12 Mayıs 1936 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1

12 Mayıs 1936 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1
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WEATHER. _ . . (U 8 Weather Bureau Forecast.) The Only evening paper JratSrSiSSJrSK ■ • in Washington wilt, the variable winds: Temperatures—Highest, Associated PreSS NeWS and Wirephoto Services. Cloting New York Markets, Pafe 18 ^e*t*r^*3r’f Circulation, 138,707 No. 33,614. ^"offlcY 'waahington, "d A\7 ASHING TON, D. C., TUESDAY, MAY 12, 1936—FORTY PAGES. *** w Mean* Associated Pre.s. TAAtO CENTS. - ~ ■■ - 1 ■■ ■ .—. "--" ■ " ~~ . ■ ■ ■ ■ - - 11 --—....- ■■■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ROME THREATENS END OF LONDON RELATIONS; ALOISI LEAVES GENEVA —- • _, • ____ A ■■■■■ II Duce Insists Sanctions Be Lifted. GRANDI TOLD TO BARE AIMS Recall to Follow in Case of Rebuff, Is Warning. BACKGROUND— Since Mussolini proclaimed an nexation of Ethiopia he has in sisted. at Geneva that the Italo Ethiopian question is settled. Thus, he maintained, there is no reason for continuation of economic sanc tions against Italy by the League of Nations. A hardening attitude among League delegates, however, i* bached chiefly by Great Britain. tCopyrlght. l«3ts. by the Associated Press.) ROME, May 12.—Suggestions .that the League of Nations will be disrupted and that Great Britain and Italy may break diplomatically were made - by Italian sources today. Senator Roberto Forges Davanzati Stated, following the Italian delega tion’s withdrawal from Geneva, that the League would be shattered through the action of other League members. Reliable sources said that if British diplomats continued to “flourish the whip of sanctions" a diplomatic break would be inevitable. Little Hope Seen in Eden. Forges Davanzati, In an editorial in La Tribuna, wrote: "Since Italo Ethiopian affairs continue to be man aged by Mr. Eden (the Birtish foreign secretary) who, as a good conserva tive, is awaiting the collaboration of the future cabinet of the French Pop ular-Masonic-Communist front, one can be certain Mr. Eden will carry out the policy he has carried on for about a year with d result all can see. "The League will be shattered through the action with the responsi bility of League members.” Dlno Grandi, Italian Ambassador in London, was instructed to present to the British government the resolu tion creating the new Roman Empire with annexation of Ethiopia. Reliable sources said the Ambassador was in structed also to try to "make Britain like it." The Italian government adopted an attitude of "maximum reserve” toward League Council deliberations over Ethiopia. The controlled press was ordered to follow this policy in all comment. Senate Is Convoked. The Italian Senate was convoked for an extraordinary session Saturday, probably to ratify creation of the new Italian Empire, and Fascist officials said Victor Emmanuel might be crowned Emperor of Ethiopia at the sacred city of Aksum. The “hush, hush” tactics employed in Italy’s diplomatic campaign to maintain its empire already had been used to advantage in the military campaign for East African conquest. Publication of military communiques (See ROME, Page A-6.) PLANE CRASH KILLS THREE IN WISCONSIN Father and Daughter Victims When Relative’s Ship Dives Into Woods. B7 the Associated Press. NEW LISBON, Wis.. May 12.—Three persons died In the crash of an air plane in a heavily wooded tract on the Martin Wood farm three miles from here late yesterday. The dead: Herman Underdahl, about 42, Los Angeles, Calif., the pilot. Carl Ristow. 29, New Lisbon farmer. Caroline Ristow, 8, daughter of Carl. Underdahl, a retired Navy officer, here for a visit with Wood, his cousin, had been taking relatives and neigh boring farmers on sightseeing flights. Acceding to the pleas of his daughter, Ristow went up to give her a ride. Underdahl banked at an altitude of 600 feet and the plane went into a dive. The pilot and Caroline were dead when neighbors reached the scene. Ristow died in a hospital several hours later. Underdahl flew the .chip from Los Angeles. MEDITERRANEAN BASE SCENE OF BRITISH TEST Secret Practice Mobilization of Defense Forces la Held. my tht Associated Press. .MALTA. May 12—Great Britain tested the vunerability of this strate gic Mediterranean naval base between Sicily and Africa today in a secret practice mobilization of its defense forces. Involving navy, army and air units. A feature of the naval operations was believed to be the disembarkation of a landing pgrty of demolition ex perts, in flat