13 Mart 1873 Tarihli The Toledo chronicle Dergisi Sayfa 1

13 Mart 1873 Tarihli The Toledo chronicle Dergisi Sayfa 1
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Vol. VII, No. 11. FIRST NATIONAL BANE TAMA CITY. IOWA. jj, JL HALL, Pres. 0. H. WARHCH, Cashier. A. L. UOUQHTON, Ant. Cashier. a^ We reft to all of our Customers. TBj New York Correspondent, Chatham Na llenal Bank, Chicago Correspondent, Manufacturer** Katlenal Bank. [l7 '•w a BABKISOM. B.FT.AAIL., S.B.W11IU TAMA COUNTY BANK, —Of— roledo. Iowa1. 14&US0N. BALL WARBSN, BAHIXBS Correspondents: Keuntie Brothers, New Terk, and Third National Bank, Chicago. WW. H. HAfffilSOH, general Insurance Ageat, TOLBDO, IOWA. lepresents the CHARTER OAK LIFE INSURANCE CO.. Or HARTFORD. gySBBTS S10.000.000 Ail ihefellewisg reliable Fire Insurance Companies: Mtn», ef Hartford, assets $0,000,000 Home, of New York, assets 6,000,000 of Hartford, assets 2,750,000 PhMsii, ef Hartford, assets 1,785,000 insur /ONTEN TS sftinai I' mn ana I UPL'L 1 W gptcinl attention will be given to ,F HRRKLLLNGS. HARMS and CON! sttinx F1KK and 1.10 I1TN1NO, for i ,u 111^ 4 ef One, Three and Fire years, LeCrand Christian Institute. LIUHAIIU. IOWA. F. R. )V A 1 E,—l'r\ncif*l. CALAMDSI 1JT2 4. Full Term commeuOM Pep!. 9, 1971 Winter Term w INSURANCE. TUB MKKXCTJCVT MUTUAL life Insurance Company, Oyganieod in 1646 Ki Atsets, J. M. SEARLBS. for a peri and tin at low at any ont can pottibly givt. OFFICE—In Tama Ceunty Bank. 6-8 HtESKRVE THE SHADOW, BUB TUB SUBSTANCE FADE! j. s. MO6RE, ii now prtpared to produoe SHADOW PHOTOGRAPHS isthemeit insproved stylo of modern art. C»U and tznnine tampltt of kit work— SATISFACTION GUARANTEED I GALLKRT OVER BROWN'S GROOERT. TOI.KIK). IOWA. [3-ljr $39,000,000. Btrideade te Pel icy Holders,jM ?rsi frr 1871, 47 per cent. X. C. RICE, i*r established 1-857. i. Dec. t, i$72 flprinf Mar. 24, '73 Fell Sept. S, 187» Tuitien from $1,00 to $0,0 per term, 26 per e#nt. discount to soldiers' and minis* isrs' children. Good board can be had for f'J 5'J to 3,00 per week. Rooms furnished «r nt, for thoie who wish to board them S»!T#S— can be bad on reasonable terme— For further particulars address tho prinei pal. 421/ Agent. BUCKINGHAM, IOWA. STOP AND LOOK IN AT THE lflW BOOT 1SH0ESTORE OF W. J. BURNS, ust established in the build iag south of N. W. Browa't grossry, NEW GOODS, NEW STORE AND NEW PRICES. LADIES and GENTLEMEN will consult their own in terest by examining goods And prices before purch asing. A Specialty made of SEWED WORE. BOOKS & STATIONERY, Miscellaneous Books, Memorandum Books, School Books, Blank Books, Pocket Books, GOLD PENS, Playing Cards, Rulers, Slates, Chalk Crayons, &c., &e. CITY BOOK STORE, Toledo, -i. CEDAIt MARBLE FIRST BUSINESS HOUSE BELOW IRON BRIDGE Bishop Toy Books." Writing Paper various descriptions, INITIAL NOTE, Pens, Ink, Pencils, Mucilage, Ink Stands, Paper Weights, Paper Csttoff, Ink Erasers, Pen Racks, Clip*, Stationers' Gum, Visiting and Iowa. Cedar Rapids, Iowa. W* COS, Agent, Toledo. 8-28 I. P. BALDWIN, Gcn'l AgeB NOW ON EXHIBITION A MAMMOTH STOCK For the Fall Trade! ©OMI^JEXIfillPa-CSr DOMESTIC DRY GOODS & DIIESS GOODS, IN LARGE VARIETY. READY-MADE CLOTHING, BOOTS AND SHOES, HATS AND CAPS, QUEENSWARE, GLASSWARE. HOSIERY & GLOVES, WHITE GOODS, LACES, NOTIONS, 'SHAWLS. TABLE (ft POCKET CUTLERY, GROCERIES, TOBACCO* £c., &e. Aiming to keep pace with all movements whese object is to make low prices, and to encourage the handling of Goods of {superior manufacture, I solicit an examination from the best judges and the closest buyers. H. GALLEY. THE MEDICAL EMPORIUM of Tama County —is the place to find— PURE DRUGS AND MEDICINES, Paints,, Oils, Varnishes, Glass, Putty, Toilet and Fancy Articles, Perfumery and Toilet Soaps, Sekeel Books, and Stationery. In fact, everything usually kept in a first class drug store. Call and examine our stock and prices. We are detemiae4 not to be Undersold by any Drug House in the county. Thankful for past favors, we hope by strict attentioi te business, to merit a liberal share of patronage in the futmre. Toledo, Iowa. SPRINGER DEEDS, MORTGAGES &c. Fox* Sale AT THIS OFFICE. 