migninc. £c.,fte# Under Ground Transporta tion in Washington—a very interesting Gov ernment ExperK mont. pumps ati'.l liloweis, ono at naclt enl. Parcels to be transmit!el from tni' iiuiklinyto tlio other will bo placet! n tot! Kplieri1. Hut stgtiul given to the. tn»n at tlio other end,by means ot il^ tel-gruph wirn, to start the engine there, which cxhnusts the air from thai end, and th« at mospheric pres Ptttc upon tho ball soon utarts it to wards ita destination. The «xhiWi*lmg is kept tip, ami the natural pressure behind tho ball carries it along at a rapid rate, not nioru than two an a halt or three minutes being consum ed from the capitol to the Printing offioe. To pond it the other way will, howover, requite one or two minutes longer, as there is an ascent ol about turfy five per cent, from the Printing Office to the Capitol. Tho exl austing machinery at the Capitol will neeil to be more power ful tlmn at the other end on account ol this asi.ont aud the great lorco re (piisito to bi ing the pphere up. The inventor claims that the ainmspheno pressure alone will drive the sphere through the tube but it necessary the machinery can also be used to force air in the rear ot tho bail,which will increase its motion. There will be a dozen or more of those spheres some ma le ot wood, suine thin steel, and others ot paper macho. The ina lerial lor the lube has all been pre pared, and is expected here daily. the iioVlli wall ul the foundation ol ing the course of a couple ol months, should hu not be del.tyed in putting ii down ly the wealher. A New Invantion graphy. The Washington SUtr says: Tho pneumatic tube, about which so much has be^n said within the past liver knelt from the other side ot the quarter ot a century, will soon be ocean,thousands ol miles distant and :oiistructed and put to a practical test between the Capitol ami Gov eminent Printing Ofliue. R-derence has heretofore been made in the Star to the roject of Mr. Alb rt Bris bane, and a briet description ot the tube made by him wa-i given. Con 21ess, it will be remt iunered, at the last session approp laied tilteen thousand dollars to construct a tube ot his patent between the Capitol and Government Printing Office,and, as the work ot laying it will soon b* commenced, there will no doubt bo much interest felt in its completion and practical working. Pneumatic lu'ies&ie now successfully working short distances in New York, Lou-j, ilon, Paris and Berlin, bin they are constructed on a diff'crent plan from that ot Mr.- Brisbane, the Vehicle in tlioso lubes being run on wheels, while in that ot Mr. Brisbane it is not, ami consequently much lriution is avoid d. claims that he can transmit packages through a lube from New York to San Francisco by hollow spheres in the tube and exhausting the air from the other end from that in which the sphere is started, thus creating a vacuum, causing tho atnuupluric pressure ot fiiteen pounds to the square inch, to drive the sphere through rapidly. i lotjij bv i j, beqiwaUimi, the honest man went to i is lane W Tho tube is made of pine slaves of three or tour inches wide, one irch thick, put together in circular form, aud securely fastened with heavy iron hoops placed at intervals of tour or five feet. Several coatings ot thick paper are.theu wrapped around it to make it perfectly air-tight aud the tube is placed in the trench se curely packed in clay. Before it is put together, however, the wooden slaves are subjected to a sleain ex haustion of sixty pounds pressure to the square inch, which drives out the sap and congeals the albumen. They arG then boiled iu a preparation ot rosin ami linseod oil to make them perfectly water proof. The inside di inieier will be thirty one inches The entire length of it will be 3,200 feet. The machinery to work it eon sists of two small engines, one in the capilol and the other in the printing office, with a single telegraph wire between the two points Chronicle.