boats from submarines. The .test mobilization will continue through tomorrow night. The populace, accustomed to such maneuvers, in this British base less than 100 miles from the Italian Island of Sicily, showed little interest In the exercises. British to Answer Italian Charges of Dumdum Bullets English Expected to Dis■ pose of Issue in Sen sational Manner. ' By the Associated Press. LONDON, May 12—The British government, it was Intimated authori tatively today, intends to make a com plete answer to renewed Italian charges on the supply of dumdum bullets sent to Ethiopian forces. The answer, it was said, will deal with a communication understood to have been given the League of Na tions by Italy today. This communication was under stood to accuse Great Britain and the Ethiopian Legation in London of being jointly connected with supplying dumdums to Ethiopian warriors. An authoritative source intimated that Great Britain would dispose of Italy’s charger not only effectively but somewhat sensationally, saying: “The British government has a very good and complete answer." 40-Hour Trip to Channel Predicted—Hindenburg Re ported 900 Miles on Way. By tfce Associated Press. ABOARD THE ZEPPELIN HIN DENBURG. EN ROUTE TO GER MANY, May 12.—The Hindenburg's high command, encouraged by favor able weather reports, predicted today a 40-hour trip from Lakehurst to the English Channel. Dr. Hugo Eckener, president of the Zeppelin Co., declared as the huge craft headed out over the sea on the return leg of Its maiden North Amer ican voyage: "The last weather reports Indicate we'll make favorable progress all the way across, reaching the channel in 40 hours.” Officers and crew of the Hindenburg were visibly touched at the salute of whistles as the Zeppelin flew low over New York just after midnight. Capt. Ernst Lehmann said he was “overwhelmed” by the hospitality shown at Lakehurst. during the Zep pelin'S two-day stop, and in New York and Washington. Sighted Over Nova Scotia. Bv the Associated Press. HALIFAX, Nova Scotia. May 12.— The giant German Zeppelin Hinden burg, heading into the sun on its re turn flight across the Atlantic, was reported 900 miles out of New York City at 11 a.m. today by Mackay Radio. Early this morning the Zeppelin was sighted along Nova Scotia’s south ern shore. First seen at Barrington, on the southernmost tip of the province, the airship appeared to be following the coast line. It was reported a few minutes later passing over Lockeport. Dr. H. L. Mitchner of Barrington said he saw the Zeppelin at 4:03 a.m., Eastern standard time, proceeding in a northeasterly direction. He believed it would pass over Halifax before heading out across the Atlantic. The physician said the Hindenburg. which left Lakehurst, N. J„ last night for Friedrichshafen, Germany, was flying high and was aided by a 12 mile tail wind. 48 Passengers Aboard. With 48 passengers aboard, the huge Zeppelin, which spanned the Atlantic so swiftly last week, lifted her stubby nose toward stars that studded a cool Spring night, made a hurried courtesy call on New York City and then headed out over the Atlantic. The Hindenburg was starting the return journey of the first of 10 round trips planned for the Summer between (See HINDENBURG, Page A-3.) — NAPS WITH DYNAMITE RIVERA, Fla., May 12 (/P).—County Road Patrolman Virgil strain says taking a nap is a breach of the peace when it is takeq in a truck carrying two tons of dynamite. Strain said he arrested Harold An derson when he found him snoozing In the dynamite-laden truck on a highway near here. Then the officer stood uneasy guard over the vehicle until its owners sent out a relief driver. Delegates Are in Tumult at Action. FIRM POSITION PIQUES ITALY News of Parley in Berlin Exciting to League. (Copyright. 1938. by the Associated Press ! GENEVA, May 12.—Europe’s crisis deepened tonight as the Italian delegation left Geneva by order of Premier Mussolini and the League of Nations Council decided there was no cause to modify sanctions decreed as a result of the war against Ethio pia. Shortly before the council’s action Baron Pompeo Oloisi and the entire Fascist delegation left the city. They carried with them the secret of Pre mier Mussolini's hasty instructions of recall. Even as their train pulled out of the closely-guarded railway station the Italians insisted they could not interpret II Duce's command. Nevertheless, many League observ ers believed the move was a prelude to a complete Italian break with the League. While the train on which the Fas cists rode was still getting under way, the councU met in a brief public ses sion, voted it needed ‘'further time • * * to consider the situation,” and adjourned until June 15. Refuses to Relax Sanctions. Its sole act was to pass a resolu tion reading: “The Council, having met to con sider the dispute between Italy and Ethiopia, recalls the conclusion reached and the decisions taken in this matter by the League since Oc tober 3. 