23 Ocak 1873 Tarihli The Toledo chronicle Dergisi Sayfa 1

23 Ocak 1873 Tarihli The Toledo chronicle Dergisi Sayfa 1
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u*. 0B i«rt find NI of rea ls a ?IRST ,,er 1*. ti lt. M. 'se»|*r NATIONAL BANK TAMA CITY. IO\VA. A, HALL, PRE*. G. II. WARSEX, Cashier. A. L. HOUOHTJN, Asst. Cashier. Wo refe to all of o ur Customers, wew York Corresplftdent, Chatham Na- Menal Bank, Cuieago Correspondent, Manufacturers' Kg Rational Dank. t1? .FE HAIMON. D. \.HALL, OLI-WAREM, 1TAMA COUNT! BANK, Pol«do. Iowa. FAlftXSOtf, HALL k WASHEN, BANKERS Correspondents: K«untie Brothers, Now brk, and Third National liank, Chicago. WM. ml*, UlU} H. HARRISON, "4§eneral Insurance Agent, *0L*l0, IOWA. Represents Ihe »CHARTER OAK JIFE Wt.t INSURANCE CO.. or HARTFORD. 0U33 ET3 $10,000,000 h«Y. wrds rd as# AW Ike following reliable Fir* Inanrti*e* Companies: (Cla». of Hart ford, asteto $6,000,000 Mo«e, of New York, assets 6,000.('(JO fariford, of Hartford, assets 2,750,000 Pbeenii. ef Hartford, assets 1,785,000 H'i'itK if ce. Speeial aitontion will hp given to lnsur 1*HLUN08, HARMS ami CONTENTS igaism FIRE ami LIGHTNING, for a peri I of One. Three and Five years, and low is any om ran possibly gift*. I OMCE-\* Tama County Dank. LWJLT a. JACOB TTIMI, jn BF.RGER & YEISER, (Raeeesscrs to T. K. Aimsliong jTktltiaU aaS retail dealers la II. M, M. M. ijHt U DR.UGS, ClDK'tllS, and CHEMICALS. WILS, jTT |I^ PA1HTS, YAUNISIIES AND ceii «rj ravt, 3i tK, dent. n DTK STUIFFS, LAMPS, PUTTT, GLASS, fce. orfumery, riKNIOAI'L, TOILET I'KEJ'ARA- 1 TL T10XI. MIUM. SHOCI.DM-BRACBS, 4o., to IAIT. WJiArw. SNIFF, -111 ,.i wiVl cioiSLns. DO ®.H 1)01 M" BKUiniflef all kiuds and styles, and ,J ««ually kept la a first-alaas 0! 4.1S r. 9tovo. 1 tif riirsieiaaa Proscriptions earof llv 0,11. ,»pom,*,d. •J rOLKDO. IOWA. 1 LANES.—BLANK DEEDS, MOIITQA t, 4.4S QES, QuK Haimt nnd Justice'^ Blank •p at the I the CUKONU-I.E Ollii-e. DO t. I.r.nl lar R«f. runt*, 1 Ji.r.t- Vall».r WMIUNT mr 1.21 viol a superior article otjWool- Yarn and lumo extra heavy Flan sis frin the German Mills, then call "',1k# UNION .STORK. rami I fi etj) 1 I DO at wki S"**- WANT some new plain or figured Iun«M* i»*r*Fknnel, heavy Water l'root, ucy Seotcli I'laida, Merinos or oth serviccahlM Drees Good*, call then 4® NION STORE. kifeng*r iWS JPO UTIT. I'mil fo sotno jioud Jean», h«avy |Kt- tmet, firm Casnimcre, Hruadcloth, tasks Clot!), or lieavvr—you will at the UNION STORK. L.i c. joo r* *r O WAXY UJflON STORE l**i DO 6! 6.4$ 56i «a JO 6.0* I6i 6^0* WANT some fin*.suits of good *2: 6-3J bsuntial Clothing, soma choice 6.22 rocsries, or a line of best Crockery, 4 jii n't bojr them until you have ex 10 3.i« ®ined Koods sad figures at the UN 58i 1.14 )K 81POUK 2*8 56: a.'1* 16 DO nrt kn,,w l*1*t k n r,r W. the celebrated Whitney 19: 8 U o fot* men or boys, or wool lined 7 8.00 oti or new style Alank^ overshoes, ater l'rool Gaiters, Kid, Calf or -in. 7 other shoe, elbow vour way into tlie jjo ii 44 *n(1 above named many others have just 46i 11.13 en iwwly purchased, and arc of 26! 