In Tele- When Sir William Thomson in vented his reflecting galvanometer^ and showed its Usefulness for tele graphic, purposes, he insured the suc cess ot undersea cables, whatever their length. Wit Ihis instrument, the iiK)vetn tits ol the little reflector enable the clerk to read oil" the mes sage by careful watching. But ro ceiitlv, Sir William Thomson has in vented an instrument—the patent siphon recorder—which, as its name State N jwS. Muscatine talks of purchasing Babcock fire, engine. The new Council Chamber !«ent indicates, write# or records the mes sage, as received, on a snip of paper, i ®'0 capillary lulling, is not thicker than a 1 J- horse-iair. Indeed, so small is the bore, that the ink will not flow here in ot itself, but squirts out when eU'c trifed. Tins siphon is connected with a coil of coppei wire, ,n ulectro magnet, and an ebonite disk, armed with pieces of solt iron, whicii being attracted by the magnet, is kept ro tating, and regulates tlio current flowing from the battery and llie ca ble. Actcd on by this current, the ink, as already stated, «(ttiris from the siphon, aud writes a succession ot dots and dashes, which represent the.letters of tho alphabet. To an unaccustomed eye, the wiilingisa contused, unmeaning scribble bill a gooil telegraph clerk will read it off as it it were ordinary writing. Thus message will now, so to speak, de- telegraphy has achieved another tri umph.^-f Chambers'1 Journal. The Chicago Tribttn« says "If, according to the Swodenborgian ideas as interpreted by Miss Eliza belli Stuart Phelps, Diogenes is still going about in the mysterious realms ot either, with a lantern iu his hand looking for an honest inan, he in ay as well give up the search. Diog enes' avocation is gone, tor tho hon est man is found. His nanu is Case, and ho lives in North Canton, Conn. He might have gone through the wot !d unheralded and unknown had litnotbiieu tor a brother who died, will by which he bequeath ed to the said honest man $100,000 worth of property, appointing him so!o executor. Instead ot placidly accepting this legace in the «sme brotherly spirit in which it had been ork overhauling the papers ot his deoeased relative, and found a later will, by A'hich tho properly was di vided among various relatives, churches, and charitable enterpi isea. Not content with finding a docu ment that cut him off with a mere Stipend, this honest Case published this discovery and entered tho will in probate. As a matter of course, Case was poor. It would be a pret ty justification of the old proverb that honesty is the best policy" to have shown that Case was amply co warded tor his integrity lv bushels ot greeebacks, which were the acuu inulalion ol a series of honest acts such as he is credited with iu his brother's will. Unfortunately, such is not the fact. There are wicked people who will hold that Case is an escaped lunatic, anJ tint lie can not be relumed to a strait jacket auy too soon." A sharp old gentleman travelling out west got a seat beside his wife in a crowded railway car by requesting the young n who sat by her to please watch that woman while he went ml* another ear, as she had fits. It cost $20,000 to shovel the snow two air out ot .Broadway, N. Y", last week. of Bur­ lington has been 'dedicated.' The Council Bluffs Episcopalians netted #630 by their Christmas lair. Tho Second Presbyterian Church of Cedar Rapids was dedicated Sun day, 29th ult. Harrison county wants three coun ty scats. At least the citizens ot three places are striving tor it. The body ol Dotnuiic Kies cently tound iu was re­ a field near Lamotte. He bad been drinking considerably an 1 it is su}poBud he laid down in the field ami tro/.e to death. The Boone City Council has He cepted the proposition for gas works, and tallo and kerosene are likely to be superseded in M*y. The price 11 to be i|lt a thousand feet. A young man representing him self as light weight champion,' contemplates starling a school in Iowa City, to teauh young Amen.sa the mysteries ot tho manly art.' The Amateur Dramatic Club will when tho work of laying it will commenced. In tact workmen have .i i soon appear tor the nrst time,—no already commonced cutting through 1 mucl to lh the Capilol througli which the tulte Aioiners. 