1935, is of the opinion that further time is necessary to permit the members to consider the situ ation created by the grave new steps taken by the Italian government, de ceided to resume its deliberations on the subject June 15, and consider that in the meantime there is no cause for modifying the measures previously adopted in collaboration by the mem bers of the League." Wolde Mariam. Ethiopian delegate, asked the Council to condemn Italy's decision to suppress the sovereignty of Ethiopia. He demanded the appli cations of the punitive provisions of Article XVI of the League covenant, which provides military punishments for an aggressor nation. A secret exchange or views between Italy and Germany took place in Berlin yesterday, a reliable source here declared today. Whether Pre mier Mussolini's decision to withdraw from Geneva was discussed was not immediately stated, but Geneva au- ! thorities wondered if there was any ; connection between the two events. Delegations in Confusion. II Duce's command threw all dele gations into a tumult. Earlier in the day the Associated Press had been told by an Italian spokesman that the situation was be coming most difficult for Italy and that it might be “forced," through considerations of national dignity, to leave the League. Various Council members, sensing this growing danger and anxious to keep Italy within the League fold, had made one concession by midday. They dropped their plan to pass the resolution drafted in a secret midnight session and arranged, in stead, for a presidential declaration to be read by Anthony Eden, British foreign secretary. This declaration recapitulated the various essential League decisions on the Italo-Ethi opian conflict since its beginning. Without directly condemning Italy it made it clear the League stood by its previous decision and that sanc tions will continue. Alois! Disapproves. According to Italian sources, Baron Aloisi, shown the text of the council’s resolution, said it was “quite unac ceptable to Italy." The conferees abandoned the idea of Incorporating into the resolution the doctrine of Henry L. Stimson, former Secretary of State of the United States, refusing recognition to the acquisition of. territories by force. Officials said, however, that this idea was rather implied. Another Mediterranean problem, it was announced, will soon be brought to the forefront of world affairs. It was stated the signatories of the Lausanne treaty will meet June 22 at Montreux, Switzerland, to consider Turkey’s demand for remUitarization of the Dardanelles. Nazis Will Present Eckener With Silver Cup on Arrival the Associated Press. FRANKFORT-ON-MAIN, Germany. May 12.—Dr. Hugo Eckener, back In Germany’s limelight because of Amer ica's stirring greeting to the Hinden burg, will receive a silver cup from Nazi hands when he comes home. E. Sprengler, Nazi party district leader, will present the trophy when the great dirigible comes to Germany’s new Zeppelin harbor here at the end of its inaugural North American trip. Today an official reception was pre pared for Eckener and the Hinden burg, expected early Thursday, and Frankfort got ready to assume its Nazi-designated role as the "world’s sir traffic terminal.” A trained landing crew of 200 Storm Troopers will bring the Zeppelin down. The air harbor, with customs build ings and restaurants, lies 9 miles out side Frankfort. It is equipped with searchlight apparatus and has its own autobus connections. It was announced the Hindenburg’s second trip to America, starting three days after its arrival home, has been completely sold out. There will be 10 such trips in 1936. A hundred thousand Germans, com ing to Frankfort for an agricultural exhibition, are expected to greet the Zeppelin when it turns its nose toward the hangar. All newspapers carried front-page headlines dealing with the return flight. The Hamburg radio station was in touch with the Hindenburg when i it passed over Cape Cod. •m \f \MY SON, IF Theres\ v Nothing ooingThere, it (looks like another four. Wears •FUMEMPiorMenv' J^tsSSm SPONSOR DEFENDS FARM KF BILL Lemke Denies Measure Is Inflationary—Lewis Calls It “Ruinous.” By the Associated Press. Terming the