15 Eylül 1932 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1

15 Eylül 1932 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1
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WEATHER. (U. S. Weather Bureau Forecast.) Cloudy, probably occasional rain to night. ending tomorrow morning; cooler tomorrow. Temperatures—Highest. 81, at 1:15 p.m yesterday; lowest, 62, at 6 30 a.m. today. Full report on page 9. Closing Ν. Y. Markets, Pages 14,15 & 16 The only evening paper in Washington with the Associated Press news service. Yesterday's Circulation, 115,212. No. 32,279. Kntered as second class matter post offite. Washington, D. C. WASHINGTON, D. C., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1932—FIFTY-FOUR PAGES. φφφ 14») Means Aa«ociat«d Press. TWO CENTS. ITALY BEGINS HUNT FOR Ml» PLANE DUE LAST MIDNIGHT Ail Civil and Military Pilots Ordered to Join Search for American Nurse. CRAFT LAST REPORTED OFF IRELAND YESTERDAY Fears Felt That Ship May Be Down Some Place in Area of Mediterranean Sea. By the Associated Pr*»ss. HOME, September 15.—Every search ing agency under the control of the Italian government was set to work to day to find the missing monoplane. American Nurse, which had disap peared on a non-stop flight from New York to Rome. She was du·? here la.st midnight with her crew of two men and a woman, but ' there was no report of the plane after 11:50 a.m. yesterday when a steamer reported sighting it 4C0 miles off the Southern Coast of Ireland. As soon as he was certain that the furl must be exhausted even if there had been no accident. Gen. Italo Balbo, the minister for air, ordered all pilots, military ar.d civil, on land and sea, to search for signs of the plane or for wreckage. Forestry workers, lighthouse keepers, warships and merchantmen, as well as the entire national police force were instructed to be vigilant. Doing Everything Possible. Aviation authorities doubted that the plane had reached Italy, but the gov ernment notified the American military attache that everything possible was being done. When darkness approached last night the huge military airpcrt at Ciampino turned on its ground lights and from dusk to dawn the finger of a great searchlight swept the sky. A large j ground crew was kept ready all night, j It was expected that the thorough I srarch already under way would quickly ! eliminate the possibility that the plane ! might have landed or crashed some where in Italy. If the American Nurse is down or lcet it would be the third failure of an attempt to fly from New York to Rome. In 1927 the Old Glory was lost with three victims at sea In 1929 Roger Williams and Lewis H. Yancey started for Rome, but landed in Spain. Members of Party. At 1:16 a.m. today the 43 hturs given as the '.imit of time the American Nur:e's gasoline supply could last had j passed. On board are William tTlbrich. pilot, of Mineola. Ν. Y.: Miss Edna Newcomer, 28-year-old undergraduate nurse of Wil Jiamsport. Pa., and Dr. Leon M. Pisculii of Yonkers. Ν. Y., the commander cf the expedition. The chief anxiety was that the plane's gasoline supply might have given out over the Mediterranean area. Reports of ships which sighted her yesteraay j over the Atlantic indicated the plane I Wis steering a reasonably true but ! northerly course. While the flcodlights were burning at the Ciampino Airpcrt. those at other fields were turned off to prevent the plane going astray in the vicinity of Rome. Darkened By Eclipse. An eclip'ç of the moon over Italy dur ing the night caused extreme darkness, prohibiting possibilities of sighting the j plane at night. The ship carried no rsdio. Among these who spent the night at the field were Col. McCabe, United States military and air attache to Rome, ar.c! his assistant, Capt. Francis N. Bi fdy. Gen. Balbo remained ready through out the night to go to the field if the flyers arrived at Florence, where MUs Newcomer intended to drop trom the plane in a parachute. Many people staved awake well into the morning, hoping to see her. GULF STORM HEADING TOWARD WASHINGTON Rain and Cooler Weather Likely a- Fringe of Disturbance Passes Capital. The National Capital will be on the outer edge of a heavy storm now moving off the Atlantic Coast which yesterday deluged Appalachicola, Fla. The only cffects of the storm likely to be felt here will be possible light showers late today, with cooler weather tomorrow. The storm, which was brewed in the Gulf region six days ago. was relatively stationary for five days and moved farther during the past 24 hours than in the preceding five days. Today the storm centered off the Georgia Coast and was moving rapidly northeastward. Storm warnings were posted from the Virginia Capes to Atlantic City today. Exceedingly heavy rains fell all along the Southern Atlantic Coast yesterday and last night. ] APPALACHICOLA, Fla.. September 15 i/P).