10 Mayıs 1936 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1

10 Mayıs 1936 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1
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WEATHER. ' (TJ. 8 Weather Bureau rorecast) t Mostly cloudy and cooler today: tomor- Full Associated Pl'eSS row cloudy: moderate northeast, shifting Npws and WirpnVmfnc to east or southeast winds. Temperatures TNeWS anUYV lTepnOtOS —Highest. 90, at 4 p.m yesterday: low- OUnday Morning and eat. 67, at 2 a.m, yesterday. Everv Aftprrmnn Full report on Page B-2. ^very Aliernoon. _ _ (A>) Mean* Associated Press. No. 1,625-No. 33,612. tsaSK.'Tg_WASHINGTON, D. C„ SUNDAY MORNING, MAY 10, 1936-116 PAGES. »_.^£»C^£Tg&TO0Rm | CENTS MUSSOLINI PROCLAIMS REBIRTH OF EMPIRE IN CHALLENGE TO WORLD King Gets Title of Emperor in Decree. GEN. BADOGLIO NEW VICEROY Fascist Thousands Hear II Du ce Hail Victory. BACKGROUND 111 the 14 years since he seized control of the Italian government in the name of the Fascists. Mus solini has been adding to the "glory" of the state. Internal re form came first, a long, costly, slow process based on militarism and rigid regimentation. There came the time for expansion abroad and “a place in the sun." The objective teas Ethiopia on the east coast of Africa. Mussolini was victor before the first gun was fired last October. It was merely a question of how long would be necessary for the conquest. It took' seven months. Then Rome was reborn as an em pire. ROME. May 9.—Benito Mus solini, after 15 centuries, pro claimed the restoration of the Roman Empire of the Caesars tonight. Decreeing total Italian sovereignty over conquered Ethiopia and proclaim ing Victor Emmanuel, his King, to be Emperor of that primitive land, II Duce gave back to his millions of people a reborn empire "on the seven fateful hills of Rome.” From his Palazzo Venezia balcony, standing in the lurid light of search lights and flares, he shouted: "The Italian people have created an empire with their blood. They will fertilize it with their work and will defend it against any one with their men!" Thousands Pledge Aid. From the thousands of civilians and war-armed soldiers who packed Vene zia Square he demanded a pledge: •‘Will you be worthy of it?” "Si! Si!” their response came back In a great and echoing roar. The decrees of empire, rushed swift ly through successive meetings of the Grand Fascist Council and the Italian cabinet, made Marshal Pietro Badoglio viceroy of Ethiopia. It was he who broke the back of aavage Ethiopian resistance and marched dowm out of the mountains to capture Addis Ababa as Emperor Haile Selassie fled into self-exile. Marshal Badoglio's appointment was regarded by most observers as only temporary. It was expected he would return to Italy in mid-June and that a political appointee would succeed him as viceroy. Long before the Grand Council fathered, to receive the salute from Black-shirt musketeers of 11 Duce’s own bodyguard, the square was fill ing with the thousands who heard and saw the dictator. Sons in Ethiopia Listen. Other millions in far comers of the earth heard his words by radio— among them his aviator sons. Vittorio and Bruno, in Addis Ababa. While the crowd in the square (See ITALY, page A-5.) I -• CLOUDS TO RELIEVE HOT SPELL TODAY Storms Cause Two Deaths and Considerable Damage in Ar kansas and Texas. Overcast skies today were due to temper a Spring sun that has burned the Capital and most of the East with Bummer intensity two days. Although rain was not included in the forecast for this section, the Weather Bureau said this afternoon and tomorrow would be somewhat cooler than yesterday, which saw the mercury climb to 90 for the second consecutive day. While the States east of the Western plain sweltered. tornadic winds caused two deaths and considerable damage in Arkansas and Texas yes terday, according to Associated Press dispatches. The same storm seriously Injured at least one other person and destroyed 15 farm homes. At Raton. N. Mex., 150 travelers re cuperated from the experience of be ing marooned a night and a day in a sudden May blizzard, which accom panied bitter cold in the mountain area. Snow plows cut through to •trended motorists, bus passengers and truckers late Friday. One of the warm spots yesterday was Centrelia, 111., where 95 degrees, the season's wannest, was reached. In Chicago, 87 was recorded for the second day in a row. Most of New York State sweltered in mid-Summer heat, as did areas as far West as Western Iowa. The high in Washington yesterday was an even 90, reached at 5 p.m. The maximum was 2 degrees below Fri day's 92. an all-time May 8 mark. Backed by Townsendites. LINCOLN, Nebr., May 9 (/P).