Frazier-Lcmke farm debt refinancing bill "a non-partisan measure, if there ever was one.” Rep resentative Lemke, Republican, of North Dakota told the House today “this is not inflation unless every Fed eral Reserve banknote issued is infla tion.” He headed the chamber into six hours of general debate on the con troverted bill, walking down into the House well amid applause both from his colleagues and farmers crowding the galleries. From a high authority connected with the Federal Land Bank. Lemke said he had information that the big gest part of $5,000,000,000 of farm in debtedness would be liquidated unless the bill were passed and that 15 to 20 million men. women and children would be driven from their homes. Purpose of Bill. The bill would permit refinancing of farm debts over 47 years at 1% per cent interest. To provide the money needed, the bill would authorize sale of tax-exempt Government bonds. If these were not readily salable, up to $3,000,000,000 of Federal Reserve notes would be issued. Lemke claimed there “never has been a bill that has had such public support” and said it should be accept ed on its merits rather than on the basis of what was said about it. He accused the Farm Credit Admin istration of using Federal money for lobbying purposes when it sent to every member of Congress today a statement opposing the bill. Measure Denounced. Passage of the bill would be ruinous to the country and "would be the longest first step in inflation in all the fiat money experiences of history.” Representative David J. Lewis of Maryland, internationally recognized as an economist, told the House. He emphasized that there are $32, 788,000 life insurance policies out standing in the United States, exceed ing $2,000, and 82.944,000 policies averaging $200. These would be practically wiped out by the passage of this legislation, which would be ruinous to the whole country because at least one person in every four of our population is a holder or a bene ficiary in these policies. Lewis said. Majority Leader Bankhead said he "wanted to vote it up or down just like it stands, because that's the way its supporters have made an issue of it.” The Steering Committee, which was behind the successful campaign to bring the bill before the House, was planning, however, to accept some changes.

Lemke said committee members had agreed not to oppose an amendment to eliminate a provision for chattel mortgage loans of up to 65 per cent of the fair market value of live stock. Likewise, he said, the committee has no objection to a projected amend ment to give the President discretion to put “loose gold” back of new cur rency to be issued under the bill, in addition to the backing of farm mortgages. “It would mean nothing,” Lemke said, “but it might improve the public psychology.” ETHIOPIA ANNEXED, HULL TOLD BY ROSSI Ambassador Formally Notifies U. S. of Nation's New Afri can Empire. By the Associated Press. Ambassador Augusto Rossi called on Secretary Hull at the State Depart ment today and formally gave him Italy's notification of the Italian an nexation of Ethiopia. In a conversation lasting approxi mately one-half hour, the Italian envoy officially conveyed to the Secre tary of State that Italy had proclaimed the empire of Haile Selassie Italian territory and that King Victor Em manuel would become emperor of the newly constituted Roman empire. It was understood that the Ambas sador’s call was to convey his notifica tion formally and that the Ambassador neither requested nor received an ex pression of this Government's attitude. U. S. Lacks Public Enemy No. 1 First Time Since Capone Fell 9 Capture of Robinson, However, Does Not Leave F. B, I, Devoid of Work, Declares Director Hoover, BY REX COLLIER. For the first time since the rise ana fall of Alphonse Capone, America today was without a "Public Enemy No. 1." The Government's relentless war on roving outlaws has smashed gang after gang with ruthless certainty—and the title of ill fame has passed rapidly from head to head as the "big shots" of crime went to prison—or the morgue. The capture of Thomas H. Robinson, jr., kidnaper of Mrs. Berry Stoll of Louisville. Ky.. ends press speculation whether that effeminate fugitive “rated" the No. 1 position among the country's bad men. | «oi a gangster ana au-rouna aes-' j perado in the sense that other kid j napers have been. Robinson was a ■■ sorry version of the dreaded type of j "public enemy" pictured by Hollywood and adventure magazines. Yet he was the only important fugitive from Fed eral justice left at large after the recent