108ft 'ed to the public at the v«ry lowest oo 10.1S iCM a^The UNION STORE, To- 85j 9 5® Jo, Io«ra, by the proprietors, I Wieting Bros. EU" M. CAMERY, (K ^S)1^ DEALER IK this list, Vasbioery of all kinds. Pumps, 'WiV_?*Por' JobiLBaars's Pl«rw|JSto»a». jl»» i aaa Hard fSWf '1 Sup't) leva BOOKS & STATIONERY, Memorandum Books, Miscellaneotts Books, School Books, Blank Books, docket Books, INITIAL NOTE, Pens, Ink, Pencils, Mucilage, Ink Stands, Pap Weights. Paper Cutters, Ink Erasers,- Pen Racks, Clips, Stationers' Gum, Visiting and Playing Cards, Rulers, Slatest Chalk Crayons, &c., &e. CITY BOOK STORE, Toledo, Iowa. NOW ON EXHIBITION A MAMMOTH STOCK For the Fall Trade! OOJ^E^I^USJIISTQ- DOMESTIC DRY GOODS & DRESS GOODS, IN LARGE VARIETY. READY-MADE CLOTJIING" U00T8 AND SHOES, 1IATS AND CAPS, QUEKNSWARE, ,TA£„ri GLASSWARE. HOSIER\ GLOVES WillIE GOODS, LACES, MOTIONS TABLE 6 POCKET CUTLERY, GROCERIES, DEEDS, MORTGAGES &c For Sale AT THIS OFFICE. THE PEOPLE'S STORE d°48!a GOLD PENS. Toy Books. Writing Paper of various descriptions, n a SIIAWLS. TOBACCO, cC-e., &c. Aiming to keep pace with all movements \vh«se object is to make low prices, and to encourage the handling of (roods of superior manufacture, I solicit an examii itiuu i'roin the best jutlgas and the closest buyers. GALLEY. F. JOHNSTON & CO., Havtt now open and on exhibition, the Largest Stock of General Merchandise in Tama County, consisting of Domestic and Fine Dress Goods, Ready Made Clothing, Boots and Shoes, Glass and Queens Ware, Hats and Caps, Groceries, Hardwar«.and Agricul tural Implements, Umbrellas. Parasols and nsroTionsrs OF ALL iKiisras. Shawls, Marseilles Quilts, Wall Paper, &c., fco., which they are prepared to st*II at LOWEST pnues for CASH Aiming to lead in all movements, having for their object SMALL 1'IIOFITS and Quick lieturns, and to lurnish to the people ol Tama County Goods ot the Best Quality and Manufacture at greatly reduced marginal profits, they would solicit an examination of their stock, coa fldent that they can give BNTIRB SATISFACTION 24tf. Both as to QUALITY and PRICE. W. F. JOHNSTON AND CO. (Vol. VII, No. 4. TOLEDO, TAMA COUNTY, IOWA, THURSDAY, JAN. 23, 1873. Whole No., 316. |lie ^olcila ^lirtfnulc. Is published every Thursday flkorning by WARREN IIARMAS. If paid strictly in advance the subscription price of the CHRONICLE will be $1.75 a year otherwise It will be $2.00, and no subscription will be allowed**# rua over two years unpaid. Office on High Street, East of ty Bank. Tama Coun­ Cash Rates of Advertising. I Inch, 1 week.....,., 1 Inc i, 1 month 1 inch, C, Column. I year Column, 1 year 1 Column, lyear.... .$ .80 .. &no months. v... 1 Ia«h, 1 year..... Column. 1 yoar...i....k Cohinin, 1 year .. 41.40 .. 