—Wind and rain lashed sections of North Florida and South Georgia to day as the Weather Bureau reported a tropical disturbance out of the Gulf of Mexico curving inland on a north eastward course. Official observers reported wind ve locities up to 35 miles an hour as the center of the storm drove overland near Appalachicola late yesterday and an Appalachicola & Northern Railroad train ran into a washout, leaving only the engine on the track. There were no casualties. The Weather Bureau here reported 16.56 itrt-hes of rain during the past 36 hours last night and water was standing in a few of the residencès in the lower sections oî the city. Tal lahassee, to the northeast, reported shifting winds and rainfall in torrents. Communication lines were damaged. CHANNEL BESTS 2 GIRLS Pair Abandons Swim Because of Thirst. CAPE GRIS NEZ, France, September 15 </P).—A German girl. Loe Koch, and a Dutch miss. F. Brouwer, both aban doned attempts to swim the English Channel todcy after they had covered about 10 miles. Both said they were unable to continue because of thirst. The girls started out at the same time last night. BONUS CHALLENGE FACES ROOSEVELT Hoover's Attack on Proposal Puts Issue Strongly Up to Governor. BY G. GOULD LINCOLN*. President Hoover's attack on the pro- j posai to pay immediately the soldiers' j bonus held the center of the political stage today, along with the Interest In what the American Legion would do about the bonus at its national conven- j tion In Portland. The President in his statement. Is- ! sued last night to the press, said the Immediate payment of the bonus to the veterans of the World War would be "a deadly blow at the welfare of the Nation." He said he had consistently opposed it and would continue to do so. The reiteration of his opposition to bonus payment under existing condi-1 tions by the President was held a bold move. His statement was regarded as one of the clearest expositions of the bonus problem yet made. Challenge to Roosevelt. More particularly the President's statement was regarded as a challenge to the Democratic nominee. Gov. Frank lin D. Roosevelt of New York, who so far has declined to answer questions as to his stand on the immediate payment of the bonus. The President's bonus statement came on the eve of action on the bonus by the American Legion convention. A year ago the President attended the Legion convention in Detroit and made a direct appeal to the members of the organization not to support a resolution calling for immediate payment of the bonus. His appeal was successful at that time. There is an element in the Legion today strongly opposing the cash payment of the bonus. But all indica tions have been that the group favor ing the payment would win by ι con siderable margin. Furthermore, the President made his position on the bonus known again within a day or two after the publica tion by Alfred E. Smith in the Satur- ' day Evening Post of an article dealing with the payment to World War veter- ! ans, in which he clearly Indicated his own opposition to the present payment of the rest of the bonus and In which he declared that the American people : were entitled to know the position of the presidential candidates on this im portant question. Escape Is Impossible From Economy Law, Even Beyond Grave The economy law extends even beyond the grave. In a decision to the War De partment, Controller General Mc Carl today held that the six month's pay given as a gratuity to the survivors of a man dying while in one of the armed serv ices, Is subject to the statutory 813 per cent deduction. The ruling came in the case of payment authorized for the death of Lieut. Hugh C. Minter of the Army Air Corps, killed in an aerial crash in Juiy. Nmith Also ruts yuesnon. Mr. Smith, like President Hoover, has put the question strongly up to Gov. j Roosevelt. The Governor stands at ( present to win the support of the Legion- ; îaires, who are against President Hoover because of his attitude toward the bonus 1 payment. But if the Governor comes j out against such payment, then he will be on all-fours with Mr. Hoover on this issue, and the question is largely j taken out of the national campaign. ; Gov. Roosevelt quite naturally may not desire to lose this advantage. On the I other hand, if Gov. Roosevelt takes the j view that the bonus should be paid without further delay, then he will have strong opposition from opponents of j bonus payment. The New York Times | (Continued on Page 2, Column 6.) YVATSOiTrËCOVERING; WILL CONTINUE PROGRAM Indiana Senator Improved After Attack Suffered While Speak ing Yesterday. By the Associated Press. INDIANAPOLIS, September 15.