—E. J. Bpeake, State manager of the Town aend Pension Clubs, announced to night the organization would back Terry Carpenter for United States Senator and planned to have an in dependent candidate for Congress in every district where the Democratic and Republican nominees both were unfriendly to the Townsend plan. A A Britain Orders Mobilization To Show Strength at Malta All Leaves Canceled as Forces Prepare for Display to Coincide With League Sanctions Session. By the Associated Press. LONDON. May 9—Great Britain tonight ordered her land and air de fenses on the Island of Malta dis played in a gigantic test mobiliza tion. Officers and men of all insular de fense units were instructed to take their posts Tuesday and Wednesday at the same time the League of Na tions Council debates war sanctions at Geneva. The demonstration was designed to show the reinforced strength of the j island base, virtually evacuated by ; the grand fleet last August when | Italy's East African campaign threat ! ened British interests in the Medi i terranean. All shore and foreign leaves of | British defense forces were canceled for the period of the mobilization, l Scouting planes will be sent to sea to make aerial observations. Big gun crews of underground sta- j tions. anti-aircraft, coast defense and fortress artillery batteries have been commanded to their stations. A new flotilla of destroyers ar- j rived at Gibraltar today to take over the duties of a relief ship returning to England on leave The concentration of British naval strength is to continue, diplomatic quarters believe, until the Fascist forces in Libya are reduced. Anthony Eden, youthful foreign secretary, left by plane for Paris on his way to preside at the League Council table Monday. He left behind a crumbling front for continuance of war sanctions against Italy, with such notable defec tions from the ranks of supporters as Winston Churchill, veteran statesman, and Sir Austen Chamberlain, former foreign secretary. (Churchill voiced his opinion Fri day in a speech at Chingford, Essex, when he said: "I am not prepared to support sanctions against Italy merely for the purpose of injuring and weak ening the Italian people.” Cham berlain launched his attack on war penalties in the House of Commons debate Wednesday at which Eden as serted "the League of Nations must go on!”) GENEVA SIRED BY Smaller Powers Uneasy Over Possible ‘“Punish ment” for Sanctions. Ey the Associated Press. GENEVA, May 9.—Premier Benito j Mussolini's announcement of Italian annexation of Ethiopia and re-crea-j tion of the Roman Empire came as a profound shock tonight to Geneva— j although it had been forecast days ago. One League of Nations official had reported, prior to II Duce’s declara- i tion, there was a hardening view that sanctions against the Fascist nation should be maintained, even though Ethiopia is now vanquished. Representatives of nations on the League Council were gathering for the ninety-second session of that body, I which will again consider the Ethio pian situation. Delegates from neutral countries who were in conferences here were especially impressed with the possible significance of Mussolini's latest move in connection with future developments in Europe. In other words, they viewed it as an extremely dangerous example.; likely to be imitated on the continent of Europe. Fear Sanctions Policy. It strengthened the fear, already expressed at an afternoon conference, that small neutral nations might find themselves in a perilous position if they again should join the League in sanctions against a great power. They reasoned that if it is possible for a big power simply to swallow a j small power, regardless of League j sanctions, it is possible for a big power j in the future to seek conquest on the j European continent and punish the small countries which dared partici pate in sanctions. German observers here are more numerous than at previous Italo-Ethi opian turning points at Geneva. They seem particularly interested to learn whether the League will accept the accomplished fact of annexation or "do something about it.” Small neutral nations were said to be determined to oppose vigorously any Italian attempt to expel the Ethiopian delegate from Monday's council meeting. Move Held "Pretty Raw.” Some nations, an official of the League said, regarded Italy's move to annex outright sis “pretty raw.” He conceded, however, that the business interests of many nations demanded a prompt lifting of the penalties of “aggression." In Paris, the Ethiopian envoy, Wolde Mariam, announced he would go to Geneva Monday to plead for "justice against Italy.” He said he was acting on orders from Ethiopia’s "new secret capital,” and claimed the Ethiopian (See-LEAGUE, Page A-l~3~)~~ PLANS 9 MORE TEST Eckener Convinced Best Route Is North or South of Ship Lanes. BY LADY DRUMMOND-HAY. LAKEHURST, N. J„ May 9.