'The Mistletoe Bough,' is to be carried. Mr. Brisbane ex-! and the Unfinished Gentleman' will peels to have it completed and work-1 presented on the first evening. dohght ot Des Two families near Oltumwa got Unto a row on Christmas day, in which knives ?nd hatchets were used, with several uligln. wounds on both sides as a result. Fatal results might have resulted hud not the neighbors I interfered. The entire valuation ef Dubuque county proqerty is |D,!)72.I01. "there are outstanding bo nis to the amount of Tne assessed valuation ol tlie city for .State a,id county pur poses is ",f»-14,9JU, The expenses 'for the year aggregate a slight increase upon last year. I A delinquent subscriber recently the following note to an editor w*10,n I'3 W ls It is an essential condition ot Mich an to say, old boss, that I can't pay. I instrument that it shall be very light am very tight up, which is to say I ami thu siphon, in this case made ot indebted Sorry na K |at-,l 0 u ten cents a barrel wa8 I couldn't buy enough to grease my har. Don't worry about it, I (rsely forgive you the debt." A California Gormand. Tl.* Pacific street nrgro EofF, who distingushed himself a short lime since by drinking a gallon and a halt of mixed liquors in the period of half an hour, gave another of his recherche parlor exhibitions Thursday ni«hl. on a wager. Tlie affair came oft" at a grocery shop, on the corner of Jackson and Jefferson Sireets,and the programme advertised the do vouring of a fifteen pound turkey, with stuffing and trimmings, two loaves ot bread, a quart bottle of pickles, and two quarts of whisky prepared ill the form ot hot shng.— Two prominent officers of the police attended to preserve order, and also kindly officiated as jmfges, and dur ing the performance a large numbei ot spectators attended. The feat was an entire success, at the the expira tion of an hour the skeleton turkey being plotted as cleTtu as if a hyena had gone over it, and all the condi ments, including the whisky, having disappeared. The champion was vis ited ihis forenoon by tho reporters, and found curled tip like a gorged anaconda, and sleeping sweetly. Tho parties having this gifted African iu training contimplale a publij exhibi tion shortly, probably for the benefit ot some charitable institution.—Han irancitco Bulletin. The Ideal Farmer. Ralph Waldo E^nerson, in nors ot nature, one of his essays, thus portrays the glory of the tanner "The glory of thu fanner is that, in the divinon of labor, it is his part, to create. All the trades rest at. last in his primitive authority. Ho stands closu to his nature, ho obtains froin the ai th the bread an 1 the meat. Tfiu food which was not ho causes to be. The first tanner was the first man, and all historic nobility rest on possession and use of land Men do not like hard work, but every man has an exceptional respect lor tillage, and the feeling that this is tiie orig nal calling of his race, hat be him self is only excused from it by Boine circumstances which made dele gale tor time to other hands It fie had not some skill which recom mend him, the farmer will give him corn, he must himself return in to his duo place anong the planters. Ant! the profession has in all eyes this ancient charm, as standing near est to God, tho First Cause. Then tlie beauty ot nature, the tranqulity and innocence ot ihe countryman, his independence and, his pleasing arts—th* cares ot bees, ot poultry 1 sheep, ot ows, the dairy thu care ot hay, of fruits, ot orchards and for ests. and the reaction of these on the workman in giving him astength aill plain dignity, like the lace and man all men acknowledge. V Whole No., 314. All in-'ti keep the far in in reserve as an asylum, where, in case of mechan ic to hide the property, or asolilu IfeS it i h«y do not succeed in societ^jL And who knows how many glances ot remorse are turned this way from mortified pleaders in courts and sen ates or from the victims ot idleness and pleasuro i' Poisoned by town life and town vices, the sufferer resolves: Well, my children, whom I have in jured, shall go back to the land, to ne recruited and cured by that which should have been my nursery, and now shall bu their Hospital. l'ro:u tlie Ceurier des Biais Unis. Great Polar Continent. A Valley of Mastoions—Exploring a Mine of Ivory—A Mountain of Ice One Thouianl Feet High- The ship Cadmus has arrived at San Franciseo on its return voyage front the Artie Ocean,whethor it had gone to collect the remnants of the slnpwreeked whaling fleet. Oil e 25th of September the Cadmus re ceived from the captain of the whaler George Robbins certain dispatches addressed to the French Geograph-• i*al Society by our countryman, M. Paw, now on an expedition to thu North Pole. These dispatches are dated the 2")lh ot August, on the eastern coast of Wrangel Land.