12 Kasım 1937 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1

12 Kasım 1937 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1
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WEATHER. <0 S. Weather Bureau Ptarecaat.) *■ Rain with slowly rising temperature to- ^ night and tomorrow; lowest temperature Ms • tonight about 48 degrees. Temperatures M today—Highest, 50, at 2 p.m.; lowest, H 40, at 2 a.m. Pull report on page A-17. Closing New York Markets, Page 16 V*. 85th YEAR. No. 34,163. “'"mS *w£fii2t£,WASHINGTON, D. C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1937—FIFTY-EIGHT PAGES. *** or Means Associated Prses. TWO CENTS ----■ ■ '<• ■ -. ■ 1 - 1 ■' 11 - ~ " — ■ • ... -■ ■■ ■ .-—-‘— TOKIO LEAVES WAY FOR IIS. TO TALK PEACE IN FAR EAST Japanese Source Says Am bassador Grew Can Always Approach Foreign Office. BRUSSELS CONFERENCE PLEA AGAIN REJECTED Refusal Interpreted as Desire for Mediators to Recommend Direct Negotiations With China. BACKGROUND— Signatories of Ninc-Pouer Treaty gathered in Brussels seeking means of ending conflict between Japan and China have been balked by Japan's refusal to mediate. Twice appeals have been rejected, the latest coming yesterday. » In Shanghai Japan dominates the situation. Chinese resistance, which has held the invaders at bay since August 13, has crumbled and her army of 400.000 men has fallen back on the Chinese "Hindenburg line.” By the Associated Press. BRUSSELS', Nov. 12— An au thoritative Japanese source declared today the United States, acting for itself, still had -‘a ticket of entry” to , discuss Far Eastern peace with Japan, despite Tpkio’s refusal of the Brus sels Conference mediation appeal. Tips source said the United States Ambassador to Japan, Joseph C. Grew, could always approach the Japanese foreign office to discuss the Chinese Japanese conflict from the standpoint of heavy American interests involved. Tire statement bore out in a gen eral way the attitude Japan disclosed before opening of the conference here, called under the nine-power pact guaranteeing China's territorial in , tegrity. The Japanese view was that activi ties of Ambassador Grew and Ambas sador Nelson T. Johnson at Nanking, starting from the standpoint of American interests and entirely di vorced from the Brussels Conference or the League of Nations, might de velop ways and means toward peace. New Appeal Unjustified. Basing their replies on press sum maries of Japan’s reply rejecting a second invitation to the Brussels Con ference, the various delegations said * Itiey saw no justification for address ing a new conference appeal to Japan. They interpreted these summaries generally to mean Japan wanted the conference to recommend direct ne gotiations between China and Japan, a plan which Premier Benito Musso lini’s Italian representative here has urged. If the text of the Japanese reply, which has not yet been officially re ceived here, clearly excludes all pos sibility of conciliation within the , framework of the nine-power treaty, conference leaders said they planned to draw up an historical statement of the situation and probably an agenda for the second stage of the conference. After a suitable period of adjourn ment, perhaps a week during which the delegations would receive in > structions from home governments, the conference would consider posi , tive methods of dealing with the conflict. Views expressed in official circles were that this should avoid taking the form of “quarantining” or boycotting Japan, but should extend material help to China, particularly in the form of supplies and financial credits. A proposal by China’s Dr. V. K. Wellington Koo for “moral, diplo matic and economic restraint” of ag gression excited comment today among conferees. Some diplomatic quarters believed Dr. Koo’s suggestion—made in an Armistice Day broadcast to the United States—might have been in * spired, inasmuch as it followed a lengthy talk with the chief delegates of the United States, Britain and France. The Chinese delegation, headed by Dr. Koo, announced only that the Chinese had assured Ambassador at Large Norman H. Davis, Foreign Sec retary Anthony Eden and Foreign Minister Yvon Delbos that China was still willing to discuss peace, even in event of Japanese refusal of the con ference’s latest overture. “Radical” Action Denied. % One prominent statesman par ticipating in the conference said nothing in the way of “radical” action was planned at present by the 19 con ferrlng governments. He emphatically (See BRUSSELS, Page XT) STATE DEPARTMENT IS SILENT ON BRAZIL Borah, However, Criticizes Gov ernment’s Assumption of Dic tatorial Powers. Bj the Associated Press. The Brazilian government's assump tion of dictatorial powers evoked criti cism in Congress yesterday, but State Department officials declined any com * ment. Senator Borah of Idaho, ranking member of the Senate Foreign Rela tions Committee, said the new Bra zilian regime