—From the coast of Europe at Flushing. Hol land. to America in 55 .hours and 15 minutes; from the line of Southamp ton and Cherborough to New York in 52 hours and 45 minutes; from Fried richshafen in South Germany to New York. 3,745 miles, in 60 hours and 15 minutes—that is the time and record established by the German super Zeppelin Hlndenburg when we cruised over the sleeping City of New York before dawn this morning, and later moored at Lakehurst. The first of a series of 10 round-trip experimental flights under the direc tion and command of Dr. Hugo Eck ener and Capt. Ernest Lehmann to de termine the practicability of commer cial, passenger and mail air traffic be tween Europe and the United States over the North Atlantic can indeed be called a success. Between 800 and 3.000 feet above j the gray Atlantic, through clouds, mists, rains, squalls, over icebergs and through short bursts of sunshine, we j "flew” and all so smoothly that we hardly realized we were moving. Free from the noise and motion of ' i See HINDENBURG, page A-6 j ~ -• NAZIS UlSrLtAStU BY BRITISH NOTE __ Locarno Questionnaire Sharply Criticized by Foreign Office. By the Assoclateo Press BERLIN, May 9.—The Nazi for eign office, using what for diplomats was sharp language, disclosed its dis appointment today with the British Locarno questionnaire. However, officials said Germany would make a careful examination of the memorandum. (The memorindum asked whether Germany now regards herself in a position to conclude "genuine trea ties,” whether her desire for equality has been fulfilled and whether her proposal for non-aggression pacts can cover Russia, Latvia and Estonia.) The Wilhelmstrasse, speaking through its mouthpiece, the Deutsche Politische Korrespondenz, questioned Britain's motives. It said recent developments in fluencing European affairs had not been taken sufficiently into considera tion. It referred especially to the Franco-Russian mutual assistance pact, which, it said, remained one of Germany’s first concerns. “Oh, Yeah!” Father’s Comment On Quadruplets Born in Jersey by the Associated Press. PASSAIC, N. J„ May 9.—Quadrup lets were born at St. Mary's Hospital today and the father, never batting an eyelash, commented, “Oh, yeah!” While a hospital staff, wild with excitement, rushed out to borrow extra incubators, and the delivering physi cian sought to aid the mother. Mrs. Emil Kasper of Little Perry, the babies started a wailing quartet, which doctors said augured well for their chances of life. The largest, however, weighs only a fraction of an ounce more than 3 pounds and two of them weigh only 2 pounds and 14 ounces each. Dr. Prank P. Jani. who delivered them, said it would be three days before he could predict their chances of life. He immediately put them on a diet of sweetened water and two drops of whisky every two hours. Kasper.' now the father of six chil dren. with the oldest one only 3. is a 120-a-week laborer in a railroad j roundhouse at Secaucus. 1 ■% „i * "When I told the father the news.” Dr. Jani remarked, “he was abso lutely unemotional, stoical, unrespon sive. All he said was, ‘Oh yeah?’ ” The physician said he had told Kasper to expect twins. Dr. Jani had previously delivered two chil dren of the Kaspers. Ellen, now 3, »nd Ralph. 1% years old. Mrs. Kasper bore up well until the fourth baby arrived, nearly three hours after the first. That one proved s severe strain on her, the doctor said, but “she is a robust woman and L have every hope for her recovery.” She was transferred from a ward bo a private room as the guest of the hospital and was given day and night nurses. “The babies were a little prema ture,” Dr. Jani said, “but they appear bo be fully normal in every respect. They are crying lustily now.” Tomorrow, he said, he hopes to start them on a milk formula. The Kaspers came to the United State* from Germany. He is 47 yean »kl and his wife, #4. fHERECOME \ MY WANDERING BOYS! / LAN'SAKES, A HOW THEY'VE 'A £ MOTHER’S DAY. 1936! Cripples Bivouacked in W.P.A. To Await Arrival of Hopkins 33 6f: nem ploynbles9 Refuse to Quit Con ference Room—New York Group Is Led by Girl. m/ w. P. A. headquarters was in a state I of siege last night as a delegation of 33 crippled members of the League for the Physically Handicapped from New York held stubborn possession of a conference room on the seventh floor, which they had occupied early in the day, refusing to leave until Admin istrator Harry L. Hopkins grants them a personal hearing. ■'We'll hold this fort until Monday ; or longer." Sylvia Flexer. lame