—Ap parently recovered from an attack which forced him to stop speaking In the middle of a political address at Madison, Ind., yesterday. United States Senator James E. Watson today said he planned to continue his week's pro gram without change. The veteran Republican, resting in his hotel here after an automobile trip from Madison last night, said he felt much better. He had complained of the heat during his address and ex pressed fear he migiit collapse. Wat son, who is 68 years old. spoke lor an hour and Ave minutes before quitting suddenly. The Senator revealed that he had collapsed a few days agu after a speech at Peru, Ind.. and had had three sim ilar attacks in Washington in recent months LEGION CENSURES WAR DEPARTMENT ON HURLEY SPEECH Convention Finds Copies of His Address in Chairs and Denounces Action. CASH BONUS RESOLUTION ADOPTED, 1,268 TO 109 Ballot on National Commander Scheduled Today—Censure of Hoover Refused. By the Associated Press. PORTLAND, Ore., September 15.— A resolution favoring immediate cash payment of the soldier bonus was passed on a roll call vote today at the convention of the American Legion. The vote was 1.268 for to 109 against. By the Associated Press AUDITORIUM. PORTLAND. Oreg, September 15.—The War Department was censured In a viva voce vote today at the national convention of the Amer ican Legion. An outbreak of shouting after- the vote interrupted proceedings for a time. The vote was taken after Harry M. Arthur, department commander of South Carolina, lodged a complaint because envelopes containing a speech by Secretary of War Patrick J. Hurley on the bonus marchers had been placed in the chairs of all delegates. These envelopes bore the frank of the War Department. The ayes and noes both were loud, but Comdr. Stevens declared the vote of censure had carried. After Arthur shouted his complaint, the convention by acclamation declared its opposition to such action by the War Department "or any other gov ernmental department." The envelopes contained sheets head ed "Statement by the Hon. Patrick J. Hurley, Secretary of War, on Bonus , Marchers in Washington.'' It said in introduction: "In the in terests of truth and accuracy, I want to place before you the following perti nent facts about the riot that took place in the City of Washington on July 28." It repeated in essential details the statements that have come from the administration recently on the bonus : march and the eviction of the veterans by use of trocps. A part of the letter was devoted to the order that Secretary Hurley issued railing the Army into action on the aft ernoon of July 28. The statement concluded with the paragraph: "All fatalities incident to the riot took place before the arrival of Federal troops. After the arrival of the United States troops, a force of about 600 men. not one shot was fired and no person was seriously injured. Law and order were promptly restored." Johnson Declared m i,raa. Louis A. Johnson. Clarksburg. W. Va., attorney, was declared by his supporters to be assured of the post of national commander. Henry L. Stevens, jr.. North Carolina, will retire as com mander after a year's service. George Malone. Nevada, and Prank N. Belgrano, California, were still in the running, however, for commander. Others of the 11 m?n who had been ad vanced for the post were throwing their support to one or another of the leading trio. Speeches on the immediate payment of the bonus were limited by a vote of the convention to five minutes. Comdr. Stevens said he felt sure the resolution would be adopted overwhelmingly, but that both sides should be given a re spectful hearing. Loud boos greeted Sam Reynolds of Nebraska as he was called to present the case against the bonus. Comdr. Stevens intervened. "Let's hear them all." he said. Scattered boos continued to heckle Reynolds. • The question," he said, "is whether we shall place first the Nation s good i or the disabled man's welfare."' "All the Nation," he continued, "is : awaiting the action of this convention. All the people know we are under fire. J •'Unless we stop that storm which is j growing we will see the day when men j run for office on the boast of 'stop the veterans.' " Legionnaires were to express their views on the subject of prohibition, but apparently an attempt to have the organization censure president Hoo (.Continued on Page 2, Column 8.) Berlin Bandits Shoot Four. BERLIN. September 15 (JP\.