6 31 J. 0. BAZT1 RAPIDS WORKS! 6:E2j£LR ESS c&3 BAXTE1R, DEALERS IN FOREIGN AND AMERICAN MARBLE, Largest and Best in Man or any Adjoining County. CO. TOLEDO, TAMA,COUNTY, IOWA, THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1873. f^Ite ^fcroitifle. Is published eyery Thursday morning by WARREN HARMAN. If paid itrictly in advance the^subscription pries of the CIIRONICLS will be $1.70 a year otherwise It will be 9?.W, and no subscription will bo allowed to r«B over two years unpaid. Office on High Street, East of Tama Coun ty Bank. Cash Bates of Advertising. 1 Inch, 1 week 1 Inci, 1 month Column, 1 year ,...1^..'.. 2*2.4 Cc'.uiun 1 .i.... C,a.S' i Column, 1 year 41.40 1 Column, 1 year 80.00 I.!gftl adTerlisiug, at legal rates. For the use of large cuts and wood type an additional charge, varying from 10 to UO percent., will be made. Prompt settlements will be expected with all time-advenisers, at the close of etch calender quarter. Transient advertise ments must be iaid for in advance. Soldier*'. Bounties. Thousands of claims lor pay and bounty a annually rejected by th« Sacoud Auditor of ilm Treasury D» pa. tiiitiui of the United Stati-N, ba cauttj an examirutioB of tlia •fliuial racor shows that tha soldiers or ilieir baits applying hava already r« ceivad all that can by paid thain un der existing laws. Tha azainination of these claims requires consi lerabla labor, and consumes time and attair tion that should be devoted to th' adjustment of claims that are really meritorious. Before filing a claim tli patty interested should bo satis fied thai sonmhiuir is due. If ar rears of pay are claimed by a dis charged soldier, the tune for whioh pay ia aaked should be clearly slated. If bounty is claimed, the act undar whioh the claim is made should be giT.u in the application. This will ladlitate the work of the Depart ment, anil nave tho applicant uune cessrii y trouble. Ihe pay proper of a soldier is easily determined. There can be no inistiudtt standing on that point. Erery volunteer knaws the amount il his »onUily pay, aad lie has tailed to receive it for any portion of his »ci rice, heubotild be able to alale tha linso and amount, liut in the payment of bounty there are so many laws, aud sa many com plex 11168110118 arising therefrem, that occasional mistakes in applying lor bo.inty wlien none id due are quite excusable. Wa propose in this article to review the bounty laws, and to give sueli information as may be useful in leading the soldier ar his heirs to a proper understanding of their rights under existing laws. The amount at bounty duo de pends upon the data and term of en listment. On the third of May, '61, the President issued a Proclamation calling tor 40,000 volunteers, to serve three years. On tha ?/th of May, lSOi, the War Department is sued General Order No. 25. By this order, tha Toluntaars eolistiag tor three years were promised $100 bounty at tha expiration of their terns of servica ar whenever honor ably discharged. Eighty thausand man entered the servica under this order. The aot af July 22d. 18G1, made tha payment of the $100 bauu ty depend upon at least twa years' service. This law was held to apply to those already in service, and the $100 bounty promised by General Order No. i 5 was denied to all who had been discharged before serving two years. In Mareh, 1870, the Su preme Court decided, an a test case brought before it, that the law of July 22, 1861, so far as it previded far the payment of bounty alter two years' service, did not apply to Yol unteers who entered the service for three years undar the operation of General Order N o. 25. On the 22d of April, 1872, Con gress passed an act, covering the de cieioii of tba Court, granting $100 to all soldiers who enlirted for three years prior to July 2'J, 1861, nnder General Order 2J&, provided they were mustered prior to August 6, 1861, were honorably discharged, and had not already received tha bounty. Under this aot, the heirs of a soldier are not entitled to tbe boun ty. It mast be paid to tha soldier himself. It ha is dead, Ins heirs baya no olaim. Soldiers discharged to receive pro motion are not entitled to this boun ty. Such discharge is not consider ed a withdrawal from tho service, within tba meaning of the la*.