presi- ' dent of the league, warned embar rassed and harassed W. P. A. officials. Hopkins, the latter tried to explain, wasn't in the building and couldn't j possibly see them under any circum- j stances. I "Then we H stay right here and force him to see us,” the militant girl leader declared as a loud chorus of approval indicated the siege was on and not to be lifted until Hopkins came to terms. Bedraggled and tired from a 13-hour ride by truck, frayed nerves of the young men and women suddenly snapped at a morning hearing before two of Hopkins' aides, when they were told finally there was nothing W. P. A. could do to give them Jobs or prefer ential treatment. A quiet and orderly conference of an hour ended in a noisy uproar as Thad Holt, assistant ad ministrator. rose to leave. Henry Friedman, who had been (See SIEGE. Page A-2.)— TO 60-YEAR TERM U. S. Closes Weyerhaeuser Kidnap Case 48 Hours After Capture. By the Associated Press. TACOMA. Wash., May 9—Scar faced William Mahan mumbled ‘•guilty” today, received a 60-year sentence and was bundled off to Fed eral prison for engineering the $200, 000 kidnaping of 9-year-old George Weyerhaeuser, timber fortune heir. The Government left hanging over him a mail extortion indictment on which it might, if it chooses, add a possible life sentence to his punish ment. An hour after pronouncement of sentence and only 48 hours after his capture, Mahan was "dressed in” at McNeil Island Prison, in Puget Sound. United States District Attorney Owen P. Hughes quoted Mahan as disclosing that during 11 months of precarious (See MAHAN, page ,A-137) i . 11 i Readers’ Guide PART ONE. Main News Section. General News—Pages A-l to B-6. Lost and Found—A-3. Death Notices—A-10. Vital Statistics—A-10. Educational—B-6. Sports Section—Pages B-7 to B-ll. Boating and Fishing News— B-ll. PART TWO. Editorial Section. Editorial Articles—Pages D-l, D-3. Editorials and Editorial Fea tures—D-2. Civic News and Commentr—D-4. Veterans’ Organizations, Nation al Guard and Organized Reserves—D-5, D-6. Women’s Clubs. Parent-Teacher Activities—D-6, D-7. Contract—D-7. Resorts—D-8, D-9. PART THREE. Society Section. Society News and Comment— Pages E-l to E-10. Well-Known Folk—E-3. Barbara Bell Pattern—E-9.

PART FOUR. r eaiure section. News Features—Pages F-l, F-4. John Clagett Proctor’s Article on Old Washington—F-2. “Those Were the Happy Days,” by Dick Mansfield—F-2. Radio News and Programs—F-3. Stage and Screen—F-5. Automobiles—F-6. Aviation—F-6. Cross-word Puzzle—F-6. Children’s Page—F-7. High Lights of History—F-7. Stamps—F-8. PART FIVE. Financial, Classified. Financial News and Comment, Stock, Bond and Curb Sum maries—Pages G-l to G-5. Public Library—G-5. Classified Advertising Pages 0-5 to G-15. 1 I SEEN IN SENATE Leaders Plan Talk With Roosevelt—Adjournment Seen by June 6. BACKGROUND— Senate Finance Committee is pre paring to report tax bill based on measure passed about 10 days ago by House. Pressure ol business op position and doubts of conservative Democrats, however, may result in revising provision for taxing un distributed corporation profits. An innovation, this levy was requested by President Roosevelt as substitute for existing corporate taxes. riv me Associated Press. Opposition to the administration's tax bill crystallized yesterday in a con ference at which half a dozen Demo cratic members of the Senate Finance Committee discussed possible alterna tives. • Members attending the conference said no agreement had been reached, but that a number of substitutes for the proposed tax on undistributed corporate profits would be presented when the Finance Committee goes into executive session tomorrow to consider the bill. DesDite the wide snlit within the Finance Committee over the legisla tion. evidenced by the Democratic conference, and the announced op* position of Senator Couzens, Republi can, of Michigan, Senator Robinson of Arkansas, Democratic leader, made the definite prediction yesterday that Congress would be able to adjourn before the national political conven tions. The Arkansan said Congress would conclude the session by June 6 at the latest, and possibly by June 1. Will Confer With Roosevelt. There were indications that Sen ate leaders soon would attempt to work out with President Roosevelt some modification of the tax bill as passed by the House to meet objec tions raised at Senate public hear ings. and smooth the way to the quick action necessary for an adjournment early in June. Among the wavering Democratic Senators there was much talk of a compromise which would leave the present corporate rate structure intact, with a surtax imposed cm undis tributed corporation profits. Chairman Harrison of the Finance Committee said this plan would be considered, but asserted that "the President's ideas will prevail in the enactment of this legislation.'' In response to a recommendation “ (SeeTAXES page A-4.) California Quakes Continue. MINERAL, Calif., May 9 UP).