—Pour bandits shot down four attendants ol the Berlin Bus Co. in a daylight rob bery today, killing one of the attend ants and escaping with S10.000 which was being taken to a bank for deposit. The robbery took place within sight of hundreds of people who were hur rying to work. Bank Robbed of $9,000. MARION, Ohio, September 15 {tΡ).— Forcing three employes and two cus tomers to lie on the floor, two bandits robbed the Richwood Banking Co., of Richwood. 16 miles southwest of here, of between $9,000 and $10.000 shortly after the bank opened today. SPIDER'S VICTORY OVER SNAKE IN WEB PREDICTED BY SCIENCE Silken Cords Firmly Hold Ten-Inch Reptile as Controversy Rages Over Humane Issue. By the Associated Prese. ι ST. CHARLES, 111., September 15 — Science Is predicting victory for the common black spider in its long fight with the 10-inch garter snake, around which It spun its web 24 days ago. Suspended in the air, with its head enmeshed in a strong silken rope, the snake began its 25th day of struggle to disengage Itself, but, in the opinion of Walter Necker of the Field Museum of Natural History, there is no chance to escape. Under a magnifying glass the reptile was seen to be as securely bound as though it were held in chains of iron. "I know of one case in which a rattle snake lived for months without food or water, but I wouldn't give this small fellow more than a moi^ji to live un- | der the same conditions." Mr. Necker said, after looking at the life-and-death struggle nature is staging in a city pump house. But the snake was not without its partisans. Two fashionably dressed women, among the many attracted to the scene of the fight, screamed yester day as they watched the spider toss additional silken loops around the head of the victim. At the same time an investigator for the Illinois Humane So ciety asked Mayor I. G. Langum to put an end to the struggle. Mayor Langum. who is betting on the spider, refused to interfere. There appears to be but one chance, in the belief of the experts, that the mayor may lasc, in which case the credit won't go to the snake, but to another spider. They agree that the rpider is a male belonging to that species which sometimes is killed by the female οt it* own kind· RUSSELL CONCEDED Beats Crisp for Senate Nomi nation—Jones Wins in Washington. By the Associated Press. Georgia Democrats yesterday nomi nated two senatorial candidates in the State primaries and the Delaware Re publicans' convention named Attorney General Reuben Satterthwaite, jr., to succeed Representative Robert G. Hous ton. Gov. Richard B. Russell, jr., was eon ceded victory in Georgia Dy his veteran opponent, Representative Charles R. Crisp, in the contest to fill the vacancy created by the death of Senator Wil liam J. Harris. Senator Walter F. George was renominated without oppo sition for the long term. Results of Tuesday's primaries in Colorado will bring Alva B. Adams, Democrat, and Karl C. Schuyler, Re publican, to battle for the senatorial ; election In November. Senator Carl Hayden and Representa tive Lewis Douglas appeared renomi nated by the Arizona Democrats, which is tantamount to election. Washington Republicans renominated Senator Wesley L. Jcnss, but Repre sentative Ralph Horr of tne first ι Se attle) district was defeated by John F. Miller, former member. Michigan renominated Its Republican and one Democratic incumbent in the House. LANKFORD TRAILS DEAN. Vinson Far Ahead and Ramsperk Has Long Lead. ATLANTA, Ga„ September 15 i/P).— In the seven-man race for Governor. Commissioner of Agriculture Eugene Talmadge had 278 unit votes from 113 of 151 counties. Abit Nix, Athens, Ga . attorney, had 21 counties and 68 unit votes: former Gov. Thomas Hardwick, 8 counties and 26 unit votes, and the others trailed far behind. An unofficial tabulation shows Repre sentative Homer C. Parker of the first district was nominated for another term. He was opposed by Hugh Peter son. jr., and Albert L. Cobb. Representative William C. Ramspeck, incumbent. In the fifth district, had a long lead over three opponents. Representative Carl Vinson was far ahead in the sixth district. His op ponent was Judge R. Earl Camp. First returns from the eighth district, | incomplete and unofficial, gave Braswell Dean, newspaper editor, a lead over Representative W. C. Lankford. A partial compilation by the Colum bus Enquirer-Sun on returns from the third district put Β. T. Castellow in the lead, with H. E. Coates second and '■