— We present an analysis ot the inter esting documents which have been brought b) the Cadmus The expedition, composed of M. Octave Pavy, commander, Prole. Thomas Newcomb and Henry Ed wards, of San Francisco, M. Jean Bruil aud four seamen, landed on the 18th of June on the eastern bank of Holyuehin Bay. On the 22d of June the explorers, reinlorced by eleven natives, started in tin direc tion of the east, along the north bank of the Siberia, having provided them selves with sleds and dogs. On tho 17th ot July they reached the mouth ot the river Petrolitz. Near the mouth of this river they encountered imtnese fields ot ice moving in a northeasterly direction. They trav ersed one singje plain of ice sixty miles in extent.. Their bearings in dicated a deviation ol"eighteen miles from their intended course. This was caused by tho movement ot the ice, this fact going to confirm the theory of M. Pavy concerning the concen tration and augmentation ot tho great Japanese current, known as ihe Ku-llaSirod, which flows through Behring Strait on the right, and th-nco toward the east off the coast ol Siberia. Tho explorers reached the shores ot Wrangel Land near the mouth of a gri.al river, running from the northwest, and which is not set down in any chart. This M. Pavy con sidered as confirming another of his theories that there exists a great polar continent, and of which the temperature is sufficiently warm to melt *,he snow. Tho current ot this hitherto unknown stream flows in an easterly direction along tho coast, with a rapidity of six knots an hour. M. avy and his party followed 'he plain of this riyer toward tho north tor about 250 miles. Tho plain is uniformly level, its width varies from fitly lo sixty miles, and it is bordered by mountains ot great height, with many perpendicular peaks. About eighty miles from thd mouth ot tho river the travelers found upon the plains tho remains of mastodons, and ou clearing away tho suow, tusks were visible and they brought to light the enormous body ot one of Iho animals of an extinct raco.in a perfect state of preservation. The skin was covered with black and streaked hair, very long and thick on the back. The tusks measured elev en feet eight inches in length, and were curved up to a level with the monster's eyes. The animal was itt a knefcling posture, tho front legs be ing bent, while the hind parts were deeply imbedded in tho snow, indi cating that the mastodon had perifh etl iu struggling to get out of a mire hole or snow driit. Prof. Newcomb could not find any special characteristics distingaishing the extinct mastodon from the ele* phant of to day. Ho took from the stomach some specimens ot bark and herbs, the nature ot which he cou'd not analyze on the spot. For the space ot many miles the plain was coveted with tho remains of many mastodons, indicating that a numer ous drove ot these gigantic animals had there perished, owing to some sudden change or convulsion of na ture. This region abounds in Polar bears, which devour the remains ot the mastodon. About 120 miles from the coast, and a halt league from the river, rise* an ico mountain about 1,000 bet in height, tho basis ot which is stir rounded by gravel and rocks deeply imbedded iu the soil. Tim smooth ness ot the rocks and their rounded form prove that they were at one time in the bed of the river, from which they have been cast, up by some sirange phenomenon. Artie animals aro numerous in the valley, aud myriads ot artio birds fly about thd river and its banks. At the dale ot these dispatches M. Pavy was prepared to winter under the seventy fifth degree ot latitude^ iu the valley ol the gieat river polair continent. Both ho and his com panions were in good health ami courage, and were confident ot arriv« ing, during the coming season, at a great polar sea of moderate temper* ature, at the extreme north ol the continent, ..v-, v. ..ft ik.-vi»

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