— Earthquakes, 41 of which have been felt here recently, grew stronger today, with 18 recorded since yesterday. Strongest temblors were experienced at 1:40 and 9:30 this morning, and at 13:20 this afternoon. Lost and Found Advertisements Page 3, Column 1 ft ' Only Political Miracle Will Win for Borah, Says Observer. BY G. GOULD LINCOLN. Staff Correspondent of The Star. COLUMBUS. Ohio. May 9—Re publican voters in Ohio will troop to the polls Tuesday to elect their 52 delegates to the Republican National Convention. Barring a political miracle, the great majority of those chosen will be Landon delegates, although they wear the thin veneer of Robert A. Taft, the favorite son candidate. The miracle would be the election of the delegate slate pledged to Sena tor Borah of Idaho. This Borah slate contains, however, the names of only 35 candidates, 7 at large and 28 district delegates. Like a stag at biy. the Idaho Sena tor is facing the pack. He has against him, first, the entire Republican organization of Ohio, from State Chairman Ed Schorr and Walter V. Brown, the national committeeman, on down the line. In addition, he has against him the "field" of other aspir ants for the Republican nomination. J Including Gov. Alf M. landon of Kan sas. Col. Frank Knox. Chicago pub lisher. and Senator Dickinson of Iowa. I and all their friends, who are backing , the Taft slate of delegates. Borah Throws Scare. Despite these tremendous odds, ; Borah has thrown a scare into the j organization, particularly in several districts. For a week, he has been going up and down the State hurling bitter epithets at the organization leaders. Some of his crowds have been large. The organization leaders recall what rural Illinois did for Borah in that State's primary several weeks ago. In a party primary election the organization almost always has the advantage. It gets out its own voters, and unless there is an upheaval of sen timent. it wins. The organization be lieves it has the situation well in hand. It concedes that Borah may elect three or four district delegate;, but does not agree that he will. More impartial observers say that perhaps the Borah people will elect one dele date at large, although that is doubt ful, and five or six district delegates. The Borah managers are hopeful of electing 10 delegates, and they say that if they elect as many as 15 It would be a great victory for them, as it would. Landon Makes Progress. The Landon - for - President, move ment In this State has made great progress among the Republicans. The Kansas Governor appeals to their imagination. They do not know him— except what they have read and heard of him. But it is said by the profes sionals that if the entire favorite-son slate of delegates should be elected at least 42 of them would be favorable to Landon and ready to jump to him j (See POLITICS, page A-4.) ' 25 PER CENT CUT IN PI A. ORDERED WITH FUND DENIAL Ickes Directs Chiefs to Pre pare List of Workers to Be Dropped. FINAL ACTION AWAITS RELIEF BILL PASSAGE Beiter Charges “Un-American’’ Tactics Used by House Leaders. Vote on Monday. BACKGROUND— Pending in House is appropria tion bill carrying SI.425.000,000 fund for relief in coming fiscal year. Long battle has been waged be hind scenes to have generous por tion of fund earmarked for P. TV. A., but Administrator Hopkins and his TV. P. A. seem assured of controlling spending privileges. Administration majority beat down P. W. A. bloc on House floor during past week, also repelling Republican attempt to effect decentralization of TV. P.A. Only major change made on floor was inserting prevailing wage pro vision for work-relief wages. By the Associated Press. The refusal of the House to ear mark part of the $1,425,000,000 relief funds for the Public Works Adminis tration was promptly followed yes terday by an order from Secretary Ickes. directing that steps be taken toward slashing the size of his P. W. A. staff. Another echo came when Repre sentative Beiter, Democrat, of New York, leader of the defeated House P. W. A. bloc, charged that ‘'un American” tactics had been employed by the Democratic leadership in side tracking his earmarking proposal without a House vote on a ruling that such an amendment was not “ger mane.” Beiter expressed confidence that the Senate would be more favorably in clined to give P. W. A. some of the big fund reserved for Harry Hopkins’ Works Progress Administration when the House sends the $2,364,229,712 relief and deficiency