had “every character istic of Fascism.” Representative Rankin, Democrat, of Mississippi in terpreted it as the “collapse of democ racy” there. Senator Borah said he believed his committee would wish to await further ► developments before considering a long-standing State Department pro posal to lease six decommissioned American destroyers to the Brazilian ‘ government. An opponent of the pro posal, Senator Borah explained: , J “I oppose strongly contributing in any way to the success of a system that is at war with every principle on ■which republican government rests.” S *7 Five Americans Escape Bombs As Japanese Destroy Hospital Two Virginia Physicians Among Those Uninjured—Chinese T roops Drop Back to New Defenses. By the Associated Press. NANKING, Nov. 12.—Five Ameri cans, members of the staff of the American Church Mission Hospital at Wusih, 80 miles west of here, escaped death today when Japanese planes bombed the hospital and church build ings. Two Chinese members of the staff were killed and seven were injured. All of the buildings were said to have displayed United States flags. The director of the hospital informed the United States Embassy of the at tack. Despite the partial destitution of the institution the five Americans said they would stay on the job of caring for Chinese wounded who crowded the hospital. The hospital is directed by a vet eran missionary, Dr. Claude Lee of Charlottesville, Va., assisted by Dr. John Roberts of Richmond, Va., the Rev. E. R. Dyer of Dallas, Tex., and the nurses, Laura Lenhart and Ger trude Seltzer of New York City. Chinese Drop Back. SHANGHAI, Nov. 12 (/P).—China’s Shanghai armies, about 400,000 strong, fell back today toward the Chinese “Hindenburg line,” more than 50 miles to the west. Japanese troops, numbering 200,000, forced Chinese from towns and trenches in the Shanghai area. The Chinese fought only rear-guard ac (See-CHINA. Page A-3.) Race Track Owner and Four Others Are Accused by U. S. Grand Jury. J lAUUVVlUtVW A iWUOl PROVIDENCE. R. I., Nov. 12.—A Federal grand jury today returned In dictments against Walter E. O’Hara, managing director of Narragansett race track; the chairman of the State Democratic Committee, the Narra I gansett Racing Association and three other persons charging violation of the I Federal Corrupt Practices Act. The indictments were read by Judge I John C. Mahoney, to whom the jury 1 reported. O'Hara, whose racing plant | has been kept closed by national | guardsmen as a result of his feud with Gov. Robert E. Quinn, was indicted bn four counts, as was the racing asso ciation. William A. Shawcross, Democratic Committee chairman, was indicted on two counts; Michael J. Regan, assistant treasurer of the racing association, on two counts; Thomas A. Kennelly, for mer Democratic State chairman, on one count, and James E. Dooley, for mer vice president of the racing asso ciation, one count. The jury had been considering al leged donations to political organiza tions by the racing association since the body was reconvened recently by United States Attorney J. Howard Mc Grath. Lt. Gov. Raymond E. Jordan lifted the martial law ban on the race track about an hour before the jury reported. The track has been under guard since its fall meeting was scheduled to open October 17. The meet would have ended yesterday. National Guardsmen I were at the plant until noon today, ; when4the period of martial law was declared ended. The jury reported its investigation ! disclosed that the racing association had “expended of its corporate funds ! in a single year to committees and ' persons closely identified with political activities close to $100,000.” | The report said the jury felt such ; contributions “can never be justified in | a State where the receipts of gifts by j the Democratic State Committee dur I mg the same 12 months, according to available but meager records, amount ' ed to little more than half that sum.” The report declared the records of j the Democratic Committee were “woe i fully incomplete” and called “public attention to the need for a thorough going Investigation by proper State authorities into the conduct and ac tions of persons holding public posi tions and accepting funds which have been paid for reasons that are unex plained and not apparent.” •-■ BRADLEY TRAINER DIES Dick Thompson Saddled Four Kentucky Derby Winners. Special Dispatch to The Star BOWIE, Md., November 12.—H. J. (Dick) Thompson, who saddled four Kentucky Derby winners for Owner Edward Riley Bradley, was found dead in bed in the Stagord Hotel, in Balti more, according to word received here today. Fellow horsemen say Thompson ap peared in good health when seen yes terday at the Pimlico track. He failed to arise this morning and hotel at tendants, who went to his room to call him, found him dead. Blast Injury Fatal. NEW BEDFORD, Mass., Nov. 12 UP).