— Soldiers who have received $800 bounty—$100 wbioh was additional bounty, aot July 28th, 1866—have no claim. Strictly speaking, they have a alaim to bounty—April 22nd, 1872—but its amount is caneeilnd by the additional bounty paid. To il lustrate. Many of the soldiers an listing between May 4, 1861, and July 22nd, 1861, weredisehar gad be foro serving two years. They sub ssquently re-entered the service, and received $100 baunty on their eea ond enlistment. They also receivod the additional bounty, act July 28th, 1866, making in all $200 bounty.— They now olaim bounty und aot April 22nd, 1872. If they are entitled to it, they 28th, lti6C, expressly ferbidfc tho payment of additional bounty to those who have reoeived, or are en bitlad to roaeive more than $100 tounty. Therefore it will be useless expensa lor a soldier who bas re ceived bounty on his second enlist ment, and the $100 additional boun ty, to make application for the boun ty act April :42th, 1872. The $100 additional bounty paid would can oel the $100 claimed under tha laut uamed act. Volunteers eaioring tha service between April 12th, 1 861, and De cember 24th, 180ii, $ .80 2.00 4.00 0.40 12.80 22.40 1 Inch, 6 months 1 Inch, I V"- i-, irgjj Column. 1 year instead of were not en titled to receive the additional boun ty already paid, for tbe aet of i«ty lor two and throe years, ara entitled to receive, under act July 22nd, 1861, $100 bounty at the end of their term, or on dis charge, after two yoars' service.— This bouuty is payable to tba sol diwr or hie heirs. The widow, child ren, parents, brothers and sisters, in tho order named, are tha only heirs entitled under the act. Tbe parents or the brothers aud sisters must have bean residents of the Uuited States at tha death of tha soldier to entitle them to the bounty. It a sol dier died unmarried, leaving a father or mother in Europe, aud a brother or sister in the Uuited States, tho father iu Europe would be entitled to the arrears of pay, but the bounty would be paid to the heir or heirs resident of the United Statoa at the death of the soldier. Soldiers enlisting between July 5, 1802, and Dect-auber 24th, 1863, re ceived $25 $75 advanee bounty, leaving due at end of term. Between December 24tb, 1863, and April 1st, 1864, voluutoers recruits tor throe years, ta new organizations, were en titled to receive S'JOO bouuty, pay able iu instalments—first $60 on en listment second, $40 after two u.onths' service third, 40 atter six months fourth, 40 attar twelve months filth, 40 atter twenty-tour months, and the balance at tha close of the terns Uocrmls to old organizations—

those already in tba field—enlisting for three years between Ootober, 24, lbt)3, and April 1st, 1864, were eu titled to reeeive $300 bounty, pay able iu instalments, as above. Veterans were volenteers enlist ing for three years between January 1st, 1303, and April 1st, 1864, who had previously served nine months or over. They wero entitled to $400 bounty, payable ae above, each in stalment, atter the first, to be $50 $40, as givan to the ia- emits. These large bounties were promis ed by orders fretn the War Depart ment. aud legalized by Joint Resolu tions of Congress, December 23d, 1863 January 13th, 1864, and March 3d, 1S64. Soldiers aulistad under these pro visions are entitled te the full bounty it discharged on account of wounds received iu line of duty. It dis­ charged on account of disease, only the instalments accruing at date ei discharge oan be paid. It discharg ed beeause their services were no louger required, or at tho close of the war, tho tall bounty Is due.