80.00 Lgal advertising, «t legal rnt.A. For the use of large cuts and wood type an additional charge, varying from 10 to 20 percent., will be made. l'rumpt settlements will lie expected with all time-advertisers, at the close of each Calender quarter. Transient advertise ments must be paid for in advance. The Bells of Shandon. Itr BEV. FltAXl'IS MitlJNT. With deep affection And recollectioa, I often think of Those Shindon Balls, Whose sounds so wild w uld, In days of childhood, Fling round_ my cradU llieir magic spell, On this I pondar Where'er 1 wander. And thus grow fonder, Sweet Cork, of thee, Willi thy bells of ShanJou That sound so grand on The plesant waters Of the river Lee. I've heard bells ehitning •Full many a elirae in, Tolling sublime in Catbedrinl shrine. While at glih rate Brass tongues would vibrate lint all their musio Spoke naught like thine. For memory, dwelling On each proud swelling Of thy belfry, knelling lis bold notes free Made the bells of Shandon Sound far more gtand on The pleasant waters Of the river Leo. I've keard bells tolling O Adrian's Mole in, Their thunder rjlling From the Vatican, And cymbals glorious Swinging ilprearious In the gorgeous turrets Of Notre Dame. But thy sounds were sweeter Than the dome of Peter Flings un the Tiber. Pealing solemnly. 0 the bells of Hhandon That sound so erand on The pleasant waters Of the river Lee There's a bell in Moscow While on tower and kiosko In Saint Sopiiia The Turkman gets. A loui it air Calls men to prayer From the taparing summit Of tall minarets, Such empty phantom 1 freely grant thom But there's an anthem More dear to me 'Tis the bells of Shandon That sound sa grand on The pleasant waters Of the river Lee. Mark Twain Sis Opinion of aa Iowa Secsip*. I got into the ears and took a seat in juxtaposition to a female. Tito fe male? lace was a perfect insurance company lor hor—it insured her against ever getting married to any body exuept a blind man. Her mouth looked like a crack in a dried lemon, and there was no more ex pression than there is in a cup of cold mustard. She appeared as if she had been through one famine and got about two thirds through another She was old enough to be a groat grandmother to Mary that had a lit tle lamb SIIH WM chewing prize pop-corn, and carried in her baud a yellow rose, while a bandbox and cotton umbrella nestled by her side. I couldn't gess whether she was on a mission of charity, or going west to start a saw-mill. I was full ot cm iosity to hear her speak, so 1 said The exigencies of the time re quire great circumspection in a per son who is traveling.'' Says she, what.' Says I, 'The orb of day shines re splendent in the vault above.' She hitched around uneasy like, then she raised her umbrella, and said, I don't want any of your Mass —git out and I got. Than I look seat alone side of a male fullow, who looked like the ghost of Ilamlet ien^thed oatr was a stately oast and he wts rend i"g. Said I, 'Mister, tiid you ever see a camel leopard 1 said camel-leopard because it is a pious animal, and nev er eats any grass without getting down on its knees. He said he had'nt seen a camel-leaped. Then said I, 'Do you chev.'?' He said,'No sir.\ Then I said, 'IL iw sweet is nature?' He took this for a conundrum, at.J said he didn't know. Then ho said ho was deeply interested in the history of a groat man. Alas!" he exclaimed, 'WH are but few.'