—Injuries suffered by Reoger S. Lumbard, 17-year-old New Bedford Textile School student, in an ex plosion during a gunpowder-making experiment at the school Wednesday, resulted in his death today at St. Luke’s Hospital. School officials said the experiment was unauthorized. DEATH TOLL RISES IN LUZON TYPHOON 15 Known Dead and Several Score Injured—Mapy Towns Isolated. DT* t ha A ttni'io f orl Drair MANILA, Nov. 12.—Known deaths from the typhoon which smashed across Luzon Island yesterday reached 15 today, and several score were re ported missing. Among those unreported were 16 fishermen believed to have drowned when their boats capsized in high tidal waves. Manila listed 10 dead, 8 who were electrocuted and 2 who died from in juries and exposure. The other 5 known dead were in Rizai Province. The Red Cross was making a rapid survey, and the damage was found to be not as great as first indicated. Many small fishing craft were wrecked, but a majority of the fish ermen escaped. Heavily Damaged. Public works, including bridges and highways, and communication lines, were heavily damaged, particularly in Bulacan Province where the damage was estimated at $500,000. Manila's damage was placed at $15,000. Many towns remained isolated. The liner President Coolidge sailed today, two days behind schedule. Among the passengers were Harry B. Hawes and Representative Byron B. Harlan of Ohio, members of the joint preparatory Committee on Trade Relations, and Mrs. Hawes. Mrs. Harlan will sail later on the President Grant. Bulacan Province reported terrific winds swept that region six hours, de stroying school buildings, churches and approximately 3,000 homes, leav ing an estimated 30,000 homeless. Houses Blown Down. Prom Subic, in Zambales Province, came word 90 per cent of the native houses were blown down. Giant waves dashed 14 heavy cargo lighters upon the rocks in Manila Bay and periled other shipping. The 20 missing had been aboard 10 fishing boats in the bay. The British freighter Kenilworth was blown aground at Point Pinan dungan, southeast of here, but advices to her local agents said she struck a sandbar and was not damaged. Hei captain advised he expected to re float the ship under her own power. MORE RIGID GUARD FOR KING STUDIED British Authorities Act After Mental Patient Disrupts Armisitce Day Kites. B> the Associated Press. LONDON, Nov. 12.—British authori ties today studied the possibility of adopting more rigid precautions to safeguard King George VI during his public appearances. It was pointed out that the Armistice Day incident at the Whitehall Ceno taph yesterday showed the ease with which an attacker might break through guard lines and approach the King. It appeared certain that 43-year-old Stanley Storey, who shouted “All this is hypocrisy" yesterday during the two minutes of silence for the war dead, had not planned an attack on the King, bat he had struggled through the guards almost to where the mon arch stood. Officials said Storey was suffering from delusions and would „ not be prosecuted. Newspapers praised the courage of the King, who stood motionless during the disturbance. One, the Laborite Herald, said: “The service should never be held again. The silence has lost its meaning.” Christmas Savings Funds Here to Total Over $7,000.000 Eighteen Washington banks which have maintained Christmas Savings Clubs during the past year, will dis tribute an aggregate sum of $7,345, 050 at the end of this month for im mediate use during the holiday sea son, it was announced today by the District Bankers Association. This is a gain of $1,084,310 over the total amount subscribed in 1936 and may mean that Santa Claus’ pack this year will be bigger than ever when ne makes his annual visit to the Capital. The total sum of more than $7,000, 000 will be passed out to 82,858 mem bers who joined the 1937 Christmas Clubs here, against a total member ship of 76,309 in the 1936 elube. The coming cash distribution may drop slightly under the amount stated, as some club members are apt to fall by the wayside in their final payments for the year. Per capita subscriptions made this year averaged $89 per member, which was an increase of $7 over the average subscription in 1936. The amount pledged per capita is said by bankers to be about double the sums sub scribed by members of similar clubs in other parts of the United States. By far the larger portion of these thrift savings will be used directly for Yuletide purchases, bankers said today, although year-end biljs, inter est payments, insurance premiums and a host of other pressing needs will not be neglected. / PROGRAM TOM _ Asks Participation of Pri vate Capital and Lower Interest Rates. HIGH MATERIALS COSTS ALSO HELD DRAWBACK Cites Labor Pay Scales and In adequate Transportation as Among Other Problems. Participation of private capital and establishment of lower interest and building costs were cited today by President Roosevelt as the prime requi sites of a successful revival of wide spread construction. Emphasizing that the entire housing situation is still in the study stage, the President listed five major obstacles as factors in the construction lag of re cent years. Those named were: 1. High real estate costs, whicn he said were tied in directly with the tran^ortation problem since home building and low-cost acre age invariably meant building in areas removed from building limits. The corollary requisite, he said, is for the establishment of adequate transportation facilities. 