Ralston Cargill third. MICHIGAN INCUMBENTS WIN. | DETROIT. September 15 (Λ").—The make-up of the general election contest in most of Michigan's 17 congressional ! districts was determined by the returns ; from the primary tabulated up to late 1 last night. In a few Instances, close races left the Issue in doubt. Nominees shown by the returns in the j various districts follow: •Indicates incumbents. First district—Republican, Charier j Mahoney, colored. Detroit; Democrat, George G. Sadowski, Detroit. Second district—Republican, *Earl C. Michener, Adrian; Democrat, John C. Lehr, Monroe. Third district—Republican. 'James L. Hooper. Battle Creek; Democrat, Charles E. Gauss, Marshall. Fourth district—Republican, 'John C. Ketcham, Hastings; Democrat, Roman I. Jarvis, Benton Harbor, leading in close race. Fifth district—Republican, 'Carl Ε Mapes, Grand Rapids; Democrat, Win field Caslow. Grand Rapids. Sixth district—Republican. 'Seymour Person: Democrat, Claude E. Cady, Lansing, leading in close race. Seventh district—Republican. 'Jesse (Continued on Page 3, Column 5.) MRS. ROBINS "IN DARK" OVER HUSBAND'S ABSENCE ι Nothing New Develops After Con ference With. Dr. Polingr, Dry Leader. By the Associated Press. KENNEBUNK BEACH, Me.. Septem ber 15.—Mrs. Margaret Dreier Robins, wife of Col. Raymond Robins, prominent prohibitionist, who disappeared 12 days ago, said today she was "utterly in the dark" after a conference with Dr. Dan iel A. Poling, prohibition leader. Dr. Poling, who met Mrs. Robins at the Summer home of Salmon O. Lev inson, Chicago attorney, here this morn ing, added that "a comparison of our notes and ideas has developed nothing new." Radio Promets on Page C-6, ■Kr Senate ISoniinee GOV. BUSSELL Of Georgia. 10 FIRED BILLETS REMAINS MYSTERY! Assistant Secretary Payne Asks What Difference It Makes, Anyhow. Acting Secretary of War Payne, who is investigating matters connected with the evacuation of the bonus camps, de clared today that it did not make any difference who burned down the huts since they were going to be burned any way. Col. Payne was seen at the White House, where he conferred with one oi the President's secretaries on routine departmental matters. Upon leaving the White House he ;aid in reply to ! questions : "Ail this talk about the soldiers burn ing the huts is just so much talk to confuse the issu?. The main thing is that the area was cleared in a few hours without any casualties. Sorte officer on the ground might have given the order to fire the Ruts. At any rate they were going to be burned, so what difference did it make? Whether they were fired by bonus men or troops was of no consequence." Mr. Payne's remarks came after mystery attached to the burning of bonus army billets In the Pennsylvania avenue camps—a subject of much con- ! troversy since the eviction—was only partially cleared today by Maj. Gen. George Van Horn Moselev, acting chief ι of staff of the Army, who was repre sented as saying that his investigation ι had convinced him some of the shacks had been fired by soldiers in reserve, who were "mopping up" the area after its evacuation. Gen. Moseley further was represented as saying that in his opinion gas grenades, used by troops, may have contributed to the burning of j billet·;. Gen. Moseley, however, refused to deny or affirm published reports that orders had been given troops to burn billets of the bonus marchers. Officers in command of the reserve forces had 1 authority, however, to exercise their j own discretion in doing whatever they 1 considered necessary under the circum stances. Affidavits Are Cited. A verbal statement authorized by Gen. Moseley was made for the press j today after the acting chief of staff is ; understood to have seen affidavits from Lieut. George M. Kernan and Pvt. j Thomas Ε Davis, Company M. 12th Infantry, stationed at Port Washing-, ton, stating that orders had been given for setting fire to the billets. Unofficially, it was learned at the War Department that no actual orders were issued by Gen. Douglas Mac Arthur. chief of ftaff, but officers under his command had baen told if any bil lets were burned they would not be made to render an accounting. Gen. Moseley's statement was made indirectly to the press through Lieut. Col. P. V. Kieffer, in charge of the War Department press relations, after (Continued on Page 2, Column 4.) BRAZILIANS TAKE TOWN Sao Paulo Rebels Routed From Cachocira, Government Reports. RIO DE JENEIRO, September 15 (/P). —Federal troops have taken the town of Cachceira from the Sao Paulo rebels, the government announced today, and the rebels have begun a retreat toward Lorena. _ «VILLE BEATS PAS 10 TAKE LEAD Former Canadian Champion 2 Up on Blaney—Fischer and Ouimet Even. By the Associated Press. FIVE FARMS COURSE. Baltimore Country Clv.b, September 15.