rapid-fire captures of Alvin Karpis, Harry Campbell and William Mahan—all of whom really deserved the No. 1 title In crime. It is of interest to review the turn >* * ~~ I ■ II — ■ I I ■ over In "public enemy" titles during the past several years. A1 Capone was the first gangster to receive the unenviable ranking of public enemy No. 1. He was awarded the title first by Chicago law enforce ment oflBcials and soon he had gained the national title, too. by default. When Capone found he could not beat^the Federal income tax laws and (See PUBLJC ENEMY, Page A-4X G. 0. P. Delegates, However, May Be Uninstructed and Likely to Shift to Steiwer. BY G. GOULD LINCOLN. Stall Correspondent of The Stsr. INDIANAPOLIS. May 12,-Indiana, if the present plans of the Republican organization are carried out. will send an uninstructed delegation to the Republican National Convention. What the organization leaders will do with the delegation after It gets to the convention is the conundrum. At present, they admit, the majority of the delegation—which has not yet been named—would favor the nom ination of Gov. Alf M. Landon of Kansas. At the same time, it is said there might be a willingness to jump to Senator Steiwer of Oregon if cer tain things happen, if. for example Steiwer should make a rousing key note speech at Cleveland. It happens that the organization is engaged in a bitter fight to retain control. The State committee meets tomorrow night to elect officers. On the outcome hangs a lot. Don D. Irwin, the present Republican State chairman, is opposed for re-election by Ralph Gates of Columbia, and back of Gates Is James Goodrich, former Governor and head of a fac tion in the State. "Jim” Watson Organization. The organization, as it stands today, is pretty much the same old “Jim’’ Watson organization. The Republi cans generally might welcome a change. But they see no particularly good reason for getting rid of a Wat son organization to put in its place an organization which may be dom inated by Goodrich. And there you are. The predictions today are that the present organization will win. The most vulnerable of the present officers seeking re-election is treasurer of the State committee, Burrell E. Wright, who has been accused of playing with the Gov. McNutt (Democrat) admin istration. The charge is that he (See POLITICS. Page A-5.) P. W. A. FUND DRIVE Asks $700,000,000 for Ickes’ Projects in Addition to W. P. A. Sum. BY J. A. O'LEARY. A move to add *700.000,000 to the work relief-deficiency bill for P. W. A. loans and grants for non-Federal proj ects of cities was launched in the Sen ate today by Senator Hayden, Demo crat, ot Arizona. A bloc of House members tried with out success to have this amount ear marked for P. W. A. out of thf $1.425 000,000 already in the dlflciency bill for the Works Progress Administra tion. • Senator Hayden, however, is asking that Public Works Administrator Ickes be given $700,000,000 in addition to what is already in the bill for W. P. A. Administrator Harry Hopkins. Emphasizing that the Federal money spent for non-Federal P. W. A. proj ects creates more employment because it is supplemented by municipal loans, Hayden had read to the Senate a statement in support of his amend ment. His move came on the eve of hearings by an Appropriations Sub committee on the big deficiency bill. Has 2,976 Approved Projects. Ickes’ organization has 2,976 ap proved projects on file lor which no funds are available. Included in that list are three applications from the District of Columbia for loans and grants that could be considered if ad ditional funds are made available to P. W. A. These local projects call for grants amounting to $1,275,000, with loans amounting to $2,975,000 for a new court house and for hospital and prison Improvements. Explaining the difference between W. P. A. and P. W. A., Senator Hay den declared: The difference between the two pro grams is that the Works Progress Administration will do $1,425,000,000 worth of work, all* of which must ultimately be paid for by Federal taxation. With $700,000,000. the Public Works Administration can bring about over $1,500,000,000 of new construction, but the final cost to Federal tax payers will be less than half of $1,500,000,000.’’ He had explained previously that (See RELIEF, Page A-3.) I 1 ■■ .1 Readers9 Guide Page. Amusements_B-20 Answers to Questions_A-10 Comics_B-15 Cross-word Puzzle_B-15 Death Notices ..