2. High cost of materials. 3. High cost of labor in some sections. 4. The fact that private industry has done little to organize itself for large-scale building. It is ob vious, the President pointed out, that the per unit building costs for five homes is greater than it would be for 500. but that neither con tractors nor financial interests have established any effective program to facilitate the large-scale building. 5. Very high cost of money, which, he said, ran to 8 per cent in the North and 12 per cent in the South. Workers Income Problem. Mr. Roosevelt admitted that one of the most important problems being studied in connection with stimulat ing building is that of establishing an annual income for construction work ers to replace the relatively high hour ly wage rates now prevailing in many sections. As part of the entire problem, he said, building possibilities of all classi fications are being studied, among them individual dwellings in cities and small towns and department houses. Slum clearance, he added, Is merely one phase of the problem, and It is hoped it will proceed success fully in itself. Mr. Roosevelt said he did not know whether the construction question will be taken up with utility executives in a conference which they have arranged for next week. The Federal Housing Administra tion held out the prospect of larger earnings meanwhile to induce private capital to build new homes. The F. H. A. increased from 6 to 8 per cent the maximum dividends per mitted corporations which get Federal insurance on mortgages financing large-scale projects. Stewart McDonald. F. H. A. admin istrator, said he believed, this and other changes now decided on would result in “millions of dollars worth of new construction.’’ Lower Wages Opposed. Reduction of labor costs in the building field, another subject of study by Mr. Roosevelt’s new Housing Com mittee, was received coolly, however, by William Green, president of the American Federation of Labor. He said he doubted the workability of a proposal that building workers accept lower hourly rates in exchange for a prospect of steadier employment. Senator Wagner, Democrat, of New York, and others studied proposals meanwhile for creation of a national mortgage bank to facilitate the move ment of private capital into communi ties where it is needed. Consideration also was given to sug gestions for reducing from 20 to 10 per

cent the minimum down-payment on an individual home before its mort gage will be insured by the F. H. A. The new 8 per cent profit rule will apply to projects involving a large number of family apartments or homes renting for a price fixed as low as feasible under earnings requirements. Thirty such projects already have been insured for about $30,000,000. _TRYING TO MAKE THE ~BABY LAUGH! STRIKE TIES UP _ 1,300 Grocery Firm Em ployes Walk Out—Most Units Finally Opened. Thirteen hundred of the Sanitary Grocery Co.'s 1,445 clerks, butchers and meat cutters went on strike this morning. Most of the firm's 302 stores in Washington and the surrounding area failed to open at the accustomed time, but the majority were operating before noon, even if the stafl con sisted only of the manager. The strike was voted early today in protest at what the unonized employes thought was the company’s disinclina tion to pursue negotiations leading to adoption of a collective bargaining contract. The staffs of a few stores remained intact, the company reported, and su pervisors spent a busy morning trying to open stores with a handful of men. Walkout in Richmond. The Sanitary Co. experienced a walkout in Richmond, Va„ this morn ing also. Between 100 and 200 of the firm's 350 workers in that city refused to report to work this morning. Dis satisfaction with the course of contract negotiations caused the Richmond strike. There are 73 Stanitary stores in the Richmond division of the company, 53 in Richmond proper. Except for a minor dispute at the company's warehouse, where organized warehouse men sympathetic to the strike attempted to prevent delivery of supplies, police here reported no dis turbances. However, three residents in neigh borhoods of Sanitary stores called po lice when they became alarmed at the sight of the strikers walking be fore the stores. Police were summoned to a store at 5037 Connecticut avenue to investi gate a report that pickets were stop ping customers entering the place, and D. B. Malone, manager, asid he had complaints from “at