—A record smashing 68, two under par. for the difficult Five Farms course by Ross Somerville, former Canadian champion, today featured the first round of the quarter-finals In the United States amateur golf championship. Somerville'j finish over the last nine in 33 s'rekes enabled him to fight off the spirited chaKenge of Bill Blaney of Boston, just 27 years o!d today, and gain a 2-up lead at the half-way mark of their 3C-hole battle. The Canadian's total clipped a stroke ofl the forme cimpctitive record of 69. which was touched by Johnny Fischer of Cincinnati, the medalist, in the qualifying round. Fischer, still very much In the title fight among the eight survivor», held the veteran defending champion. Fran cis Ouimet of Boston, all square through their first round. Guilford Heads Evans. The other two matches also developed close and interesting contests as Big Jeise Guilford of Boston, the 1921 champion, finished the first round 1 up on Chick Evans of Chicago, two-time former champion, ar.d Johnny Good man of Omaha came back with a rush to be all even with Maurice J. Mc Carthy. jr.. star New York youngster. Ouimet had an uphill fight on his hands from the start and was lucky to hold his young rival In chcck. The champion was 2 down at the ninth. 3 down at the tenth before he began his comeback. After taking the eleventh as Fischer rimmed the cup. Ouimet was helped in winning the twelfth by a penalty shot, called on Johnny for soling his club in the ditch paralleling the fairway. The stroke penalty was called after Fischer, from the edge of the water, had made a beautiful recovery to the green. Instead of lying 2. with a chance to halve the hole, he was 3 on and con ceded the hole after taking two putts without getting down. Holed 20-Foot Putt. Guilford holed a 20-foot putt on the eighteenth hole for a birdie to gain his narrow lead over Evans as the two for mer champions waged a ding-dong bat tle. featured by Chick's generally steady play and Guilford's terrific hitting. The "Siege Gun" had an eagle 3 on the 590 yard sixth, where he holed out a niblick shot from 10 yards off the green. He was only 50 yards short of the 600-yard fourteenth in 2 and chipped close enough to be conceded a birdie 4, as Chick was in trouble. Goodman twice squared his match with McCarthy, first at the twelfth and again at the seventeenth with a 12-foot putt for a birdie. But for lapses in his putting the Ne braskan might have taken a good lead. He missed a 2-footer on the ninth after a great tee shot and his putt for a birdie on the eighteenth hole bounced out of the cup. Both youngsters shot fine golf. McCarthy posting a 72 and Goodman a 73. · China Has 474.787,386 People. NANKING. China. September 15 <>Ρ). —China's population totals 474.787,386. the Nationalist government's ministry of interior announced today. It said the population had increased only 75, 000,000 in the past two centuries. Appoint Newfoundland Governor. LONDON. September 15 (JP).—Admiral Sir David Murray Anderson has been appointed governor and commander in chief of Newfoundland, succeeding Sir John Middleton. Announcement of the King's approval of the appointment was made yesterday. JAPAN RECOGNIZES MANCHUKUO STATE AS CHINA PROTESTS Ceremony to Mark Signing at Changchun Resembles War Parley. NANKING SENDS APPEAL TO MAJOR WORLD POWERS Charge» Violation of National Rights—Tokio Celebrate» Vic tory and Defies Opposition. Β ι the Associated Press. CHANGCHUN, September 15.—The state oi M&nchukuo, youngest of the world's commonwealth! and born oi the successful military campaign of the Japanese army in Manchuria last Fall, was recognized officially by Japan today. At a drab and listless ceremony In the old Salt Administration Building here, j In the presence of Manchukuo officials and their corps of Japanese advisors, ι Cheng Hsiao-Hsu, premier of Manchu- ' kuo, and Oen. Nobuyoehi Muto, special envoy of the Japanese Mikado, affixed j their names, using a tiny brush instead ; of a pen. The treaty calls for a defensive alii- ' ance between the two states and marks the first recognition of the new nation by a foreign power. The Lague of Na tions decision is being awaited on the Japanese military campaign in Man- 1 churia, following the report of the League's inquiry commission, which now , is on file in Geneva. Army Officers Attend. The signing occupied less than 10 minutes. Gen. Muto signed first, then Premier Cheng. Henry Pu-Yi, who wore an inscrutable Mon?. Lisa smile, ; looked on. The