— This bounty is payable to the heirs named iu the aot of July 22nd, 1861 firet, tba widoir second, children third, lather or mother, it residents of tho Uuited States at tho death o the soldier fourth, brother or sisters same coudition as parente ,in regard to residence. Tho right ot heirship follows in the order givan. Soldiers enlisting tor two and three yoars, between April 1st, 1864, and July 18, 1864, reoeived $100 bounty, same as provided by act July 22nd, 1861. Soldiers enlisting between July 18tb, 1864, and April 30th, 1865, ware governed by the act ot July 4th, 1864, providing for tho payment ot bouuty to men on listing for one, two, aud three years. One year's servioe was to reoeive $100 bounty two years', $200 three years' $300. This bounty was to be paid in instalments one-third oil entering the service one-third at the expiration of halt the term ot en listment, and the remaining third at the end ot the term. There are sev eral peculiarities about this bounty whioh should be remembered. It differs in several esasntial features from others given. The soldier who is mustered out with his ragiment because ot the olose of tha war, or because his services are no longer re quired, can only meeive the instal ments which aocruod up to the time ot his discharge. If he waa discharg ad for wounds he would be entitled to the full bounty it ho died iu the service his heirs would be entitled to full bounty. It also differs in poiut ot heirship. It can be paid te the widow or children, and to the mother if a widow at date of sol dier's death. The widowod mother, under this aot, is not required to be a resident ot tho United States Fathers are not ontitlod to this boun ty, cor brothers and sisters. Ao cruod instalments are regarded as ar rears of pay, having been earned by tha soldier according to tho terms ot the law. Such instalments oan be paid to the father if tho soldier died unmarried, or to brothers and sisters if the parents are doad. Under nets of MarohS, 1863 Maroh3,1865j and joint resolution April 12, 1866, sol diers discharged on acoount of wounds or injuries receivod in the line ot duty, aro entitled to receive the bounty they would have received if they ha'd sarvad tho full term of enlistment. Disease, or disability re suiting from disease, aro not oonsid- ered injuries withio the meaning of the law. Dratted men and their substitutes anteriug the service tor the three years, between March 3d, 1868 and September 5tb 1864, are entitled to $100 bounty. After September 6th, 1864, dratted men are not entitled to bounty. Neither drafted men nor substitutes are entitled to addi tional bounty. Additional bounty, act July 2$th, 1866. is payable to the soldier, to his widow, minor children, (minors at the passage of the aet), or parents, and only on condition that th? sol diers, or if he be dead, hisu1ieira, have received, or are entitled to re ceive, no greater bounty than $100 under other laws. It the widow of the soldier remarried prior to July 28, 1866, she is not eutitled. i The aot provides for the payment of $100 to men enlisting for three years who have received, or are en titled to receive, no greater bounty than $100. Two years' serviee un der above conditions entitles the sol dier to $50 additional bounty. It a soldier ia discharged on account of disease, and dies from its effects be foro July 28th, 1866, his heirs, as named above, are entitled to the ad ditional bounty. A soldier serving two years, and discharged to accept! promotion, irnot entitled under this! act. The time tor filing claims under' this law expired, by limitation, Janu ary 31st, 1873. Unless Congress should again extend the time, claims filed rubsequent to that date oannot be entertained by the department.— These facts, which have been careful ly collated, may serve to guide the soldier or his heirs to an understand ing of how far the yarions bounty laws affect them, and may save thous ands throughout the land the trouble and expenses of filing claims that can net be allowed under existing laws. —Republican. President's Inaugural- Fellow Citi%ens—Under Providonce I have been called a second time to act as Executive over this great na tion. It has been my endeavor in the past to maintain all the laws, and so tar as lay in my power to aot for the best interest of the whole people My best effort* will be given in the same direction