bill to it tomor row after the formality of a final vote. Ickes. nevertheless, announced two curtailing steps. Instructs Division Head*. First, an order was sent to division heads, both in Washington and in the field, directing them to prepare lists of 25 per cent of the P. W. A. administrative employes who could be dropped. At the same time, any further pay increases were forbidden, i Possibly with an eye to awaiting j action in the Senate, where the ear- ; marking idea really originated and j will be revived. P. W. A. officials ex plained the order would not be carried out immediately. The lists of those in line to go if necessary, however, are to be sent in at once. Nine thousand persons are on the P. W. A. administrative staff. 3,000 of them in Washington. The housing division alone employs 1.000. Ickes conferred for an hour yester day with President Roosevelt, but was silent as to the details of his visit when he left the White House. Belter Denounces Strategy. Beiter, whose long campaign to marshal strength for a floor battle exploded under the pressure of dip lomatic maneuvering, issued a formal statement denouncing that strategy. *T believe the action of those in charge of piloting the bill through the House in preventing a vote on my amendment was un-American,” he declared. "If this is representative government. I fail to see it. "The bloc in favor of earmarking j part of the relief proposal for public works had a majority on the floor of the House and would, without doubt, have carried the amendment offered (See RELIEF, page A-7.) --• WEEPS AT JAIL DOOR -- Harborer of Van Meter Says Dil linger Planned to Surrender. LEAVENWORTH, Kans.. May 9 (iPj. —Louis Piquett, Chicago attorney, wept today as he entered Federal Penitentiary here to start his 2-year term for harboring Homer Van Meter, a Dillinger gangster. Piquett said that John Dillinger. for whom Piquett acted as attorney, had planned shortly before his death at the hands of Federal agents to sur render "in a day or so.” FIVE HURT AS FIRE AND BLASTS RAZE K STREET FACTORV Three Firemen, Employe In jured When Explosion Starts Blaze. THOUSANDS ATTRACTED BY FLAMES AND SMOKE Police Boat Blows Up Responding to One of Three Alarms. Officer Is Hurt. (Picture on Page B-l.) A fire started by an explosion and fed by gasoline storage tanks de stroyed the American Chlorophyll, Inc., plant at 3240 K street last night and injured three firemen and one plant employe, two seriously. A po liceman also was injured by an ex plosion in a police boat responding to one of the three alarms which fol lowed each other in quick succession. The blaze and thick columns of smoke, which covered the streets ad jacent to the plant, and spread over the Potomac River as far away as Potomac Park, attracted thousands of spectators, who thronged the streets and crowded on fences and housetops on the Georgetown hillside, which rises from the river back of the plant. Sixteen explosions followed the first blast. Stanley Entler 35, on duty on the night shift, was on the first floor when the explosion occurred just be fore 6 o’clock. Burned on the face, hands and arms, he ran across the street to give the alarm. After re ceiving first-aid treatment from Henrv R. Davis, ship chandler, at 3205 K street, he was taken to Emergency Hospital. He lives at 2626 Pennsyl vania avenue. Dr. Frank M. Schertz, plant chem ist. of 1305 Farragut street and E. M. Thompson, another plant employe, were working on the third floor of the building when the explosion took place, presumably in one of the 50 gallon gasoline tanks used in dis tilling the chlorophyll. They rushed down to safety before the flames spread throughout the structure and turned the interior into a roaring furnace. Blast Injures fireman. Among the first companies to reach the scene was number 16 engine. A* Lieut. H. F. Harding was directing his men at the side of the flaming build ing. an explosion blew- out a double door and knocked him to the ground unconscious. A sheet of flame leaped out over him as he lay prostrate and enveloped Sergt. M. C. Mason, who had come to his side. As Mason staggered backward Sergt, Elmer F. Stein of number 2 engine company rushed to Lieut. Harding's rescue, dragging his inert body to safety. Harding was removed to Emergency Hospital, where his bums were described as serious. Mason was taken to the hospital also, but is not in serious condition. W. J. Schmitz. 