scene resembled a war conference more than a peace conclave. Japanese 1 military officials packed the room dur ing the ceremony, generals, colonels and i majors, all resplendent in red, yellow ι and gold uniforms. An Oriental tone was provided by the I presence of a number of aged Mongol ι and Manchu princes, wearing queues. After signing the treaty Gen. Muto proposed Henry Pj-Yi's health in cham pagne and Mr. Pu-Yi returned the compliment. To signalize the event the j Mikado sent Pu-Yi a magnificent set of j armor, worked in gold and silver and : a string of pearls to Mme. Pu-Yi. Gen. Muto said afterward he consid- j ered that Japan and Manchukuo were "bound to stand or fall together." "Manchukuo." he said, "already has given assurances she will maintain the open door policy and give equal oppor- ; tunity to all. and also that she intends to abolish extraterritoriality and revise the treaties relating to this subject." j Palace Closely Guarded. The retting for the ceremony was as unostentatious as the creation of the S new state a few months ago. The room : in which the signing took place, in con- j trast with the glittering halls where ! most similar treaties have been signed in Europe in recent years, might have been a modest American flat. Yellow linoleum covered the floor and some nondescript paintings hung upon the walls. On the windows were sim ple lace curtains. The treaty was signed at a plain oak desk. Henry Pu-Yi wore a frock coat, j striped trousers, a wing collar and j natty tie. Gen. Muto was resplendent ] in a uniform which glittered with deco rations. To forestall any possible attack by : the Chinese, the Japanese general was heavily guarded as he rode to the pal ace and the palace itself resembled an armed fortress. The Chinese population, however, showed no outward enthusiasm and went their way in silence. Some of them appeared disposed to observe instruc tions from Nanking that this week be observed as the week of China's humil iation. The Japanese population, on the other hand, sho»ed much enthu siasm. Lieut. Gen. Kuniaki Kioso. chief of the Japanese Army staff in Manchuria, said: "Japan would have been inhuman had she hesitated to recognize the in fant state. Japan has no territorial ambitions in Manchuria. If she had why should she recognize Manchukuo?" Foreign Minister Hsieh Chieh-Hsihi said the protocol permanently guaran tees Manchukuo's existence. He added he hoped the powers speedily would rec ognize the new state and said if any of them doubted Manchukuo's intention to (Continued on Page 2, Column 1.) SOCIAL WORKER SUICIDE Samuel Drucker. Nationally Known, Victim of Poison. PITTSBURGH, September 15 (/PI — Samuel Drucker, 50. nationally known social worker, died in a hospital today, and the coroner reported his death as suicide. The report explains he died of the effects of poison he swallowed in the dental ofBce of the Jewish Home for Babies and Children, of which he was superintendent. He came to Pittsburgh from Boston six months ago. and Mrs. Barnett Davis, chairman of the board of direc tors. said he was asked to vacate his position after a hastily called meeting of the directors yesterday. He was the author of a book on the education of children. GIVEN 10 YEARS IN SING SING, ROBBER TO DO "LITERARY WORK" Prisoner, Son of Qergyman, Says Career Was Decided j While He Was Serving San Quentin Term. j By the Associated Press. NEW YORK, September 15—A 10 year term in Sing Sing Prison, during which be said he planned to continue "literary work" begun in San Quentin Prison, California, was Imposed today upon John Evans, alias Earl Shelton and John W. Lucas. Evans, who said he w«s 25. a native of Colorado and the son of a clergyman, pleaded guilty a week ago to attempted The prisoner refused to discuss de tails of his early life or to tell the whereabouts or name of his father, explaining that his father was In poor health. The only information he gave regarding his childhood was that he was born in Estes Park, Colo., and left home at the age of 16, after attending high school in Denver. He said that in March. 