„A-12 Editorial . A-10 Finance_r_A-17-18-19 Lost and Found._.A-3 News Comment Features .A-11 Radio .B-16 Serial Story___B-12 Service Orders _A-9 Short Story_B-13 Society_B-3-4 Sports .. A-14-15-18 Washington Wayside_A-2 Women’s Features_B-13-14 F. B. I. Director Makes An nouncement as Prisoner Arrives at Louisville. CAPTURED IN GLENDALE ON SODA CLERK’S “TIP” Abductor of Society Matron Makes No Resistance, Although Armed at Time. BACKGROUND— Thomas H. Robinson, jr., eccen tric “Lone Wolf” kidnaper of Mrs. Alice Speed Stoll, Louisville, Ky., society matron, dropped from sight after receiving $50,000 ransom money on October 16, 1934, in In dianapolis, six days after abduction. Young abductor’s wife. Mrs. Frances Robinson, and his father, Thomas H. Robinson, Nashville, Tenn., attorney, were dragged into the case and tried for complicity in the crime. They were subsequently acquitted. By the Associated Press. J. Edgar Hoover said today that Thomas H. Robinson, jr„ arrested in Glendale. Calif., last night, has ad- | mitted kidnaping Mrs. Alice Speed Stoll, LouisviUe, Ky., society leader. The director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation said Robinson told agents that his first plan was to kid- j nap C. C. Stoll, father-in-law of his j victim. Finding that the elder Stoll; was not at home. Hoover said his story continued, he went to the son's house, seeking a second possible male victim. When he could not nnd tne younger Stoll. Hoover said, Robinson quickly decided to abduct young Mrs. Stoll. Mrs. Stoll, wife of Berry Stoll, wealthy oil man. was slugged with a lead pipe before being taken from her home in the *50.000 kidnaping in the Fall of 1934. The Federal law provides a death penalty when a kidnap victim suffers bodily harm. The seizure of Robinson was the climax of an 11-day campaign of swift raids in which Federal agents scooped up Alvin Karpis. Harry Campbell and William Mahan. Hoover Leaves Fight. Soon after the capture, the agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation flashed the word to their chief here. Hoover was attending a prize fight, but he left it instantly and called re porters to his office. “We’ve got Robinson,” he smiled. “Took him in Glendale. Calif. The "blond woman” disguise at tributed to Robinson was reported from many cities at various times in the hunt. A lack of lobes on his ears was the only distinguished physical characteristic of the six-foot youth from Nashville. Tenn. The kidnaping of Mrs. Stoll aroused Nation-wide indignation. She was abed with a cold when a young man gained entrance to the house on Oc tober 10. 1934, to “check the telephone connections.” He forced a maid to tie Mrs. Stoll's hands and when the society matron tried to buy him off with a check he ! slugged her. Bleeding. Mrs. Stoll was ' forced into a car and carried away. Leu nanson notes. The kidnaper left ranson demands written on legal stationery. A later note named Robinson's wife as inter mediary. The ransom finally was paid to her and she took a train for Indianapolis where, according to Jus tice agents’ accounts, Mrs. Stoll had been held captive in an apartment. Some time later, Mrs. Robinson and Mrs. Stoll arrived at Terre Haute, Ind., where they were met by Federal agents. Subsequently Robinson's wife and his father were acquitted of charges in connection with the kidnaping. Director Hoover said that examina tion of the first ransom document in the technical laboratory of the F. B. I. has "definitely established” that the younger Robinson wrote it. F. B. I. records of Robinson's past say that the first charge against him was complicity in a $14,000 jewel rob bery. He was committed to an insane (See ROBINSON, Page A-2.) WALSH TO RELINQUISH LABOR COMMITTEE POST Will Head Naval Body. Tilling Vacancy Left by Death of Senator Trammell. By the Associated Press. Senator Walsh, Democrat, of Massa chusetts, soon wiU relinquish his chair manship of the Senate Labor Com mittee to succeed the late Senator Trammell of Florida as head of the important Naval Committee. Under Trammell's chairmanship he was ranking Democratic member of the Naval Committee. A motion by Senator Robinson, ma jority leader, to give Walsh the chair manship is expected soon. Walsh may retain his labor chair manship until certain work of the committee is completed. By the PPay— • * An Intimate, Chatty Column Revealing the ' Personal Side of Washington Society, Written by Beth Blaine. I Introduced Today on the Society Pages of THE EVENING STAR I ■ I ■ ■ ■ I ■! .