I told htm I knew one tho man that made cooking stoves was a great, man. Then he asked, 'would read?' Says I, 'what have yon got lie replied, 'Watts Ilyuins,' Rev eries by Moonlight^atul How to spend the Sabbath.' 4.00 6.40 I'J.Kll '-.'li io I said, 'None of them lor Hannah,' but if he had an unabridged Business Directory ot Now Yor^, City, I would take a little read.' Then he said, Young man look at tho gray hairs.' told him I saw thetn, and when a man got as old as him he ought to dye. Said I, ''You needn't think these hairs are any sign ot wisi'om, its only a sign your system lacks iron, and I advise you to go home aiul swallow a crowbar.' He took this for irony and what little enlcte cordiule there was between us was spilled. It turned out that hi was chaplain of a base ball club. When we uot to Rochester I call ed for a bowl ot boati soup. It ought to bo called lu:td soup. 1 send you the recipe for making it Take a lot of water, wash it well, and broil until it is brown on both sides, then very carefully pour one bean into it and let it simmer. Whontho bean begins to get restlesp, sweeten it with salt then put it in air tight cans, and chuck them overboard and the soup is done." The above receipt originated with a man in Iowa, who got tip suppers on odd occasions tor Odd Fellows.— He has a receipt for oyster soup, leaving»ut the salt. Speaking of Iowa, reminds me of tho way I £ot the money to pay for my ticket and pay lor that fellow's supper. I bet a tellow a dollar that I could tell him how much water to a quart went under the railroad Inidge over the Mississippi at Dtibu que in a year. He bet, and I said two pints to a quart. I won the bet, but alter all that slipper was an aw ful swindle. II tho city didn't fcettle faster than its coffee did, it's old set tler's club would bo a failure, and the eity too. Dubuque is celebrated for its fine turn ouls tin the streets. While I was there a wagon upset and spilled a lot ot women. I didn't sec it—I looked tho other way. No cards. Sanatoria! Glimpses by Grace Greenwood. The 'era of s oo 1 feeling' is likely to prove a dull enough season lor us letter-writers and reporters.— During my late visii to the Senate I found them discussing tho old French spoliation c'aiins. Such vet erans as Mr. Summer and I can re tnembur twenty years of that bore. It everything else tails there is that always to fall back upon. I heard again on this scheme Conkling, Mor tor, Thurmau and others, who were the strong and fircry debaters on San Domingo matters two years ago but they seemed to lack the old force and tire' I think, on the whole I pre'er a meeting of that live bojy of Colorado colonists the Lyceum, at Greeley, to a session of these pip ing limes of peace. Alter my long abscnco, after changes so momentous and struggles so stupendous, 1 looked lor greater apparent changes in the personnel of the honorable Senators and Repre sentatives. Mr. Cameron, the ini mitable, the unconquerable, wears the same look he has worn for the last ten years, and glides about in the same soft-tooted, aboriginal way.— Mr. Summer looks somewhat worn, but has bated not one jot or tittle of his old: lofty, imperious bearing. lie smiles less frequently than lormerly, but with the old pleasant, propitiat ing effect. lie always had a smile of startling brightness, with some thing peculiarly unexpected and irre sistible about it. Mr. Wilson bears on his early,genial countenance a chastened look ofttiumph, and seems one the worse for his mighty cam paign labors. Our cousin of Buok jhain wears the same benigu.uit expression wo.have all known and loved him by so long. Mr. Morrill, of Maine, reminds ouo more than everot a fine old head on a Roman coin. Pleasant Mr. Morrill, of Mer mont, is happily unchanged, and is equally glad to see that his learned collegue wear# alill his look ot chron ic opposition and captiousness dis trust and general dissatisfaction.— Were ho to look happy and confid ing, and -smile around right childly,' like for instance, Senator Nye, we ahould think ho was not long to be spared to us. Mr. Sidiurz, Mr. Fenton and Mr. Trumbull look a little worse tor the wear and tear of a disasterous, rough and tumble campaign, and tho pitiless pelting ot those Nasty caricatures. I looked for Tipton, with his bristling hair and orbit* mouth, but saw him not. Mr. Butler came iuto the Sen ate Chamber one day, and pose .himself near where I once saw him stand on a memorable occasion, when his in-opportune presenoe was taken as a grevious insult ly*Mr. Garrett Davis, and there ensued a singular, silent duel of eyes between tho two politicians, Mr. Butler having the ad vantage. Now, I almost looked to see a venerable ghost enter on the scene, glide like a bloodless Banquo into the vacant chair ot the dead Sen ator, and