in the future, aided, I trust, by four years' experience iu the offi ee. When my first term of office ot Chief Executive begau, the country had not recovered from the effects of a great internal revolution, and three of the former States of the Union had not been restored to their for mcr relation. For the four past years, I have endeavored, so tar as I could control events, to restore har mony, the public credit, sommeroe, and all tbe arts of p'baee and pro gross. It is my firm conviction that the civilized world is tending towards Republicanism, or government by the people through their chosen re presentatives: that our great Repub lic is destined to be the guiding star to all others. Under bur Republic we support an army less than that of any European power of anystauding and a navy less that that of at least fiva of them. There oould be no ex tension ot territory on this eonti ncnt which would call tor an increase of this force but rather might such extension enable us to diminish it.— Tho theory ot general government changes with progress. Now that the telegraph is made available for communicating thought, together with rapid transit by steam, all parts ot tho continent are made contigu ous tor all the purposes of govern ment, and communications between the extreme limits of the country made easier than it waa throughout the old thirteen States at the begin ning of our national existence. The effect ot the late civil atrife has been to free the slave and make him a citizen. But there is yet a dis position manifested in some quarters te deny to him in part the civil rights which citizenship should carry with it. This wrong should be corrected and to tbe correction I stand com mitted, so far as executive influence can avail. Social equality ia not a subject to be legislated upon, nor shall I ask that anything be done to advance the social atatus of the eol ored man except to give him a fair chance to deveiepe what is good in him, give him access to schools, and when he travels let him feel assured that his condnct will regulate the treatment and fare he will reoeive. The Slates lately at war with the General Government are now, happi ly, rehabiliated, and no executive control is exercised in any other State under similar circumstanoes.— In the first year the past admin istiatien the proposition came up for the admission of San Domingo as a territory of the Union. It waa not a question of my proposing, but waa a proposition trom tbe people of San Domingo, and which I enter tained. I believe now, aa I did then, that it was for the beat intereat of this country, ot the people of San Domingo, and of all ooncerncd, that proposition should be received favor ably. It was. however, regarded un favorably, and therefore the subject was aever brought up again by tne. And, in future, while I hold my pre sent office, the subjcot ot tbe acqui sition ot territory malt have the sup port of the people before I reoom mend any proposition looking to such aoquisition. here sod now, however, that Whole No., 323 I do not ebare in the apprehension felt by many as to the danger ot the government becoming weakened and destroyed by reasou ot the ex exteusion of territory. Commeroe, education and rapid transit ot thought and matter by telegraph and steam, have cbangod the tears to a belief that our Great Maker ahall bring tbe world, in hia own good time, to be one nation, speaking one language, and when armies and na vies will be no longer required. Mj effbrls in the future will be directed to restoring good feeling be tween the different sections ot our country to reducing our currency tea fixed value as compared with the world's standard—gold—and if possible, to par with it to the con struction ol cheap routes ot transit throughout the land, to tbe and that the products of all aeotions maj find a market, and leave a living renumer atiou to the producer to the main tenance ot friendly relations with all our neighbors and with distant na tions to the establishment ot our commerce, and a share in the carry ing trade upon the ocean to the en couragement