least three cus tomers.” Mass Meeting Held. The League of Women Shoppers re ported today that a committee headed by Mrs. Mordecai Ezekiel, whose hus band is economic adviser to Secretary Wallace, is investigating to determine whether to support the strike. The committee expected to confer with representatives of both the Retail Clerk’s Union and the grocery com pany this afternoon. The strike followed a mass meeting in Carpenters’ Hall,, Tenth and K streets, where the workers were ad dressed by a number of international organizers and were promised the “co operation” of warehousemen, team sters (truck drivers), drivers of milk delivery trucks selling to Sanitary, bread salesmen dealing with Sanitary and bakers. “Co-operation” was understood to (See SANITARYi~Page A-3J Bootblack Tip Cut as Garner Awaits Change Vice President Re• minds Boy He Gave Him a Quarter. Ey the Associated Press ST. LOUIS, Nov. 12.—Vice President John N. Garner made a bee line for a barber shop when he arrived today : from San Antonio. Tex., en route to i Washington, and emphatically declined to discuss politics. Waving away questioners who sought his comment on whether Congress would repeal or amend the undistrib uted profits tax or would co-operate in balancing the budget, the ruddy faced Texan remarked that he felt fit for the special sesaion starting next Monday. “Mighty glad to see you, but I have nothing to say,” he said. "The old mill is out of order. It used to produce some grist, but It can’t any more.” As he left the barber shop he handed the colored shine boy a quarter. “Thank you, suh,” smiled the boy. ••That's a quarter,” reminded Gar ner. “Yes, suh; I know it’s a quarter,” replied the boy. ‘‘Well, I want some change,” Gar ner demanded. He got back 15 cents. - ■ 9 ' CHEST CAMPAIGN TOPS 25 PCT. MARK 35,946 Contributions Total ing $519,061 Received, Luncheon Told. Communitly Chest volunteer work ers today passed the quarter post in their race to raise the largest quota in the history of local charity be fore the end of the campaign on No vember 23. At a noisy and colorful luncheon re port meeting in the Willard Hotel today leaders of five campaign units reported contributions from 26,212 givers in Washington and its suburbs totaling $280,112.57. This brought the total for .the campaign to 35,946 con tributions totaling $519,061.18, or 25.21 per cent of the campaign quota of $2,059,000. The Special Assignments Unit, which took a large lead at the opening re port meeting Wednesday, was nosed out at the close of the second re port meeting today by the Metropoli tan Unit, which reported 28.05 per cent of its quota in hand. The Special Assignmejits Unit has raised 27.95 per cent of its quota. The Governmental Unit, to which has been assigned the largest quota given any of the •cam paign, groups, was third, with 25.82 per cent. Publishers of the five Washington newspapers occupied the head table at today’s meeting. Others at this table (See CHEST, Page A-5.) — 0-3 Praises Morgenthau Talk, Pledges G. 0. P. Aid in Economy Program. By G. GOULD LINCOLN. Rigid economy in the matter of ap propriations was demanded by Sena tor McNary of Oregon, minority leader in the Senate, on his return to Wash ington today. "I think that the speech delivered by Secretary Morgenthau in New York on Wednesday should be helpful,” said Senator McNary. In that speech the Secretary recommended a curtailment of Federal expenditures, a balanced budget and amendments to the tax laws. "The declaration by Secretary Mor genthau in support of a balanced budget." Senator McNary continued, "should be followed by rigid economy in Congress. I csn pledge Republican support in the Senate for a program of economy. »vo*viativu VI VU1II1UCUIC. “When all groups engaged in busi ness and farming are satisfied there is to be no rash and impractical leg islation confidence will be restored, faith in the administration will make gains and business will go forward." The Oregon Senator is making plans for the opening of the special session of Congress on Monday. He will confer with his Republican colleagues and also with the leaders of the Dem ocratic majority. Turning to a Republican party is sue, Senator McNary said: “I question the wisdom of holding a national convention of Republicans or the wisdom of creating a commit tee on program to outline the policies of the Republican party at the pres ent time. There are fundamental is sues before Congress engaging the at tention of the people that require pa triotic treatment rather than party consideration. Hand-Picked Delegates. “It would be difficult to hold a na tional Republican convention or to select a committee on program with out the charge being made that the delegates had been hand-picked and the convention packed. For the pres ent time the Republican Senatorial Committee, the Republican Congres sional Committee and the Republican National Committee can take care of the politics of the party." At a meeting of the Republican Na tional Committee in Chicago recently a resolution was adopted authorizing the Executive Committee after con sultation with Republican members of Congress to select a committee on pro gram of 100 members. That com mittee would draft a declaration of principles and submit it to the Na tional Committee for future action. Senator McNary made it clear to day that he is opposed to setting up a program committee at this time and to having a declaration of prin ciples written. What effect his posi tion will have when the Executive Committee meets to pick the Program Committee remains to be seen. Summary of Today's Star Page. Page. Amusements .C-7 Radio -D-5 Comics .