1927, he was sentenced to five years in San Quentin for a Los Angeles robbery and while in prison read exten sively. intending to pursue « literary career when his term ended. HOOVER LAUNCHES MOBILIZED RELIEF ON WINTER DRIVE Cautions Welfare Conference That None Shall Go Hungry or Cold. PRESIDENT ADDRESSES LEADERS OF 29 GROUPS Outlines Four Duties Facing Them. Believes This the Last Winter of Depression. Advising his hearers to 'see that no man, woman or child shall go hungry or unsheltered through the approaching Winter," President Hoover this morning opened the one-day conference of the Welfare and Relief Mobilization of 193.', represented by several hundred industrial and social service leaders appearing for 29 Nation-wide social service organiza tions. The President charged the mobiliza tion with three other duties during the coming Winter—to "see that our greai benevolent agencies for character build ing. for hospitalization, for care of ciiil dren and all their vast agencies of vol untary solicitude for the less fortunate are maintained in fall strength; to maintain the bedrock principles of our liberties by the full mobilization of in dividual and local resources and re sponsibilities" and to "maints in the spiritual impulses in our people for gen erous giving and generous service—m the spirit that each is his brother's keeper." Cites Relief "Backlogs." Point.ng to the $300.000,000 Federal relief program, the Government build ing program and the Red Cross distribu tion of cotton and wheat as "backlogs" behind the efforts of the social service workers, the President said: "We must make sure that no Amer ican this Winter goes hungry or cold. "These programs of the Government are based upon continuance of your services. They presuppose adequate neighborhood support to your efforts, which still comprise a large part of our reliance. They presuppose that the thousands of agencies which in normal times carry the load of distress shall function this Winter to their utmoet capacity. Let no man believe, because we have summoned the power of the Government to these ends, that it can replace your efforts." The President saw signs of improving economic conditions which may make this the last Winter of depression hard ship. "Last Winter of Calamity." "This is. I trust," he said, "the last Winter of this great calamity. Yet de spite a dawning hope upon the horizon, individual need in the meantime may be greater than before." Foreseeing that there might be greater difficulty this year than in former years in obtaining private subscriptions for welfare and relief work, he said, never theless. he was "confident you will suc ceed " "Our people," he added, "are the moet generous of all peoples." The President was answered by the chairman of the mobilization, Newton D. Baker, who dwelt not only upon the actual welfare and relief needs of the present crisis, but also on the need for (Continued on Page 3, Column 1.) WALKER VACANCY UNDER ADVISEMENT Case Argued Before Justice Mc Geehan May Be Taken to Court of Appeals. By the Associated Près·;. NEW YORK. September 15.—The question of when New York will elect a mayor to fill the post James J. Walker resigned is now in Supreme Court Justice McGeehan's hands, but it appears likely the case will be car ried to the Court of Appeals. In a hearing yesterday, represent atives of Tammany Hall and Socialists argued for an election November 8. Representatives of Mayor Joseph V. McKee, who succeeded Walker, appeared in behalf of his action to test his right to hold office until a year from Janu ary. The judge reserved decision. Walker is a Tammany man, while McKee Is a non-Tammany Democrat, being a Bronx man. Tammany has not indicated whom it will support ior the mayoralty. JOHN L. LEWIS STRICKEN PREPARING FOR PARLEY Miners' Leader Believed Suffering From Indigestion or Ptomaine. Sessions Week Old. By the Associated Press. NEW YORK, September 15—John L. Lewis, president of the United Mine Workers of America, was stricken with an attack of acute indigestion or pto maine poisoning today as he was pre paring to attend today's conference on conditions in the anthracite industry. Lewis, leader of the group of miners' representatives attending the confer ence with a group of operators, was confined to his room at the Hotel Penn sylvania and it could not be immediately learned whether his illness was caused by indigestion or food poisoning. The operators and miners have been holding conferences since last week to discuss a proposition submitted by the producers calling for the reponlng of the present working agreement and a reduction in wage rates. FLYING FAMILY LEAVES Htktchinsons Depart on Trawler Bound for England. COPENHAGEN. Denmark, September 15 (iΡ>.—GBeorge R. Hutchinson and his "flying family" will leave Angmagsalik. Greenland, today for England on the trawler Lord Talbot, the Danish admin istrator there informed the government. The Hutchinsons, attempting a flight from New York to London over the Arctic route, wrecked their plane near Angmagsallk and were rescued by the Lord Talbot on Tuesday.

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