at last look the rash intru der down with eyes of immortal ire. It gratifies me, I will say en passant that Mr. Conkling lus parted with uone of his dainty jauntmtsfl, or jaunty daintiness, and that Mr. Pom eroy has lost none of his embonpoint. In Male Attire. A Ma"a:hM:otts Sir1, w'-d Couldn't Lire With Hor Stepmother—Shs Travels to Chisago ia Effcoiiva Disguise- Captain Iliokley, of he South Di vision, received a dispatch from po lice headquarters night before last, ordering him to sond an officer forth with to Kiigh»wo:id to meet ail itiooin ingtrain. In compliance with the man date from the Superintendent tho Captain sent one of his men unin structed- except as to the fact that ho would there meet the conductor, who witild direct him. When the oflicr arrived at Kngehvood he wis told, by the conductor that, a gentleman on the train had bewn robbed ot $*»5.— Who the perpetrator was ho had no idea but tho norvons demeanor ot one of tho passengers who wore a Kossuth hat and a brigandish cloak, had excited his suApicions. When tho train arrived iu Chicago, among the passengers who debarked were two parties, one a sensibly-appearing matronly woman of 30 and the per son with Kossuth hat ami a cloak. The latter was tho first to leave the train. With tho assistance of this gallant the lady of 50 stepped to tho platform, and tho two in company walked to the Jault House, whither they were followed by the suspicious conductor. When breakfast was al most over at the Guilt House, yes terday morning, a police officer named Slayton appear, and requested tho parties to hurry by, as they were wanted at the Central Politic Station. The officer took thetn before Super intendent ot Police Washburn.— When the door had been closed very sottly, shutting in the two prisoners and Superintendent, and shutting out the officer, the occasion of the arrest was discovered. Tho Koscuth hat and brigandish cleak did not cover a masculine head or a masculine t'^ure. The disguise was quite perfect, but, on being accusejd ot being ot the 1cm mine gender and ot having donned men's attire, the prisoner admitted her sex and tol1 tier story. She came from Massachusetts to enjoy a trip in no particular direction. \Ylien she started out, a week or so after .Christmas, she had no intention of ending her travels in Chicago more than in any other locality she would return home if she could. She leU there, ahe said, ot her own will, and thought she had a perfect right to do so. See had met with no trouble sinco her departure until now and she could not imagine how she got into her present fix. She would be 17 years old next June. As to the cause ot her leaving i down liast' yague reference was made to the ex istence ot a step imther. As to love, or any other foolisness of that sort, it was perfectly preposterous. She was not susceptible, nor was she pur suing—like a Nemesis, anybody who had wronged her or her family. Her sisters, she was rejoiced to statp, were well married, and her family was eminently respectable. To sparo them mortification she desired her name slnmld not bo known. In her time she had been in lots of places,' among others the lios'on Museum and at Cape May.' She was not afraid of any questions that were gentlemanly. It she 'was disguised in men's clothos, it was nobody's business where she got them. She didn't steal thein, .it all events.' Who the girl is is a mystery, but the ob jectof her trip is evidently nothing else than a love of adventure, main ly duo to too much stepmother.— Superintendent Washhurnjwill tele graph to her tamily when he c%n as certain who they are and where they live. He took the girl home with him last night. Curious Statistics of Mar riage. To people of a statistical, rather than a sentimental turn, the mathe matics ot tnarriago in different coun tries may prove an attractive theme ot meditation. It is found that young men from fifteen to twenty years of ago marry young women averaging two or three years older than themselves, but if they delay marriage until they are twenty or twenty-five years old, their spouses average a year younger than them selves and thenceforward this differ ence steadily increases, till in ex treme old age on tho brhigroom's part, It is apt to ha eroneous. The inclination ot octagenanans to wed misses iu their teen* is an everyday occurrence, but it is amusing to find in the love matcher of boys that the statistics bear out the satires of Thackeray and Balzac. Again, the husbands of young wonun aged twenty and under, average a little above t^renty-fivo years, and the in equality ot age diminishes tbeneefor ward, till for women who have reach ed thirty the respective ages arc I equal after thirty five years, women, like mun, marry those younger than themselves, this disproportion in creasing with ago, till