— I ^k PRESIDENT LEAVES REVENUE-FINDING TASK TDCONGRESS Major Revisions in Tax Measure Indicated at Capitol. HOUSE BILL INSISTENCE DROPPED AT CONFERENCE Getting Money, Not Way of Doing So, Represented as Important Thing to White House. BACKGROUND— President Roosevelt asked last February that Congress revise whole structure of corporate taxes, with levy on undistributed profits be coming major corporate assessment. House finally passed bill with this provision, but opposition of busi ness interests and doubts of more coMervative members of Senate Finance Committee threaten to block legislation. Senator Byrd, Virginia Democrat, has precipitated new deadlock with charges that certain large corpora tions would pay lighter taxes than before. ay the Associated Press. New tax recommendations were sub mitted to the Senate Finance Com mittee by Secretary Wallace today, coincident with fresh Indications that the House revenue bill would be re vised drastically. Strongly pointing toward much re writing was the word passed on Capi tol Hill that President Roosevelt had informed Chairman Harrison of the Finance Committee yesterday that it was up to Congress to determine the tax methods of raising the revenue he had requested. The important factor, the Chief Ex ecutive was represented as advising Harrison, was not so much the kind of taxes employed as it was that $620, 000.000 be raised in permanent revenue and $500,000,000 through temporary levies. This development gave impetui to the move within the committee to revise the House bill for taxing corporations on the basis of their un distributed income. Hearings Are Reopened. The Finance Committee unexpect edly reopened public hearings to per mit Wallace to recommend: New processing taxes to raise $220,564,000. Enactment of the 80 per cent "windfall” tax on refunded process ing taxes. Amendments to the agricultural ad justment act to Insure retention by the Government of the almost one billion dollars collected in processing taxes. Repeal of those A A. A. provisions invalidated by the Supreme Court and re-enactment of the others. Harrison placed before the com mittee a letter from Jesse H. Jones, chairman of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation, recommending "substantial concessions" in the tax on undistributed profits to corpora tions using earnings or borrowed money for new plant investment. Wants Modernisation Aids. "I have not had time to study the bill carefully,” Jones said, "but if sub stantial concessions could be made that would encourage modernization, new plant construction and new build ings to replace old ones, new equipment for railroads and industry of ail kinds. including allowances for new debts created for these purposes, the em ployment situation, and business gen erally would in all probability be great ly helped, and society much better served. * * •” Jones added that the proposed method of taxing banks "seems entirely fair and highly desirable.” Banka would not be included in the undis tributed profits tax. While Wallace testified. Senator Byrd. Democrat, of Virginia drafted a resolution calling on Secretary Morgenthau for a list of big corpora tions and the amount of reduction in taxes available to them under the House bill provisions. Morgenthau had advised Byrd the Treasury could not “legally” furnish him with the information which he personally had asked for by letter. Byrd's action today was designed to make the request come from the (See TAXES, Page A-3.) FORT YUKON REPORTS FLOOD EMERGENCY Inundated Field Prevents Relief by Air—Influenza Out break Cited. By the Associated Press. FAIRBANKS. Alaska. May 12.—A flood emergency at Fort Yukon, aggra vated by an outbreak of Influenza al ready responsible for six deaths, was reported to the News-Miner today in a radio dispatch. The whole town, 150 miles northeast of here, was flooded by an ice break-up yesterday and the airport also was under water, preventing relief by plane, the newspaper's Fort Yukon correspondent said. Although the water was receding, there was further danger from ice gorges in the Yukon and Porcupine Rivers, the News-Miner learned from its correspondent. Mrs. Emily Randall, wife of a deputy United States marshal. Nobody was drowned as the water rushed through the remote town, Mrs. Randall said, but food, ammunition and household goods were ruined and the Influenza situation was more critical. “The main street between the post office and general store was a rushing torrent. Ice blocks were scattered throughout the town. The condition of the natives is particularly serious. The population is still suffering from influenza.” Names of the victims, including na tives and whites, were not reported. * A

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