39. of number 9 engine company, was burned on the hands by chemicals while working near the building, but returned to duty after receiving first aid treat ment by the number one rescue squad. Acting Chief Engineer John Car rington arrived on the scene shortly after* the second alarm was turned In and took charge in the absence of Fire Chief Charles E. Schrom. Men placed at points of vantage on all sides of the structure and the tops of freight cars along K street poured a continuous stream of water through every available door and window. Police Boat Explodes. Pvt. Lemuel Baliles. 33, of the har bor precinct was burned on the face and hands when the police boat in which he was preparing to start to the fire was wrecked by an explosion. When he stepped on the starter, a spark ig nited gasoline in the bilge water. The explosion blew off the roof of the cabin of the 50-foot cruiser and hurled Baliles against a bulkhead. The hull caught fire and was badly damaged before the blaze was extinguished. Baliles was also taken to Emergency Hospital. Attracted by the smoke and the fire tug which rushed to the fire at an early alarm, scores of canoeists, .hany in swimming suits, paddled to the scene. Their craft were soon floating in a film as the green dye. flushed out of the building, poured into the river. The heavy pall of smoke which cov ered the street like a fog more than a block away hampered the firemen working on the windward side of the plant and gas masks were put into ut» (See FIRE, Page A-4.) 2 MEN ENTOMBED IN WELL RESCUED One Buried for More Than Four Hours—Neither Suffers Injuries. By the Associated Press. WAYLAND, Mass., May 9—Rescue workers, spurred on by prayers and :ears, pulled two men late today from the bottom of a 20-foot newly dug sell where they had been trapped by i cave-ln. One of the men. William Sinclair, 19, was taken out about half an hour ifter heavy planking gave way and entombed him with Earl Hartwell, 42. Sinclair was not hurt. Hartwell was rescued nearly four lours later after more than 100 men lad dug a trench to reach him. He was badly shaken up and bruised, but declined medical attention. As the rescue workers dug their trench, Hartwell’s wife and five chil dren stood by, weeping and praying. Both men, after they reached safety, mid they prayed on their own account In the well. Every available police officer In Wayland was called to the scene, as were State troopers and firemen from Framingham. Neighbors also aided In the work. « Wives of Neiv Dealers Stock Pantries With uInterests99 Goods nr tsKLisLK oanutnun. Although the Senate Lobby Com mittee has figuratively spanked sev eral 'members of the House for what it considers their too close associa tion with representatives of the “in terests,” it develops that it has not yet made the House members really sensitive about them. Wives of those members who came in with the New Deal revolution in 1933, it is learned, have their pantries still stocked with products which the “interests" gave them for a pound party about two weeks ago. It is es tlm/ied that almost a carload of hams, bacon, butter and whatnot was given for the party. It was given by the so-called Sev enty-three Club, that is, the members who were first elected to the Seventy third Congress. The idea. It is under stood, was for each member, or at least those members who could ar range such things, to bring something from an industry peculiar to his State which would fit in. Thus, it is known that a Chicago packing house sent 100 pounds of bacon, another a quan tity of ham. From Iowa State College, which does not come under the cate gory of “interests.” of course, came 100 pounds of butter It resulted in there being enough stuff to feast kings with a lot of left-overi. A maiiiicdii v, tut p,uvou3 *v — luncheon held at the Congressional Club on New Hampshire avenue— could not eat all of the produce that was avail/ble, or rather they could not at this one sitting. So when the luncheon was over the wives gathered up armfuls of canned corn beef, of cheese, of potted ham—well, most everything that one could think of— and went home rejoicing. Aside from the f—<istuffs there were all sorts of souvenirs. For example, one industry, it could not be ascer tained which, sent along countless little rubber automobiles. These were taken home by the wives, too, as were the rubber coasters which were sent by still another industry—you know, those coasters which yod put the glasses on. Mrs. Henry Wallace, wife of the Secretary of Agriculture, was there. There were altogether about 100 peo ple. it is understood. Thirty-six Senators only a short while ago either turned down or turned over to charity, crates >ii celery which they had been sent by a grateful Sanford, Fla., body of citi zens, in appreciation of the Senators' vote against the Florida ship canal. Mrs Colden. the wife of Representa tive Colden of California, is head of the Seventy-Three Club. P> \

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