-D-10-11 Short Story--B-15 Editorials .A-8 Society ..B-3 Finance _A-15 Sports -_D-l-4 Lost & Found D-5 Woman’s Pg. C-6 Obituary_A-10 FOREIGN. Five Americans escape as Japanese planes bomb hospital. Page A-l Toklo leaves way open for L. S. to dis cuss peace in Far East. psge A-l Vargas claims democracy is basis for Brazil’s government. Page A-4 NATIONAL. Requisites of widespread building cited by Roosevelt. Page A-l Lower taxes for small businesses dis cussed. Page A-l Mine workers union assails D. A. R. for "insult.” Page A-2 Uncertainty surrounds first work of Congress. Page A-6 Labor Board assailed by A. F. of L. leader. Page A-12 WASHINGTON AND VICINITX. 1,300 Sanitary Grocery Co. employes go on strike. Page A-l Chest passes quarter mark in its big gest drive. Page A-l Rev. James A. Smyth named pastor of Sacred Heart Church. Page A-2 Negotiations resumed in WOL wage dispute. Page A-2 Minimum wages (or restaurant em ployes to be set. Page B-l « - I Medical Society studies plan to care for semi-indigent. Page B-l Gambling trial due to go to jury today. Page B-l Collins Joins fight on business privi lege tax. Page B-l G. W. U. alumni arriving for home coming celebration. Page B-l SPORTS. Cardinals, Colonials seen victors; Terps, Hoyas losers. Page D-l Colleges should adopt pro pass rule, says Grange. * Page D-l G. w. home-coming game tops list here this week. Page D-2 EDITORIAL AND COMMENT. Editorials. Page A-8 This and That. Page A-8 Answers to Questions. Page A-8 Political Mill. Page A-8 Washington Observations. Page A-8 David Lawrence. Page A-9 H. R. Baukhage. Page A-9 Dorothy Thompson. Page A-9 Constantine Brown. Page A-9 Lemuel Parton. Page A-9 MISCELLANY. Vital Statistics. Page B-8 Shipping News. Page B-12 Bedtime Stories. Page C-2 Nature’s Children. Page C-S City News in Brief. Page C-5 Dorothy Dix. Page C-6 Betsy Caswell. Page. C-fi Cross-word puzzle. Page D-U Letter-Out. Page D-1C Winning Contract. Page D-U Traffic Convictions. Page D-12 I i “/. Q.” Tests Are Abandoned In Rating Police and Firemen With the approval of the Civil Serv ice Commission the District Commis sioners today eliminated the so-called “I. Q.” tests which have been used for years in examinations for the promo tions of members of the Police and Fire Departments. A new rating system which will be used hereafter in the Civil Service examination for promotions will give a much better break to the older mem bers of the departments who have had valuable experience records but who are unable to compete on an equal basis with the younger and better schooled men who traditionally have topped the older men on the mental examinations. Commissioner Melvin C. Hazen ex pressed pleasure at the change and re minded reporters he had been fifhting for a change in the rule ever since he became a Commissioner four years ago. Hereafter experience and fitness will be given a 50 per cent weight in the examination and the rest will go to practical questions on rules, regula tions and actual work, and (in the Police Department only) on law. >. £ Heretofore, experience and fitness were given 50 per cent weight, but only 30 per cent went to answers to practical questions and 20 per cent weight was given to answers to the mental or “L Q." questions. The Federal agency also approved recommendations by the Commission ers for other changes in regard to pro motions. By unanimous vote the Civil Service Commission agreed that, in order to be eligible for examination for promotion to the next grade, the private must serve six years, a ser geant three years and a lieutenant two years in their respective grades. Also a more standard rule was established for the holding of pro motional examinations. Normally, hereafter, they are to be held every two years, in October. The next ex amination for members of the Fire De partment will be held in October, 1938. Since time for an examination for policemen for this year has passed, an examination will be called at the earliest possible date, according to a statement by L. A. Moyer, chief ex aminer of the Civil Service Commis sion. I HOUSE TAX UNIT HUNTS WAY TO 1 Reduction of Levy on About 85 Per Cent of Businesses Discussed. VINSON POINTS OUT NEED FOR PROGRAM Disparity of Large and Corpora