at fitty-fiva it averages nine years. The greatest number of marriages for men take place between tho ages of twenty and twenty-fivo in Eng' land, between twenty five and thirty in France, and between twenty-fivo and thirty-five in Italy and Belgium. Finally, in Hungary the number ot individuals who marry is 7'2 in a thousand each year in England, it is 01 in Denmark, 59 in France, 07 the city of Paris showing 'd the Netherlands, 52 in Belgium, 43 in Norway, 4G. Widowers indulge in second marriages three or four times as often as widows. For ex ample, in England (land of Mrs. Bardell) there are 60 marriages of widowers, against 21 of widows in Belgium, there IS to 10 in France, 40 to 12. Old Mr. Weller's iiaternal advice, to 'beware of the widows,' ought surely to be suppliinetited by a maxim to beware ot widowers.— Lippincotfs Magazine. Women Who Have Been Hanged. ISilrs- SwUshelm's Note-Dook.J The first white person executed in Minnesota was a woman. As an il lustration of her class ot intellect, it WHS told that when she went into tliu Territory she took with her frotn Central Illinois a bucket ot butter, kept it in her state-room on a first-class boat and carried it her hand to a first class hotel (the Mer chants'), keeping it by her side in tho parlor and hor bed room, while leav ing her other baggage to be handled by porters. She had heard that but ter was scarce in that paft ot tho country, and had brought her supply. This and her general appearance and behavior led to tho belief that she was a person ot weak mind. She married a man who treated hor cruel ly* and died with symptoms of pois on. A chemist thought he found arsenic in tho stomach, and a drug gist had sold her soma of the drug 'to poison rats.' There was no at tempt tr dispute the chemical tests. This expedient was discovered lately tor the benefit, of a woman who had outlived tho chains which onca drove rival claimants for her hand to tho verge of suicide and madness Being old, unattractive and, none but tho ladies of St. Paul took any speci al interest in her case and those could only beseiga the Governor for a pardon. His wife led a deputation of them, knelt at his foot, ami with tears and passionate entreaty begged executive clemency but the ugly woman was hanged by tho uock an *,jl sho was lead. A poor German woman was execut ed near Philadelphia about five years ago and her confession in her brok en English, was ons ot tho saddest things I over read. Her man had 'peat' her, so much, made her work in tho field when she was so sick and tirod poat her for not keeping up beat her for stopping to nurse her baby made her work in the house while he rested and smok ed, and peat her if she was not ready to go out to work when he was! She was so tired could never get no rested she wanted to leave him and go away, but he tako tho children from hor: she have lour little children he peat them too she could not leave her children she was so tired sho gave her man stuff she sorry she kill her man but she no know what to do, she so tired. The dailies inado occasional news items out of the case, and tho poor, old, worn out. slave was universally voted a monster of iniquity. Tho majesty of tho law was vindicated by Bonding her from tho gallows to the unerring judgment, where her toil worn hands are tortured and aoul musi have been very white compar ed to tho bejewelad fingers ot the charming monsters wdio slip so grace fully through the elastic meshes of our man-made-laws. Mrs. Sugart now under sentence of death iu Butler County, Pa., who is to be hanged wln-n tho present treatment in the Rixmont Insano Hospital shall have so tar restored her reason as to mako her sensible of the solemnity of tho occasion, is grav-haired and a grandmother, and in personal appearance the opposite of charming. Mrs. Grinder, who was executed at Pittsburg, some eight years ago, had studie tho art of poisoning to the neglect ot that of pleasing. She was not charming, aud such sharojs as she had were reserved for her hut baud. 4 Contempt." In tho Illinois House of Represen tatives this forenoo^ a resolution of fered by Mr. Herrington, tho 'minor ity' member from Kane county, look ing to legalizing the assumed powers ot courts to punish editors for con structive contempt,' was defeated by a vote ot 40 to 86. This indicates Y«ry decidedly that the frionds of a tree press are largely in the majority in that body, aud that when the ques tion of defining the 'contempt' pow ers of oourts comes up a just i»W will be passed. The Eastern Ohio Poultry associa tion which holds its first annual exhi bition at Youngstown, O., has changed the time ot commencsmsnt, from Feb. 3d, a* first advertised, to Feb. 12th. "ii i ^i(i Pistols were in nse in 1541.

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