of such manufacture ing industries as can be economically pursued in this country, to the end that the exports of home products ami industries may pay tor our im ports—tie only sure method of re turning to and peimaneutly main taining a specie basis to the eleva tion of labor and by a humane course te bring the aborigines of the country under the benigu influence ot education and civilization. It is either this or a war of exter mination. And a war ot extermina tion, carried on by a people engaged in commerce and all industrial pur suits, must be expensive oven when waged against the weakest people and must be, furthermore, demoralia ing and wickcd. Our superiority ot strength aud advantages of civiliza tion should make us lenient toward the Indian. The wrong already in flicted upon him should be taken into acoount, and the balance placed to his credit. The morals ot the question should bo considered, and the question asked, Can not the In dian be made a useful and produo tivc member of society by proper teaching and treatment When the effort is made in good faith we will stand better before the civilized na tions ot the earth and the bar ot our own consciences tor having made it. These things :ire not all to be ac complished by one individual. But they will receive my support, and such recommendations to Congress as will in ray judgment best serve to carry them into effect. I beg your support and encouragement. It has been, and is my earnest de sire, to oorrect the abuses that hare grown up in the civil service of the country. To secure this retermatiou rules, regulations and methods of ap pointment and promotion, were es tablished, and have been enforced.— My efforts for such reformation shall be continued to the best of my judg ment. The spirit ot the rules adop ed will be maintained. I acknowledge before this assemb lage, representing as it does every section ot our oountry, the obliga tion I am under to ay countrymen for the great honor they have con ferred upon me by returning me to the highest office in the land, and tbe further obligation resting on me to render them tho best services with in my power- Thia I promise, look ing forward with the greatest anxie ty to the day when I shall be. releaa ed from the responsibiliticc that at time* are almost overwhelming, and' trom which I have scarcely bad a re* spite since the eventtul firing upon Fort Sumter in April 1861, to the present day. My aervices were then tendered and aoceptcd under the first call for troopa'growing out of that event. I did not ask for place or position, but was entirely without influence or the acquaintance ot persons of influence. But I was resolved to perforn my part in the struggle threatening the very ex is* tence of the nation. I performed a conscious duty without revengefel feeling toward any section, or indi vidual. Notwithstanding this, throughout the.war, and from my candidacy for my present office ia 1868 to the eloae ef the last presi dential campaign, I hare been the subject,et abuse and slander scarce ly ercr equalled in political history. But to-day I feci that I can afford to disregard it in riew ef your verdict, whioh I gratefully accept aa my vin dication. U. S. GBANT. In these days of diroroe the exteat of a father'c liability in providing foe the children, was decided the other day, in San Franoisco, to the extent of about $1,700. In 1871, a woman sued for a divorce and got it, as well alsoaa the custody ot her children.— She now brings suit for the amouat named, aa expended sinoe tbe diroroe in maintaining the ohildren. The be* lendent eontcats the auit, on the ground that he was released from all liability tor the support ot the chil dren by the decree of the Ceert, awarding them to the ouatody of tbe mother. But his demurrer was over ruled by the Judge, who took the wo man's view ot the law. and the prob ability is the case will also be deoldtd in tbe aame manner. Tbe first ooiniage of the United Ststcs waa made in tbe year 1737, and Connecticut can claim the dis tinatlo#, •r* -i

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