tions' Burdens Cited by Head of Group. B? the Associated Press. A House tax subcommittee talked today of aiding little business men by reducing the tax burden on perhaps 85 per cent of the Nation's small firms. Chairman Vinson said some system might be worked out for graduating taxes on the small firms on a lowered level. No decisions were made on how this might be done, he said, but “we are hoping to lessen their burden." He added: “They have more need of retaining their net income, relatively, to build up their businesses.” He said there was “quite some dis parity” between the relative tax bur dens of the small and large corpora tions. This disparity, he said, the subcommittee may attempt to remove in part. In 1935, he* said 85 per cent of the corporations had a net income of less than $10,000. There is no question that these fall in the category of small concerns, he said, but the committee probably will draw the line between small and big firms at somewhere above a $10,000 net income. Net Incomes Under $50,000. More than 93 per cent of corpora tions filing tax returns had net in comes of less than $50,000 in 1935. he said. Of the more than 500,000 corpora tions in the United States, the chair man asserted, about 200,000 have net incomes. Mr. Vinson said the subcommittee also took up again today the question of relief from the undistributed profits tax for debt-ridden corporations, those which have accumulated a deficit at the start of a taxable year and those coming out of bankruptcy or reorgani zation. Meanwhile, statements from Demo cratic and Republican Senators gave new impetus to a growing campaign to reduce business taxes. Harrison Urges Modification. From Chairman Harrison. Democrat. of Mississippi, of the Senate Finance Committee came the unqualified asser tion that “there must be some mod ification of the undistributed profits tax.” Senator Harrison, telegraphing this statement to Secretary of the Treas ury Morgenthau from his home late yesterday, added that the administra tion should endeavor “to restore con fidence to business.” Other legislators spoke in the same vein, praising Mr. Morgenthau’s stand for balancing the budget through re trenchment. but private comments of some Congressmen indicated they »vie nut riiuiuMctijut aooui irunimng expenditures a few months before they are up for re-election. Mr. Morgenthau had said in a speech Wednesday that some of the taxes which have inspired objections from business and the public might be ended if expenses were cut. Vandenberg Hits Profits Tax. Senator Vandenberg, Republican, of Michigan, like Senator Harrison, struck at the profits tax. “Under this levy,” he said, “a com pany can’t accumulate a nickel to be used for new employment, plant ex pansion and reserves. “We have all the raw materials for an unprecedented prosperity and if the Government would give business half a chance we could attain it.’’ The recurrent question of tax exempt securities came before a House tax subcommittee. Senator King, Democrat, of Utah expressed concern that Morgenthau's economy proposals might not suc ceed. "As long as there are public de mands for Federal funds,” Senator King said, “Congress undoubtedly will continue to vote them, because public appropriations are the most powerful vote-getting instrument a Congress man has.” Mr. Morgcninau naa suggesiea mat 1939 expenditures could be brought into line with revenue by a $700,000, 000 cut in appropriations for roads, public works, relief and agriculture. No Comment From Agencies. There was no comment from most agencies handling these funds, but offi cials of the Bureau of Roads said definite commitments would prevent as large a cut in road expenditures as Mr. Morgenthau proposed, unless Con gress took action at the special session beginning next week. The Treasury Secretary had sug gested there might be a return to the pre-depression figure of $100,000,000 a year in road spending. He estimated this year’s figure would be $253,000,000. Of $900,000,000 in agriculture ex penditures which Mr. Morgenthau said might be reduced, about $700,000,000 is for regular department functions and the Soil Conservation Service. The latter’s cost is expected to ap proach $50,000,000 this year, and de partment economists have estimated that the new farm program, which will embrace it, will cost $700,600,000 or more. Mr. Morgenthau gave $535,000,000 as the prospective total this year for public works—items for which Con gressmen receive especial pressure from their home districts. Appropri ations and allocations already made for 1939 total more than $600,000,000. Bulgarian King Goes Home. LONDON, Nov. 12 (£>).—King Boris of Bulgaria, accompanied by Queen Giovanna &?d their 4-year-old daugh ter. Princess Marie Louise, started for home today after a week’s visit in London. They planned to stop at Calais, France, before proceeding to Sofia. I

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